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A ses deux extrémités se dressent fièrement les deux portes fortifiées crénelées

English translation: At its two ends, set into the ramparts, the two crenelated fortified gateways rise up proudly.

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23:56 Dec 5, 2004
French to English translations [PRO]
Tourism & Travel / Outdoors
French term or phrase: A ses deux extrémités se dressent fièrement les deux portes fortifiées crénelées
"A ses deux extrémités se dressent fièrement les deux portes fortifiées crénelées, percées dans les remparts"

Anybody wanna take a shot at this sentence? The words "crenelees" and "percees" what are making it most difficult for me.

Context:

Dans une forêt de 15 hectares de pins et de chênes verts, c'est la vraie Provence qui vous accueille avec sa simplicité, son soleil et son ambiance. Situé à mi-distance entre Bollène et Orange, au nord du département, Mornas s'étale au pied d'une abrupte barre rocheuse de 137 mètres. A ses deux extrémités se dressent fièrement les deux portes fortifiées crénelées, percées dans les remparts. Plus long que large, le village semble être écrasé au pied de sa barre rocheuse sur laquelle sa forteresse domine encore le Rhône du haut de sa falaise. Ce petit village a su conserver les quelques vestiges de son passé.
Donovan Libring
Local time: 08:22
English translation:At its two ends, set into the ramparts, the two crenelated fortified gateways rise up proudly.
Explanation:
A quick attempt.

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Note added at 50 mins (2004-12-06 00:47:22 GMT)
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I agree with Richard: get rid of one of the \'two\'s - maybe even both of them. And yes, \'battlements\' is more common than \'crenelated\'.
So how about: At either end, set into the ramparts, a fortified gateway surmounted by battlements rises proudly?
Selected response from:

translatol
Local time: 07:22
Grading comment
This is what I came up with. "At both ends, two fortified gates stand proudly set into the ramparts." In the end it was better to simplify it and make it clear.
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
4 +7At its two ends, set into the ramparts, the two crenelated fortified gateways rise up proudly.translatol
3See comment below...
Tony M
3At its two ends proudly draw up the two crenelated strengthened doors
Arabicstart


Discussion entries: 3





  

Answers


3 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5
A ses deux extrémités se dressent fièrement les deux portes fortifiées crénelées
At its two ends proudly draw up the two crenelated strengthened doors


Explanation:
good luck

Arabicstart
Local time: 02:22
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Native in ArabicArabic
PRO pts in category: 4

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
neutral  xxxCMJ_Trans: se dresser = are standing/stand ( 'draw up' is incorrect)
7 hrs
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18 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +7
A ses deux extrémités se dressent fièrement les deux portes fortifiées crénelées
At its two ends, set into the ramparts, the two crenelated fortified gateways rise up proudly.


Explanation:
A quick attempt.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 50 mins (2004-12-06 00:47:22 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

I agree with Richard: get rid of one of the \'two\'s - maybe even both of them. And yes, \'battlements\' is more common than \'crenelated\'.
So how about: At either end, set into the ramparts, a fortified gateway surmounted by battlements rises proudly?

translatol
Local time: 07:22
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 4
Grading comment
This is what I came up with. "At both ends, two fortified gates stand proudly set into the ramparts." In the end it was better to simplify it and make it clear.

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Richard Benham: OK, but I would want to get rid of "crenelated". How about two fortified gateways, surmounted by battlements"? Also, I'd want to get rid a "two". One two is OK, but two twos is one too many (or one two too many).
7 mins
  -> Thank you very much for the improvements.

agree  Patrice: Richard, I suspect anyone who is really into castles will know or investigate "crenelated walls" -- a good castle glossary I found is at www.britcastles.com..and I know nothing about castles but had heard of crenellated walls. Patrice
1 hr
  -> Thank you very much. You're right about 'crenel(l)ated' as a technical term, but see Charlie Bavington's remark.

agree  writeaway
1 hr
  -> Thank you very much.

agree  suezen: but I would say 'at each end'
6 hrs
  -> Thank you very much. To me 'at each end' and 'at either end' are synonymous.

agree  eliyahug
10 hrs
  -> Thank you very much.

agree  Charlie Bavington: "at each end" is much better, "set into the ramparts" is spot on (IMHO!), I would go for the "battlements" option if this is just a bog standard tourist text.
10 hrs
  -> Thank you very much. I agree about 'battlements'.

agree  mportal
19 hrs
  -> Thnak you vey much. This has really been a team effort.
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13 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5
A ses deux extrémités se dressent fièrement les deux portes fortifiées crénelées
See comment below...


Explanation:
"Through the ramparts at either end pass the two crenellated, fortified gates"

Just one idea to help you on your way...

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Note added at 7 hrs 25 mins (2004-12-06 07:21:37 GMT)
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As RB points out, it\'s a shame to lose \'proudly\', so here\'s a second take on it:

\"Through the ramparts at either end pass two proud, crenellated fortified gateways\"

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Note added at 13 hrs 17 mins (2004-12-06 13:14:01 GMT)
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In reply to CB\'s comment about \'passing through\' --- well, it did sound OK when I wrote it, but I see what you mean.

However, I\'m not sure \'set into...\' is a lot better either; the ideas of \'standing proud(ly)\' and \'set into...\' seem to me on the face of it slightly contradictory. \'Passing\' at least has the merit of being neutral :-))

Tony M
France
Local time: 08:22
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 111

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
neutral  Richard Benham: Well yes, but how many Anglophones would understand the word "crenellated"? And what happened to "proudly"?
9 mins
  -> Thanks, RB! I always thought 'crenellated' was a common enough word, it's been in my own vocab for 35+ years! As for 'proudly', it got left out when I turned the sentence round, but my added note above might be a way to slip it back in!

neutral  Charlie Bavington: gateways passing through ramparts? Sounds slightly odd to me...
10 hrs
  -> Thanks, Charlie! I guess it sounded OK to me when I wrote it... ;-)
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