Top-Box

English translation: top box

GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
German term or phrase:Top-Box
English translation:top box
Entered by: Dan McCrosky (X)

16:34 Nov 25, 2006
German to English translations [PRO]
Marketing - Advertising / Public Relations / Survey questionnaire analysis
German term or phrase: Top-Box
I know this sounds like the old question: "What is the English name for a "Handy", but it is German and might possibly not be used with the same meaning in real English.

The term "Top-Box", usually plural, is used in marketing research German. It has something to do with the analysis of responses to an online MR questionnaire. It may refer to the one or two checkboxes among the 3 – 5 question answer checkboxes that the market researcher feels are most important or perhaps where the marketer in question scored the best in the survey. However, it might also just refer to the graphic positioning of the results for a particular question for a presentation.

Here is one example from my text:

“XXXXX wird von fast allen Befragten als eine etablierte and bekannte Marke angesehen (Top Boxes von ≥ 96% in allen sieben Zielgruppen).”

I have tried Google searches for various combinations of, as well as the singular and plural forms of, “top box”, “major boxes”, “important box”, “best box”, “best result”, “top score”, “primary box”, and “key box”, with no conclusive results.

I have also tried searches for “Top Boxes” and “Top-Boxes” in German, hoping to find a German site with an English translation, but the only ones I have found so far also used “Top Boxes” for their English translations. I had the feeling from the quality of the English translations that they may have just thought “Top Boxes” must be right without checking it.

Thanks in advance for your help!
Dan McCrosky (X)
Local time: 17:12
top box rating
Explanation:
"I was poking around in Google today and came upon an interesting article in the October, 2000 issue of the CustomerSat.com monthly newsletter (appropriately entitled "CustomerSat.com Connections" about the relevance of using top box ratings, bottom box ratings and mean scores."

http://www.marketresearchtech.com/

Top box, bottom box, and mean score are different ways of evaluating performance of a rated attribute. “Top one box” is the percentage of customers who give the attribute the highest rating, e.g., 10 on a 10-point scale or 5 on a 5-point scale. “Top two box” is the percentage who give the attribute either the highest rating or second highest rating on the scale; similarly for “top three” box. For 5-point scales, top-one and top-two box percentages are most often used; for 10-point scales, top-two and top-three (rating scores of 8, 9, or 10) box percentages are more often used. (In this article, we will use “top box” to refer to any of top one, top two, or top three box.) “Bottom box” percentages are the same for the lowest ratings of the scale.
http://www.customersat.com/Resources/Newsletter/archives/oct...
Selected response from:

Kim Metzger
Mexico
Local time: 10:12
Grading comment
Firstly, I believe it is not necessary for me to try to decide between “results” and “rating” here. For the glossary, I will just write the term lower case and without the hyphen that my client usually used.

I haven’t used the Kudoz system in quite a while, but I presume the rules are still the same:

First come, first serve! The first right answer gets the points unless a later answer is very much more helpful.

This would mean I should chose David’s answer even though Kim’s answer gave me an extra serving of unexpected and possibly even unintended help.

Soooo, if I’m going to chose Kim’s answer, I’d better be ready to justify my choice. I was first angry with myself because my own research had not yielded the sites referenced by David and Kim and started rechecking the phrase “top box” using the three domains they referenced. I got 40 or so hits (although many were duplicates). I still don’t know how I missed these references. Probably my hit lists were too cluttered with “TV set top boxes”.

Unfortunately however, the .ihi.org sites only used the term in a similar manner to my client’s usage without explaining it much. Kim’s .customersat.com sites did quite a good job of explaining the usage of the term, including its usage in the reporting of survey results. I found this site especially helpful: http://www.customersat.com/Resources/Newsletter/archives/feb_issue.html .

That is why I have to give the four points to Kim, but thanks to all the others and especially to David.


4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer



Summary of answers provided
3 +2top box rating
Kim Metzger
4best results / top results
swisstell
4top box results
David Moore
2top fields/places
Regina Eichstaedter


Discussion entries: 1





  

Answers


6 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
best boxes
best results / top results


Explanation:
at times it is best to go back to basics and, after all, that seems to be the meaning here.

swisstell
Italy
Local time: 17:12
Works in field
Native speaker of: German
PRO pts in category: 54
Notes to answerer
Asker: Could very well be right and I will do so unless someone comes up with a certified marketing research jargon term. My customer is an ad agency who will be hard enough to convince as it is that “top boxes” is not the right English term.

