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arrêts rectilignes

English translation: in-lane stops

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15:19 May 18, 2005
French to English translations [PRO]
Transport / Transportation / Shipping
French term or phrase: arrêts rectilignes
This is used in a description of measures introduced to improve public transport: "Un maximum de couloirs a été créé avec des arrêts rectilignes, ce qui a permis d’avoir des horaires respectés"
Thanks for any suggestions!
JMcKechnie
Local time: 16:53
English translation:in-lane stops
Explanation:
If there are dedicated bus lanes, maybe they mean they don't need to have a bay for the bus to pull into to pick up/let down passengers, given that there should be no other traffic, i.e. the bus travels - and stops - in a straight line. This implies that the improvement in respect of timetables is because they have "un maximum de couloirs".

If, on the other hand, the buses travel amidst other traffic, the same configuration could apply, i.e. the bus stops in the stream of traffic, without pulling over into a bay. This means that apart from any traffic that pulls over from the adjacent lane ahead of the bus, it retains its place in the stream of traffic and can move on as soon as the traffic ahead moves, rather than be stuck waiting for some considerate driver behind to let it back out into the traffic.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 26 mins (2005-05-18 15:45:39 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Hey, I\'m quite pleased with my guesswork, even if the term does get so very few hits! Check out:
http://www.ci.bellevue.wa.us/departments/Transportation/pdf/...



--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 44 mins (2005-05-18 16:03:40 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

The above site suggests that \"in-lane stops\" and \"bus bulbs\" are different things, so something escapes me since the bus bulb described below achieves what I imagined as an \"in-lane stop\":

[From above site] : Three different bus stop configurations are found in the City of Bellevue: bus bulbs, IN-LANE STOPS, and pullouts …
IN-LANE STOPS are defined as those where buses stop in the actual travel lane. The travel lane is blocked while the bus is dropping off or boarding passengers. The majority of Metro’s transit stops in Bellevue are in-lane stops. Metro’s practice of stopping in-lane, even in high traffic settings like downtown Bellevue, is consistent with national and international practice in the transit industry. The reason for the standardization of this approach is to avoid delay associated with reentering the traffic stream any time the bus leaves the travel lane. Buses reentering the travel lane from bus pullouts reduce schedule reliability, add to operating costs, and reduce the quality of service for bus riders. This also is the source of motorist complaints and near miss accidents as other vehicles often ignore the state law requiring them to yield to emerging buses. Figure IX-2 depicts a typical in-lane stop.



Definition
A bus bulb is generally defined as a section of sidewalk that extends from the curb of a
parking lane to the edge of a through traffic lane. The bus bulb, as it is commonly known, is
sometimes referred to as a curb extension, a nub or a bus bulge. The extension of the curb
into a parking lane creates an additional space for pedestrians to walk and for passengers to
wait for a bus. The bulb can also provide additional space for bus passenger amenities such
as shelters, benches and landscaping to name a few. Attachment A shows a typical design for
a bus bulb.
A bus bulb is very different from a conventional bus stop in that passenger boarding and
alighting activity takes place in the street area now used for parking. This concept is unlike a
regular bus stop where passengers board and alight the bus from the curb next to the parking
lane. Bus bulbs are normally constructed in well-developed, mixed-use downtown or urban
settings. The location of these bulbs can be nearside on some streets, farside on others or
mid-block in some cases. Attachment B compares the design concept of a conventional bus
stop with that of a bus bulb
[www.mta.net/board/Items/2004/ 11_November/20041110OtherSectorGCItem8.pdf]

The difference appears to be that with an \"in-lane stop\" there is no curbside parking, whereas with a \"bulb stop\" the pedestrian pavement occupies part of the curbside parking area. Both would, I imagine, be \"arrêts rectilignes\".

