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bourrelingue

English translation: See comment below...

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09:35 Feb 18, 2005
French to English translations [PRO]
Tech/Engineering - Transport / Transportation / Shipping
French term or phrase: bourrelingue
part of a yacht
Neil Crockford
Local time: 19:29
English translation:See comment below...
Explanation:
I can only imagine it is a typo for 'bourlingue' --- according to GDT, this might perhaps come from the verb 'bourlinguer', though that would make it more a charcateristic than a part of a yacht: perhaps 'roll' or 'rolling'?

français

bourlinguer v.
Définition :
Rouler bord sur bord de façon chaotique.
En parlant d'un navire, rouler bord sur bord ou tanguer de manière désordonnée.

Domaine(s) : - marine
navigation maritime
anglais

labour, to

or 'labouring' ?

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Note added at 1 hr 25 mins (2005-02-18 11:01:19 GMT)
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Well, now that you\'ve given us some more context, it\'s a bit easier to make at least some kind of a guess.

I imagine this is realted to \'bourrelet\', a fender, and I wouldn\'t mind betting this is some kind of \'rubbing band\' --- is this a GRP boat? If so, the rubbing band commonly fufils the dual rôle of covering the join between the deck and hull mouldings; so having cracks in the plastic hull below this line would certainly be a feasible scenario.

Sorry I can\'t be more help, but if I come across anything more in my own glossaries, I\'ll get back to you....

Selected response from:

Tony M
France
Local time: 20:29
Grading comment
Thanks for the help. This looks most likely.
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
5"cracks under the capping rail" or "cracks under the rubbing strike"
irat56
3See comment below...
Tony M
2some sort of small sail
David Goward


Discussion entries: 3





  

Answers


12 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 2/5Answerer confidence 2/5
some sort of small sail


Explanation:
According to Clouet "Dictionnaire Technique Maritime", a "bourlingueur" is a familiar term for an ardent sailor and comes from "'bourlingue', nom d'une petite voile".
Unfortunately, he does not give the same of that sail in English.
Is Nikki about?

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Note added at 19 mins (2005-02-18 09:54:47 GMT)
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Apparently it\'s also the name of a small boat made by Jeanneau that could, I suppose, be used as a tender for a large yacht. Any more context, Neil?

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Note added at 19 mins (2005-02-18 09:55:27 GMT)
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See here for the Jeanneau Bourlingue: http://www.devamarine.co.uk/rigiflex.htm


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Note added at 33 mins (2005-02-18 10:08:52 GMT)
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In view of the extra info, it\'s not any of my ideas then!! :-(

David Goward
France
Local time: 20:29
Works in field
Native speaker of: English
PRO pts in category: 24
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

10 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5
See comment below...


Explanation:
I can only imagine it is a typo for 'bourlingue' --- according to GDT, this might perhaps come from the verb 'bourlinguer', though that would make it more a charcateristic than a part of a yacht: perhaps 'roll' or 'rolling'?

français

bourlinguer v.
Définition :
Rouler bord sur bord de façon chaotique.
En parlant d'un navire, rouler bord sur bord ou tanguer de manière désordonnée.

Domaine(s) : - marine
navigation maritime
anglais

labour, to

or 'labouring' ?

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 1 hr 25 mins (2005-02-18 11:01:19 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Well, now that you\'ve given us some more context, it\'s a bit easier to make at least some kind of a guess.

I imagine this is realted to \'bourrelet\', a fender, and I wouldn\'t mind betting this is some kind of \'rubbing band\' --- is this a GRP boat? If so, the rubbing band commonly fufils the dual rôle of covering the join between the deck and hull mouldings; so having cracks in the plastic hull below this line would certainly be a feasible scenario.

Sorry I can\'t be more help, but if I come across anything more in my own glossaries, I\'ll get back to you....



Tony M
France
Local time: 20:29
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 202
Grading comment
Thanks for the help. This looks most likely.
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

3 days1 hr   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5
"cracks under the capping rail" or "cracks under the rubbing strike"


Explanation:
Sory to be so late, but I just got the answer from the yacht company. They say "bourlingue" is a word for many areas on the sides of the hull, so, in the context they suggest one or the other.
Hope it may help!

irat56
France
Local time: 20:29
Native speaker of: Native in FrenchFrench
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)




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