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14 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 2/5Answerer confidence 2/5
best boxes
top fields/places


Explanation:
mir scheinen das Kästchen/Plätze/Felder auf einem Fragebogen zu sein - wie sagt man das am besten in Englisch? Das sind ja auch "boxes"...

Regina Eichstaedter
Local time: 17:12
Native speaker of: Native in GermanGerman
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24 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5 peer agreement (net): +2
top box rating


Explanation:
"I was poking around in Google today and came upon an interesting article in the October, 2000 issue of the CustomerSat.com monthly newsletter (appropriately entitled "CustomerSat.com Connections" about the relevance of using top box ratings, bottom box ratings and mean scores."

http://www.marketresearchtech.com/

Top box, bottom box, and mean score are different ways of evaluating performance of a rated attribute. “Top one box” is the percentage of customers who give the attribute the highest rating, e.g., 10 on a 10-point scale or 5 on a 5-point scale. “Top two box” is the percentage who give the attribute either the highest rating or second highest rating on the scale; similarly for “top three” box. For 5-point scales, top-one and top-two box percentages are most often used; for 10-point scales, top-two and top-three (rating scores of 8, 9, or 10) box percentages are more often used. (In this article, we will use “top box” to refer to any of top one, top two, or top three box.) “Bottom box” percentages are the same for the lowest ratings of the scale.
http://www.customersat.com/Resources/Newsletter/archives/oct...


Kim Metzger
Mexico
Local time: 10:12
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 86
Grading comment
Firstly, I believe it is not necessary for me to try to decide between “results” and “rating” here. For the glossary, I will just write the term lower case and without the hyphen that my client usually used.

I haven’t used the Kudoz system in quite a while, but I presume the rules are still the same:

First come, first serve! The first right answer gets the points unless a later answer is very much more helpful.

This would mean I should chose David’s answer even though Kim’s answer gave me an extra serving of unexpected and possibly even unintended help.

Soooo, if I’m going to chose Kim’s answer, I’d better be ready to justify my choice. I was first angry with myself because my own research had not yielded the sites referenced by David and Kim and started rechecking the phrase “top box” using the three domains they referenced. I got 40 or so hits (although many were duplicates). I still don’t know how I missed these references. Probably my hit lists were too cluttered with “TV set top boxes”.

Unfortunately however, the .ihi.org sites only used the term in a similar manner to my client’s usage without explaining it much. Kim’s .customersat.com sites did quite a good job of explaining the usage of the term, including its usage in the reporting of survey results. I found this site especially helpful: http://www.customersat.com/Resources/Newsletter/archives/feb_issue.html .

That is why I have to give the four points to Kim, but thanks to all the others and especially to David.

Notes to answerer
Asker: Your answer is a big help because in other sections of my text the agency uses the expression “Top Boxes (1+2)” which I now understand to mean “Top two boxes”, thanks to your reference.


Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Steffen Walter
28 mins

agree  Textklick: Well researched and well reasoned. Don't worry, Dan - they should know if they are an ad agency.
7 hrs
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14 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
best boxes
top box results


Explanation:
Clearly, a marketing expression the Germans have borrowed from English (now, WHERE have I heard that before???).
This is how it is defined in the trade, it seems:

[PPT] www.ihi.org/Ihi/Files/IMPACT/Innovation/MedSug/200...File Format: Microsoft Powerpoint - View as HTML
For which categories do you have mostly “top box “ results (strongly agree – 5’s)? For which categories do you have the most room for improvement (disagree ...



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Note added at 15 mins (2006-11-25 16:50:19 GMT)
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If you look at the average survey form, you'll find the "5-pointers" are always the "top boxes"...

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Note added at 1 hr (2006-11-25 17:39:01 GMT)
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Sorry Dan, dunno what happened there; try this one:

http://www.ihi.org/Ihi/Files/IMPACT/Innovation/MedSug/2005_1...

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Note added at 1 hr (2006-11-25 17:40:33 GMT)
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See page 13.

David Moore
Local time: 17:12
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 39
Notes to answerer
Asker: Is your reference correctly displayed here, or is something missing after the “200”? I can’t get it to open.

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