Fundkomplexe

English translation: archaeological [dig] sites

00:04 Jul 17, 2017
German to English translations [PRO]
Social Sciences - Archaeology
German term or phrase: Fundkomplexe
I can find "find complexes" in use, but exclusively on sites/in papers by German speakers, which makes me suspect it's Denglisch... If so, what would be the way to say this in English?
Emma Rault
United Kingdom
Local time: 02:18
English translation:archaeological [dig] sites
Explanation:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Excavation_(archaeology)

Funde = archaeological remains OR finds
(not 'findings', which come from research)

See also 'hoard': https://en.oxforddictionaries.com/definition/hoard


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Note added at 2 days9 mins (2017-07-19 00:13:52 GMT)
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Mr Goddard is of the opinion that this duplicates 'sites'. Stung by his criticism, I have returned to expand on my original suggestion.
On offer are 'archaeological sites' and 'archaeological digs'. The former suggests areas of interest, while the latter is more specifically areas where excavations have taken place. Of course, neither implies that anything was found. That is why I supplemented my answer with 'remains' and 'hoard'. I was reminded of this question by the news on BBC tonight which referred to an 'Anglo-Saxon haul'. So, it may be more complex than just a 'site'. See herbalchemist's thoughtful contribution.
And after all, the lead answer here merely replicates your own proposal in the source term box without elaborating on it.
Selected response from:

Lancashireman
United Kingdom
Local time: 02:18
Grading comment
Thank you!
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer



Summary of answers provided
4 +2sites
David Hollywood
4 +1archaeological [dig] sites
Lancashireman


Discussion entries: 6





  

Answers


37 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +2
sites


Explanation:
I would say

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Note added at 53 mins (2017-07-17 00:57:30 GMT)
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Fundkomplexe der unteren Weser und der unteren Ems aus der römischen Kaiserzeit in Hinblick auf eine mögliche Funktion als Landeplatz untersucht werden

sites located in the lower Weser and lower Ems region in Roman emperial times should be considered as possible landing sites

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Note added at 53 mins (2017-07-17 00:58:12 GMT)
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let's see what others have to say but that's the idea

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Note added at 1 hr (2017-07-17 01:49:40 GMT)
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German is ovelly wordy not to say vebose, so simplify

David Hollywood
Local time: 23:18
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  philgoddard
2 hrs
  -> thanks Phil

agree  Armorel Young: yes, I think in this context it is as simple as that
7 hrs
  -> thanks Armorel
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1 hr   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +1
archaeological [dig] sites


Explanation:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Excavation_(archaeology)

Funde = archaeological remains OR finds
(not 'findings', which come from research)

See also 'hoard': https://en.oxforddictionaries.com/definition/hoard


--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2 days9 mins (2017-07-19 00:13:52 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Mr Goddard is of the opinion that this duplicates 'sites'. Stung by his criticism, I have returned to expand on my original suggestion.
On offer are 'archaeological sites' and 'archaeological digs'. The former suggests areas of interest, while the latter is more specifically areas where excavations have taken place. Of course, neither implies that anything was found. That is why I supplemented my answer with 'remains' and 'hoard'. I was reminded of this question by the news on BBC tonight which referred to an 'Anglo-Saxon haul'. So, it may be more complex than just a 'site'. See herbalchemist's thoughtful contribution.
And after all, the lead answer here merely replicates your own proposal in the source term box without elaborating on it.

Lancashireman
United Kingdom
Local time: 02:18
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 16
Grading comment
Thank you!

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Herbmione Granger: I also see "archaeological site complex"
4 hrs
  -> Thanks. Your ref suggesting that Komplex (DE) translates as complex (EN) is convincing. I'm surprised that current sentiment is running in favour of the argument "it's as simple as that".

neutral  philgoddard: I don't see why you've posted this as a separate answer. "Archeological" and "dig" are redundant.
17 hrs
  -> It's a bit more complex than that. // See added note.
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