füsilieren

English translation: fusillade

GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
German term or phrase:füsilieren
English translation:fusillade
Entered by: Fantutti (X)

04:00 Jan 29, 2004
German to English translations [PRO]
Art/Literary
German term or phrase: füsilieren
Die Jesuiten suchten von 1588 -1768 einen christlich - kommunistischen Staat in Paraguay zu verwirklichen, aber schließlich wurden sie von einer weltlichen Macht **füsiliert**.

Is 'füsilieren' a military term?

Thanks for your help!!
Fantutti (X)
Local time: 22:32
fusilladed
Explanation:
sounds odd but the word does exist, Webster says "to attack or shoot down by simultaneous or rapidly successive gunfire", so depending how esoteric you are willing to wax....
Selected response from:

Jonathan MacKerron
Grading comment
Yes, 'fusillade' sounds odd, but so does the German 'füsilieren'. Yes, and it's meant figuratively, in both languages. Thank you, John, and all the others for your kind help!!
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer



Summary of answers provided
3 +11destroy/wipe out
Kim Metzger
4 +1backing (Kim's answer) for the 'figurative' interpretation of fusileren.
writeaway
5s.u
Brandis (X)
4 +1gunned down
Alexander Schleber
4eliminate
Textklick
4shot to death
Roddy Stegemann
3execute (by a firing squad) / shoot
ntext
2 +1fusilladed
Jonathan MacKerron


  

Answers


5 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5 peer agreement (net): +11
füsilieren
destroy/wipe out


Explanation:
One definition of füsilieren is to execute with a firing squad. They were all shot by firing squads? I doubt it. I'd say this is meant figuratively - they were wiped out by a worldly power.

Kim Metzger
Mexico
Local time: 00:32
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 21896

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  writeaway
4 mins

agree  EdithK
9 mins

agree  Johanna Timm, PhD
24 mins

agree  vishoy
43 mins

agree  marina2002
2 hrs

agree  IanW (X): Yes - (Incidentally, a "gangbang" - Mr. Bandi?!! I suggest you change your comment or delete it altogether.)
2 hrs

agree  Dierk Widmann: Has to be figurative.
4 hrs

agree  Hans G. Liepert
4 hrs

agree  John Speese: Agree, or even 'eliminated' for yet another possibility.
7 hrs

agree  Lori Dendy-Molz: The references I've found say they were expelled, which fits with "wiped out".
7 hrs

agree  Endre Both
12 hrs
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7 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5
füsilieren
execute (by a firing squad) / shoot


Explanation:
That's what the dictionary says.


    Der kleine Muret-Sanders
ntext
United States
Local time: 00:32
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish, Native in GermanGerman
PRO pts in pair: 2954

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
neutral  writeaway: from the context, it almost has to be in the figurative sense (blown away).
4 mins
  -> Sounds reasonable. My knowledge of 15th century Paraguayan history is spotty. ;)
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10 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5
füsilieren
s.u


Explanation:
I honestly do not know the pre-history of Paraguay, but
füsilieren = to execute by firing squad, which could mean to be eradicated or eliminated using some kind of violence (could have various forms), historically through firing.
Ref: Collins English - German and German-English Dict. it isan old Military term.

Brandis (X)
Local time: 07:32
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish, Native in GermanGerman
PRO pts in pair: 41

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
neutral  writeaway: probably came from French 'fusiller' (also in verb form). look at the context (time span etc.)-really has to be in the figurative sense here.the words 'schließlich + weltlich make an actual shooting unlikely+it would have been more of a massacre
3 mins
  -> well, there is also a fusilier
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34 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
shot to death


Explanation:
As the shooting probably did not take place until the middle of the 18th century, one can assume a fairly sophisticated level of musketry. Thus, I find nothing wrong with the notion that they were eliminated by gunfire. It would not have to be a formal firing squad, but then again why not? In the end it would depend on the size of their colony. Many Jesuit colonies the world over were quite small.

