Schützentonne

English translation: gunner's position

GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
German term or phrase:Schützentonne
English translation:gunner's position
Entered by: Yorkshireman

09:28 Jan 15, 2015
German to English translations [PRO]
Tech/Engineering - Aerospace / Aviation / Space / Simulationssysteme
German term or phrase: Schützentonne
"Zugang zu den Schützentonnen"
pbac
Local time: 19:32
gunner's position
Explanation:
Difficult to say without more context, although, Schützen in this case is quite probably gunner.

The Schützentonne - for example in a WW II Flying Fortress or Lancaster heavy bomber - would be the drum-shaped rotating section of the (dorsal) gun turret in which the gunner sat.

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Note added at 1 hr (2015-01-15 10:45:08 GMT)
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"Hatchway to the gunner's position" (gun turret) would be the correct description for a WW II plane with gun turrets.

The gun positions on a Lancaster would be the nose turret (front, below the cockpit), rear turret (below the tail fin), dorsal turret (on the top of the fuselage, about half way between the cockpit and tail). Some aircraft also had belly turrets at the bottom of the fuselage. Manned turrets were partially replaced by electrically powered, remote controlled "barbettes" in later WW II aircraft (like the B-29 Superfortress).

In the RAF, the "drum" in which the gunner sat was usually called a "dustbin"

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Note added at 1 hr (2015-01-15 10:48:05 GMT)
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Almost all you could ever wish to know about aircraft armament:

http://tinyurl.com/pjrou27

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Note added at 4 hrs (2015-01-15 14:12:33 GMT)
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This describes the "drum":
The turret consisted of a circular drum attached to an inner ring which revolved on roller bearings running in a fixed outer ring.
Selected response from:

Yorkshireman
Germany
Local time: 19:32
Grading comment
thank you,

customer decided to use "gun pit"
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer



Summary of answers provided
2gunner's position
Yorkshireman
2safety capsule
freekfluweel


  

Answers


3 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 2/5Answerer confidence 2/5
safety capsule


Explanation:
not much context...

freekfluweel
Netherlands
Local time: 19:32
Native speaker of: Native in DutchDutch
PRO pts in category: 4
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

27 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 2/5Answerer confidence 2/5
gunner's position


Explanation:
Difficult to say without more context, although, Schützen in this case is quite probably gunner.

The Schützentonne - for example in a WW II Flying Fortress or Lancaster heavy bomber - would be the drum-shaped rotating section of the (dorsal) gun turret in which the gunner sat.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 1 hr (2015-01-15 10:45:08 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

"Hatchway to the gunner's position" (gun turret) would be the correct description for a WW II plane with gun turrets.

The gun positions on a Lancaster would be the nose turret (front, below the cockpit), rear turret (below the tail fin), dorsal turret (on the top of the fuselage, about half way between the cockpit and tail). Some aircraft also had belly turrets at the bottom of the fuselage. Manned turrets were partially replaced by electrically powered, remote controlled "barbettes" in later WW II aircraft (like the B-29 Superfortress).

In the RAF, the "drum" in which the gunner sat was usually called a "dustbin"

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 1 hr (2015-01-15 10:48:05 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Almost all you could ever wish to know about aircraft armament:

http://tinyurl.com/pjrou27

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 4 hrs (2015-01-15 14:12:33 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

This describes the "drum":
The turret consisted of a circular drum attached to an inner ring which revolved on roller bearings running in a fixed outer ring.

Yorkshireman
Germany
Local time: 19:32
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 8
Grading comment
thank you,

customer decided to use "gun pit"

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
neutral  freekfluweel: Interesting take, bullets in space...? (Pigs in space -going ballistic- however do exist...)
6 mins
  -> Nobody said it was a spaceship :-)
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)



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