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en pression vs en traction

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14:42 Aug 16, 2000
French to English translations [PRO]
Tech/Engineering
French term or phrase: en pression vs en traction
Whilst I understand the difference between jacks that work "en pression" and "en traction" I have been unable to find these expressions in my internet search nor in my building dictionaries. According to my context which deals with the straightening of walls that have become unstable and are either leaning inwards or outwards, I believe that the jacks that work "en pression" serve to push the wall back to its upright position whilst the jacks that work "en traction" push the walls upright and maybe some sort of hydraulic jack.

I would be grateful for any suggestions.
Helen
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Summary of answers provided
na>> see below <<Heathcliff
naPlease see below:
Luis Luis
naforgot to add this
Nikki Scott-Despaigne
nasee below
Nikki Scott-Despaigne
naPush-Pull Technique
Dr Claudio De Marchi


  

Answers


38 mins
Push-Pull Technique


Explanation:
You're right. That's the name of such a technique.

Dr Claudio De Marchi
Local time: 06:59
Native speaker of: Native in ItalianItalian

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Heathcliff
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10 hrs
see below


Explanation:
TRACTION, the act of drawing or pulling or of being drawn or pullled (from the Latin : trahere, to drag)

Acc. to Dic. d'Architecture & Constrcution, Forbes, J.R., Lavoisier :
traction = tension
traction du tirant d'ancrage = anchor pull
traction pure = direct tension
de traction = tensile

Acc. to Architecture & Batiment, Hasol, D., Moniteur :
traction = drawing-out, racking, tentering tension

TENSION, potential difference, straining, pulling

Forbes :
tension = tension
tension = (force) stress
tension de rupture = breaking stress

Hasol :
tension (contrainte) admise/admissible = admissible stress, allowable stress, safe stress
tension de compression = compressive stress
tension de flambage = buckling stress (when a boat's mast buckles, usually just before it snaps!)
tension (contrainte) de flexion = bending stress (something structural engineers will look into before giving their opinion on the loads which a particular mast may be able to bear)

See also (Hasol) tension de traction = tensile stress.

CONCLUSION :
Although each terms does clearly have its own meaning, in specific contexts, they do merge. Simply put, I think that the push-pull term provided above must work.

Check out structural engineers' sites, in FR and in EN.

Good luck.





    Forbes (see body of explanation)
    Hasol (idem)
Nikki Scott-Despaigne
Local time: 06:59
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 4431

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Heathcliff
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10 hrs
forgot to add this


Explanation:
On a big boat you will find :
vérin (de mat) = mast jack
vérin = hydraulic tensioner
vérin hydraulique (sur un pilot automatique) = hydraulic drive unit (the sort of thing which lets the single-handers down on races, forcing them to call it a day)

These are just some examples. If it's bearing a load, it's a jack. If it's keeping something under tension, it is generally referred to - in this context anyway - as a tensioner, which is pretty clear.

One or t<wo sites for reference, the first of which is a site where hydraulic units are repaired, the second is used in public works. Have a look at www.sogesec.net just for fun.


    Reference: http://www.cm-larochelle.fr
    Reference: http://www.sahleduc.com
Nikki Scott-Despaigne
Local time: 06:59
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 4431

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Heathcliff
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20 hrs
Please see below:


Explanation:
en pression - "compression" jacks. This is were the load path follows into the jack strut, or arm itself, thus tending to buckle or crush the jack strut.

en traction - "tension" jacks. In this case the load path is pointing away from the jack strut, trying to stretch it, thus tending to elongate the jack strut. The words "Traction" and "tractor" have the same root, both invoking "a pulling action".

Regards,
Luis M. Luis

Luis Luis
United States
Local time: 23:59
Native speaker of: Native in PortuguesePortuguese
PRO pts in pair: 35

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Heathcliff
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3 days 9 hrs
>> see below <<


Explanation:
The crucial point in the French text seems to be that the "verins en pression" push the wall AWAY from themselves, while the "verins en traction" draw the walls TOWARD themselves, regardless of the side of the wall on which a given "verin" is located. Not to detract in any way at all from the earlier excellent research, but have you considered simply "pressure jacks" and "traction jacks," perhaps with a parenthetical explanatory note?

Heathcliff
United States
Local time: 21:59
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 953
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