Roddy Stegemann
United States
Local time: 22:32
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 285

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Sonja Schuberth-Kreutzer: füsilieren heute = erschießen. Vor Napoleon waren Füsiliere die kleineren Soldaten (kleiner als die Musketiere, deshalb kürzere (und dadurch weniger zielgenaue) Gewehre, weil sie die langen Musketen mangels Größe nicht laden konnten)
1 hr

disagree  Hans G. Liepert: The Jesuits in Paraguay haven't been shot (though shooting is very popular since the upcoming of black powder in the 16th century)
3 hrs
  -> So what happened to them, dearest Hans? Do you have a reference to back you up? Vainly I have looked for your entry below, but could not find it.
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2 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +1
backing (Kim's answer) for the 'figurative' interpretation of fusileren.


Explanation:
Apparently, the Jesuits were actually expelled. There is no mention of a massacre, just a 'war' against the Jesuits led by several European countries. The whole text is far too long to paste in here.

The rest is known. On 2 April, 1767, Charles III of Spain, weak and duped, signed the edict which decreed the exile of the Jesuits from the Spanish possessions in America. It was the death-warrant of the Reductions of Paraguay. The expulsion was carried out by force by the Governor of La Plata, Marquess of Bucareli, in the most brutal manner. "The Jesuits in Psraguay, at least, by their conduct in their last public act, most amply vindicated their loyalty to the Spanish crown.... Nothing would have been easier, depleted as the viceroyalty was at the time of troops, than to have defied the forces which Bucareli had at his disposal and to have set up a Jesuit State, which would have taxed the utmost resources of the Spanish crown to overcome" . . . [but] "they made no fight, nor offered any resistance, allowing themselves to be taken as the sheep is seized by the butcher" (Cunninghame Graham, loc. cit., 267). The Jesuit Province of Paraguay numbered at that time 564 members, 12 colleges, 1 university, 1 novitiate, 3 houses for conducting retreats, 2 residences, 57 Reductions, and 113,716 Christian Indians. The leave-taking from the Indians was heart-rending. In vain they pleaded in the most fervent manner to be allowed to keep their Fathers or to be assured that they would return. They never returned.




--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2004-01-29 06:29:13 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

What was \'wiped out\', \'destroyed\' was a lot of the work the Jesuits had done, not the Jesuits themselves.


    Reference: http://www.newadvent.org/cathen/12688b.htm
writeaway
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 1175

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
neutral  Roddy Stegemann: A war without massacre in the New World is not something I am very familiar with.
3 hrs
  -> what war? how about providing a ref that talks about a war in Paraguay with a massacre of the Jesuits?

neutral  Textklick: A war in the New World is not something I am very familiar with.
3 hrs
  -> what war? ditto my remark about providing a reference to back your opinion.

agree  Kim Metzger: Nice historical reference. "At war" in the sense of political machinations.
10 hrs
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3 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +1
gunned down


Explanation:
LIterally "fusielieren" means to excute by firing squad, which doesn't fit the sentence syntax. "gunned down" might be an alternative.

Alexander Schleber
Belgium
Local time: 07:32
Native speaker of: Native in GermanGerman, Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 2389

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Roddy Stegemann: Yes, this would also be more appropriate.
1 hr
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4 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 2/5Answerer confidence 2/5 peer agreement (net): +1
füsilieren
fusilladed


Explanation:
sounds odd but the word does exist, Webster says "to attack or shoot down by simultaneous or rapidly successive gunfire", so depending how esoteric you are willing to wax....

Jonathan MacKerron
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 5577
Grading comment
Yes, 'fusillade' sounds odd, but so does the German 'füsilieren'. Yes, and it's meant figuratively, in both languages. Thank you, John, and all the others for your kind help!!

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Gareth McMillan: Absolutely, If an exact parallel word already exists in the target language I would tend to use it in this context as the implications are also identical. Also the "firing squad" implies a "cold blooded" deliberate removal of an unwanted presence.
1 hr
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6 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
füsilieren
eliminate


Explanation:
Given the conflicting evidence of numbers, availability of gun powder etc. this seems to cover all eventualities and the obviously figurative meaning. Also clear and concise in a cool, calm and reasoned Jesuit manner.

Not for the glossary, though, as figurative.

Good luck,
TK, SJ

Textklick
Local time: 06:32
Native speaker of: English
PRO pts in pair: 1097
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