KudoZ home » French to English » Telecom(munications)

sans atténuation du débit

English translation: with no reduction in the data rate

Advertisement

Login or register (free and only takes a few minutes) to participate in this question.

You will also have access to many other tools and opportunities designed for those who have language-related jobs
(or are passionate about them). Participation is free and the site has a strict confidentiality policy.
GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
French term or phrase:sans atténuation du débit
English translation:with no reduction in the data rate
Entered by: Tony M
Options:
- Contribute to this entry
- Include in personal glossary

07:49 Sep 9, 2011
French to English translations [PRO]
Tech/Engineering - Telecom(munications)
French term or phrase: sans atténuation du débit
Qu'est-ce que la fibre optique?

La fibre optique est un fil en verre très fin et souple, permettant le transport de données à la vitesse de la lumière SANS ATTENUATION DU DEBIT...

= without loss of throughput ?
xxxs.brook1
Local time: 00:22
with no reduction in the data rate
Explanation:
As we're talking about 'données', I think it's appropriate to speak of data rate.

Personally, I often find it better to translate 'sans' as 'with no', which sometimes sounds more natural in EN.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 8 heures (2011-09-09 16:01:15 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

It's important to understand the distinction being made here between 'conventional' copper transmission and f/o transmission:

As far as the medium itself is concerned, f/o has a theoretically infinite frequency response (bandwidth) — up to the speed of light, at any rate! So where digital data is concerned, it can be transmitted more or less as fast as the terminal devices can cope with.

Copper transmission, on the other hand, suffers from stray capacitance / inductance and other losses which mean that any given transmission line will have a finite maximum frequency response.

However, both copper and f/o systems suffer from attenuation of the signal amplitude — this is the key factor that limits communication distance over both media. With digital signals, and repeaters at suitable intervals, f/o can now be used over incredibly long distances.

It is perhaps unfortunate that the source text uses 'atténuation' (which is more appropriate for the signal level) when referring to 'débit', where I feel 'diminution' or 'dégradation' would perhaps have been more apt.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 8 heures (2011-09-09 16:03:36 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

I think the point they are making is that over short distances (where signal level attentuation) is not significant, f/o has an effectively infinite frequency response; and even over longer distances, it is only the signal level that is degraded, not the frequency response (= bandwidth or data rate)

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 1 jour11 minutes (2011-09-10 08:00:38 GMT) Post-grading
--------------------------------------------------

Cf. Internet 'haut débit' in France, which is the equivalent of 'broadband', but literally means 'high data-rate'

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 1 jour13 heures (2011-09-10 21:36:20 GMT) Post-grading
--------------------------------------------------

Note that it is a common error to translate 'débit' as 'flow' — it generally connotes 'flow rate' ('flow' on its own is more likely 'flux'); but in technical / electronic contexts today; it very often equates to '(data) rate', and note that 'data flow' is usually rendered by 'flux de données'.
So although to the layperson the two terms may appear synonymous, in a technical context, there really is a very specific and important technical difference between them.
Selected response from:

Tony M
France
Local time: 01:22
Grading comment
Thanks a million Tony, and for your logical explanation - hugely appreciated!
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

Advertisement


Summary of answers provided
4 +3with no reduction in the data rate
Tony M
3while maintaining data flowliz askew
3 -1without attenuation of the flow/signalreeny


Discussion entries: 4





  

Answers


24 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5
while maintaining data flow


Explanation:
perhaps you could turn it round

CPE 432 Computer Design - 07 - ILP3 - Dynamic Scheduling
www.abandah.com/gheith/Courses/.../CPE731 - 9 - ILP3.pp...
File Format: Microsoft Powerpoint - Quick View
Dynamic scheduling - hardware rearranges the instruction execution to reduce stalls while maintaining data flow and exception behavior; It handles cases when ...

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 26 mins (2011-09-09 08:15:47 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

or

without interrupting data flow

Intergraph - Geospatial Solutions for Utilities
www.intergraph.com/utilities/default.aspx - Cached
These solutions assure data security without interrupting critical data flow Note: This solution is available in the U.S. only. Electric Infrastructure Management ...
[PDF]
Wavetronix Click! 104 DIN Rail Contact Closure Module
www.signalcontrol.com/.../Wavetronix_Click_104_DIN_Rail_Con...
File Format: PDF/Adobe Acrobat - Quick View
can be configured without interrupting data flow. ˿ Vehicle information to traffic controller via contact closures. Baud Rates. ˿ Supports the following baud rates: ...
USB in a NutShell - Chapter 1 - Introduction

débit (in medicine) = flow

liz askew
United Kingdom
Local time: 00:22
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 16
Notes to answerer
Asker: Thank you Liz, for your help!


Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
neutral  Tony M: There's not really a notion of 'while' here, and in this context, 'data rate' is probably more apposite than mere 'flow' / I'm sorry, but in technical translation, there is no such thing as 'picky': this is a finely-nuanced technical point (not medicine!)
8 mins
  -> I think your point is rather picky, my translation would be fine:)
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

26 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5 peer agreement (net): -1
without attenuation of the flow/signal


Explanation:
http://www.google.co.uk/search?hl=en&biw=1024&bih=585&q=opti...

suggestion..

reeny
Local time: 01:22
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 8
Notes to answerer
Asker: Thanks nonetheless Reeny, for your help!


Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
disagree  Tony M: It's very important not to confuse these two ideas: there is indeed attenuation of the signal; that's the specific point here, that the data rate is (totally) unaffected by the f-o, unlike over conventional copper links.
7 mins
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

17 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +3
with no reduction in the data rate


Explanation:
As we're talking about 'données', I think it's appropriate to speak of data rate.

Personally, I often find it better to translate 'sans' as 'with no', which sometimes sounds more natural in EN.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 8 heures (2011-09-09 16:01:15 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

It's important to understand the distinction being made here between 'conventional' copper transmission and f/o transmission:

As far as the medium itself is concerned, f/o has a theoretically infinite frequency response (bandwidth) — up to the speed of light, at any rate! So where digital data is concerned, it can be transmitted more or less as fast as the terminal devices can cope with.

Copper transmission, on the other hand, suffers from stray capacitance / inductance and other losses which mean that any given transmission line will have a finite maximum frequency response.

However, both copper and f/o systems suffer from attenuation of the signal amplitude — this is the key factor that limits communication distance over both media. With digital signals, and repeaters at suitable intervals, f/o can now be used over incredibly long distances.

It is perhaps unfortunate that the source text uses 'atténuation' (which is more appropriate for the signal level) when referring to 'débit', where I feel 'diminution' or 'dégradation' would perhaps have been more apt.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 8 heures (2011-09-09 16:03:36 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

I think the point they are making is that over short distances (where signal level attentuation) is not significant, f/o has an effectively infinite frequency response; and even over longer distances, it is only the signal level that is degraded, not the frequency response (= bandwidth or data rate)

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 1 jour11 minutes (2011-09-10 08:00:38 GMT) Post-grading
--------------------------------------------------

Cf. Internet 'haut débit' in France, which is the equivalent of 'broadband', but literally means 'high data-rate'

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 1 jour13 heures (2011-09-10 21:36:20 GMT) Post-grading
--------------------------------------------------

Note that it is a common error to translate 'débit' as 'flow' — it generally connotes 'flow rate' ('flow' on its own is more likely 'flux'); but in technical / electronic contexts today; it very often equates to '(data) rate', and note that 'data flow' is usually rendered by 'flux de données'.
So although to the layperson the two terms may appear synonymous, in a technical context, there really is a very specific and important technical difference between them.

Tony M
France
Local time: 01:22
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 298
Grading comment
Thanks a million Tony, and for your logical explanation - hugely appreciated!

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Alistair Ian Spearing Ortiz
1 hr
  -> Thanks, Alistair!

agree  Ronald van Riet: but it is still strange: optical fiber gies no signal attenuation which is completely different from data rate, or am I too puristic?
1 hr
  -> Thanks, R! No, that's the whole point: o/f DOES give signal attenuation, BUT the data rate itself is not compromised (as in conventional copper systems)

agree  Nikki Scott-Despaigne: Or "without disrupting the flow of data" http://www.sans.org/reading_room/whitepapers/physcial/fiber-... // "without disrupting the flow" is probably still quite accurate without disrupting meaning... oops! ;-)
3 hrs
  -> Thanks, Nikki! I don't honestly believe it's referring to 'disruption', nor to the 'data flow' in the more general sense.
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)




Return to KudoZ list


Changes made by editors
Sep 10, 2011 - Changes made by Tony M:
Created KOG entryKudoZ term » KOG term


KudoZ™ translation help
The KudoZ network provides a framework for translators and others to assist each other with translations or explanations of terms and short phrases.



See also:



Term search
  • All of ProZ.com
  • Term search
  • Jobs
  • Forums
  • Multiple search