taper au près

English translation: Slapping, or slamming, into the waves when close hauled

GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
French term or phrase:taper au près
English translation:Slapping, or slamming, into the waves when close hauled
Entered by: Anita Planchon

16:05 Jun 12, 2018
French to English translations [PRO]
Tech/Engineering - Transport / Transportation / Shipping / Boat design
French term or phrase: taper au près
First and foremost it was a project for a rapid sailing yacht that must absolutely not « taper au
près » - a very difficult condition for the new lengthened version. If she was to be fast, she had to be relatively
light and « raide à la toile » - and if light, she might slam too hard.
kashew
France
Local time: 03:08
Slapping into the waves when close hauled
Explanation:
It's a bit clunky, but I find French often has much neater terms for sailing than English. Essentially, "taper au près" is the phenomenon of slapping in a bumpy way into the waves when sailing close to the wind. Other ways of saying it are "smacking in to the waves", "slamming into the waves", "thumping into the waves", "pounding into the waves" etc. Some boats do this more than others and it depends largely on their hull design (though sail and rigging design also play a part). I've linked a couple of yachtie forums where this phenomenon is being discussed in all these ways below.

This article also calls it "hobby horsing, but in years around yachties in Australia, I have never heard that term: http://www.bytecii.com/tips-and-tricks-tracking-upwind-in-wa...
Selected response from:

Anita Planchon
Australia
Local time: 03:08
Grading comment
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer



Summary of answers provided
5 +2Slapping into the waves when close hauled
Anita Planchon


  

Answers


1 hr   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): +2
Slapping into the waves when close hauled


Explanation:
It's a bit clunky, but I find French often has much neater terms for sailing than English. Essentially, "taper au près" is the phenomenon of slapping in a bumpy way into the waves when sailing close to the wind. Other ways of saying it are "smacking in to the waves", "slamming into the waves", "thumping into the waves", "pounding into the waves" etc. Some boats do this more than others and it depends largely on their hull design (though sail and rigging design also play a part). I've linked a couple of yachtie forums where this phenomenon is being discussed in all these ways below.

This article also calls it "hobby horsing, but in years around yachties in Australia, I have never heard that term: http://www.bytecii.com/tips-and-tricks-tracking-upwind-in-wa...


    Reference: http://www.multihulls4us.com/forums/showthread.php?3346-Poun...
    Reference: http://www.cruisersforum.com/forums/f48/hull-slap-is-it-a-pr...
Anita Planchon
Australia
Local time: 03:08
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 8
Notes to answerer
Asker: Many thanks, Anita.

Asker: thanks both, i think i'll go for slam.

Asker: Thanks again!


Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  philgoddard: You could leave out "into the waves".
12 mins

agree  Nikki Scott-Despaigne: Funnily enough, I've always heard "slam" not "slap" here; "slams close-hauled", or just "slams upwind". "Pound" I've heard too, although generally with an object, but that may just be me. ;-)
56 mins
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