Gejohle

English translation: howling

GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
German term or phrase:Gejohle
English translation:howling
Entered by: Kim Metzger

22:20 May 2, 2003
German to English translations [PRO]
Art/Literary
German term or phrase: Gejohle
Jeden Abend macht er sich an eine andere Alte heran und schleppt sie mit auf die Bude. Die ganze Nacht kriegst du kein Auge zu bei diesem Gekreisch und **Gejohle**.
Fantutti (X)
Local time: 23:41
howling
Explanation:
I think that comes closest to the German.
Selected response from:

Kim Metzger
Mexico
Local time: 01:41
Grading comment
All suggestions were impressive. I picked Kim's because
1st) it came pretty close to the German text,
2nd) I liked the comical aspect, and
3rd) because it did n o t contain the element of pleasure or joy. How much fun could it possibly be to do it to somebody who stinks up the atmosphere?
Well, enjoy your dinner, everybody, and thanks to Kim and the whole lot of you!
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer



Summary of answers provided
5 +2with all that shrieking
Anglo-German (X)
4 +2squealing / hooplah
William Stein
4 +2to bawl / bawling
swisstell
5howling
Ino66 (X)
3 +1howling
Kim Metzger


  

Answers


1 min   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5 peer agreement (net): +1
howling


Explanation:
I think that comes closest to the German.

Kim Metzger
Mexico
Local time: 01:41
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 21908
Grading comment
All suggestions were impressive. I picked Kim's because
1st) it came pretty close to the German text,
2nd) I liked the comical aspect, and
3rd) because it did n o t contain the element of pleasure or joy. How much fun could it possibly be to do it to somebody who stinks up the atmosphere?
Well, enjoy your dinner, everybody, and thanks to Kim and the whole lot of you!

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  mezacc
5 mins

neutral  swisstell: coyotes howl - and there are not many of those in Germany
4 hrs

neutral  Anglo-German (X): Unless ... the so-called author was thinking of "Da werden Weiber zu Hyänen" ;-)
5 hrs
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3 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5
howling


Explanation:
derogatory use of the word

Ino66 (X)
Native speaker of: Native in GreekGreek
PRO pts in pair: 84
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11 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +2
to bawl / bawling


Explanation:
screaming and bawling

would be my version. Real loud!

swisstell
Italy
Local time: 08:41
Native speaker of: German
PRO pts in pair: 3377

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  OlafK
1 hr
  -> thanks OlafK

neutral  Anglo-German (X): yeah, but only if he hits them ;-)!
1 hr
  -> amazing the objections some people come up with!

agree  Rowan Morrell: I don't go along with Christiane's comment. I think "bawling" would be fine, whether violence is involved or not.
1 hr
  -> thanks, that's what I tought too
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30 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): +2
with all that shrieking


Explanation:
Gekreisch und Gejohle verstehe ich als alliterierendes Hendiadyoin. Ein Adjektiv im Engl. reicht völlig aus, verstärkt durch "all that".
Howling passt doch eher zu Wölfen ...
und bawling hat doch in diesem sexuellen Kontext nichts verloren?
"Shriek" kann man dagegen auch vor und zum Vergnügen, nicht nur aus Wut :-)

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2003-05-03 04:00:34 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Ich meinte natürlich nicht Adjektiv, sondern substantiviertes Verb :-) bzw. Partizip Präsens.

Anglo-German (X)
Germany
Local time: 08:41
Native speaker of: Native in GermanGerman
PRO pts in pair: 203

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  GreenTara: To me, "bawsling" is strictly a synonym for "crying" (with tears!), so I like combining both into "shrieking. -- Susanne
2 hrs
  -> kreisch ;-)!

agree  Cilian O'Tuama: shrieking (sounds more like a sound a female makes, though)
3 hrs
  -> Why though? We are talking about "die Alte" aren't we?

neutral  swisstell: shrieking and what? Remember, there are to verbs
4 hrs
  -> Shrieking and nothing, "e-rich" - it's a hendiadyoin.
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3 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +2
squealing / hooplah


Explanation:
Lovers squeal with pleasure. Hooplah, which means "excited commotion", would be another good option here.

William Stein
Costa Rica
Local time: 00:41
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 1734

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Chris Hopley: Hooplah is good.
8 mins

agree  Anglo-German (X): I like squealing :-)
1 hr
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