The first site mentioned above is long to download when you don\'t have broadband, as I don\'t, but you might find it useful if you have a lot of this sort of stuff. It has good illustration of different kinds of bus stops, etc.
Selected response from:

xxxBourth
Local time: 17:53
Grading comment
Many thanks for your help and the reference info!
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
4 +1(bus) lanes with stops on straight sections (of the road)xxxCMJ_Trans
1 +3in-lane stopsxxxBourth


  

Answers


5 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +1
(bus) lanes with stops on straight sections (of the road)


Explanation:
it means that the vehicles do not have to stop on corners

xxxCMJ_Trans
Local time: 17:53
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 416

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Ker
8 mins
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

15 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 1/5Answerer confidence 1/5 peer agreement (net): +3
arrêts rectilignes
in-lane stops


Explanation:
If there are dedicated bus lanes, maybe they mean they don't need to have a bay for the bus to pull into to pick up/let down passengers, given that there should be no other traffic, i.e. the bus travels - and stops - in a straight line. This implies that the improvement in respect of timetables is because they have "un maximum de couloirs".

If, on the other hand, the buses travel amidst other traffic, the same configuration could apply, i.e. the bus stops in the stream of traffic, without pulling over into a bay. This means that apart from any traffic that pulls over from the adjacent lane ahead of the bus, it retains its place in the stream of traffic and can move on as soon as the traffic ahead moves, rather than be stuck waiting for some considerate driver behind to let it back out into the traffic.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 26 mins (2005-05-18 15:45:39 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Hey, I\'m quite pleased with my guesswork, even if the term does get so very few hits! Check out:
http://www.ci.bellevue.wa.us/departments/Transportation/pdf/...



--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 44 mins (2005-05-18 16:03:40 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

The above site suggests that \"in-lane stops\" and \"bus bulbs\" are different things, so something escapes me since the bus bulb described below achieves what I imagined as an \"in-lane stop\":

[From above site] : Three different bus stop configurations are found in the City of Bellevue: bus bulbs, IN-LANE STOPS, and pullouts …
IN-LANE STOPS are defined as those where buses stop in the actual travel lane. The travel lane is blocked while the bus is dropping off or boarding passengers. The majority of Metro’s transit stops in Bellevue are in-lane stops. Metro’s practice of stopping in-lane, even in high traffic settings like downtown Bellevue, is consistent with national and international practice in the transit industry. The reason for the standardization of this approach is to avoid delay associated with reentering the traffic stream any time the bus leaves the travel lane. Buses reentering the travel lane from bus pullouts reduce schedule reliability, add to operating costs, and reduce the quality of service for bus riders. This also is the source of motorist complaints and near miss accidents as other vehicles often ignore the state law requiring them to yield to emerging buses. Figure IX-2 depicts a typical in-lane stop.



Definition
A bus bulb is generally defined as a section of sidewalk that extends from the curb of a
parking lane to the edge of a through traffic lane. The bus bulb, as it is commonly known, is
sometimes referred to as a curb extension, a nub or a bus bulge. The extension of the curb
into a parking lane creates an additional space for pedestrians to walk and for passengers to
wait for a bus. The bulb can also provide additional space for bus passenger amenities such
as shelters, benches and landscaping to name a few. Attachment A shows a typical design for
a bus bulb.
A bus bulb is very different from a conventional bus stop in that passenger boarding and
alighting activity takes place in the street area now used for parking. This concept is unlike a
regular bus stop where passengers board and alight the bus from the curb next to the parking
lane. Bus bulbs are normally constructed in well-developed, mixed-use downtown or urban
settings. The location of these bulbs can be nearside on some streets, farside on others or
mid-block in some cases. Attachment B compares the design concept of a conventional bus
stop with that of a bus bulb
[www.mta.net/board/Items/2004/ 11_November/20041110OtherSectorGCItem8.pdf]

The difference appears to be that with an \"in-lane stop\" there is no curbside parking, whereas with a \"bulb stop\" the pedestrian pavement occupies part of the curbside parking area. Both would, I imagine, be \"arrêts rectilignes\".

The first site mentioned above is long to download when you don\'t have broadband, as I don\'t, but you might find it useful if you have a lot of this sort of stuff. It has good illustration of different kinds of bus stops, etc.


xxxBourth
Local time: 17:53
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 487
Grading comment
Many thanks for your help and the reference info!

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  xxxCMJ_Trans: this could be right but note that buses have priority even on leaving their stop
1 min
  -> Supposedly ....

agree  Josephine79: seems logical - it would save time - and I regret to say that although buses have priority when pulling out IN THEORY, not having to pull in and out at all is more likely to be effective.
14 mins

agree  Catherine Christaki
1 hr
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