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température à l'extinction

English translation: slaking temperature

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09:56 Aug 12, 2000
French to English translations [PRO]
Tech/Engineering
French term or phrase: température à l'extinction
I have hunted high and low for the translation of "température à l'extinction" but have been unable it in my specialist dictionaries or on the internet. It appears in the following sentence for which I have provided my draft translation beneath:

"Les chaux hydrauliques sont obtenues à partir de calcaires contenant une proportion d'argile, conséquente (de 8 à 20%), modifiant profondément les caractéristiques du liant. En effet, à partir de 8% d'argile, la température à l'extinction baisse considérablement, le temps de prise s'accélère et surtout le phénomène de prise peut se passer d'air".

"Hydraulic limes are obtained by mixing limestone with a significant proportion of clay, (from 8 to 20%), which completely modifies the properties of the binder. With an 8% clay content, the ??? drops considerably, the setting time speeds up and, above all, the phenomenon of setting does not require the presence of air."

I was wondering if it might refer to "hardening time" but I'd be grateful for any suggestions.
Helen
English translation:slaking temperature
Explanation:
"slaking" refers to the disintegration of lime caused by exposure to air and/or moisture. "Slaked lime" is a powder (Ca(OH)2 obtained through the action of water on line, and is used mainly in mortars, plasters, and cement. It's also known as "lime hydrate," "calcium hydrate," or "hydrated lime." (However, in this case I'd stick with "hydraulic lime," which is a type of limestone that has been heated and pulverized, and absorbs water without swelling or heating, yielding a cement that hardens under water. (Does this part of your text refer, by chance, to the construction of quays and jetties by the Romans?))

With this information in mind, I'd like to offer the following English sentence (essentially the same as yours, but with a few small tweaks):
"The various types of hydraulic [i.e., artificial] limestone are obtained from limestone that contains a significant amount of clay (8 to 20%), which completely changes the properties of the binder. With a clay content of 8% or more, the slaking temperature drops considerably; the setting time is shorter; and, above all, the setting phenomenon requires no air." -- (Ideal for harbor construction, eh?)

The two web sites below discuss slaking temperatures, slaking chambers, lime/water ratios, etc., and include drawings. -- Cheers, HC
Selected response from:

Heathcliff
United States
Local time: 14:59
Grading comment
Thanks for your excellent answer - the websites are very useful. Unfortunately my context does not state the type of buildings in which hydraulic lime was used but it could well have been for harbours or perhaps, as my text deals with a Roman city, in the construction of bath houses.
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
naslaking temperatureHeathcliff
naPlease see below:
Luis Luis
naLook at belowK.M.


  

Answers


2 hrs
Look at below


Explanation:
"The hydraulic limes are gotten to leave from limestones containing a proportion of clay, consequent (of 8, 20%), modifying deeply features of the binder. "Hydraulic files are obtained by mixing limestone with has significant proportion of clay, (from 8 to 20%), does which completely modify tea properties of tea binder. I was wondering yew it might refer to" hardening time" goal I'd be grateful heart any suggestions."

What kind of field is this sentence?
You shoud be hard worker on your field.
I will respect you who have a thirst for knowledge.

K.M.
Local time: 06:59

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
Heathcliff

Louise Atfield

Nikki Scott-Despaigne
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5 hrs
Please see below:


Explanation:
I think that they are talking about a concrete mixture.
As the concrete solidifies, it heats up.

This is called "Hydration". So what they mean is the "Temperature of hydration"; the curing temperature, which is the end of the chemical reactions that make concrete hard.


Hoping to help.

Luis Luis

Luis Luis
United States
Local time: 16:59
Native speaker of: Native in PortuguesePortuguese
PRO pts in pair: 35

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
Heathcliff
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15 hrs
slaking temperature


Explanation:
"slaking" refers to the disintegration of lime caused by exposure to air and/or moisture. "Slaked lime" is a powder (Ca(OH)2 obtained through the action of water on line, and is used mainly in mortars, plasters, and cement. It's also known as "lime hydrate," "calcium hydrate," or "hydrated lime." (However, in this case I'd stick with "hydraulic lime," which is a type of limestone that has been heated and pulverized, and absorbs water without swelling or heating, yielding a cement that hardens under water. (Does this part of your text refer, by chance, to the construction of quays and jetties by the Romans?))

With this information in mind, I'd like to offer the following English sentence (essentially the same as yours, but with a few small tweaks):
"The various types of hydraulic [i.e., artificial] limestone are obtained from limestone that contains a significant amount of clay (8 to 20%), which completely changes the properties of the binder. With a clay content of 8% or more, the slaking temperature drops considerably; the setting time is shorter; and, above all, the setting phenomenon requires no air." -- (Ideal for harbor construction, eh?)

The two web sites below discuss slaking temperatures, slaking chambers, lime/water ratios, etc., and include drawings. -- Cheers, HC



    Reference: http://www.zmichemical.com/slaker.html
    Reference: http://www.chemicallime.com/porta_batch.html
Heathcliff
United States
Local time: 14:59
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 953
Grading comment
Thanks for your excellent answer - the websites are very useful. Unfortunately my context does not state the type of buildings in which hydraulic lime was used but it could well have been for harbours or perhaps, as my text deals with a Roman city, in the construction of bath houses.

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
xxx2BO

Nikki Scott-Despaigne
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)




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