kaudern

English translation: turbo whistle

GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
German term or phrase:kaudern
English translation:turbo whistle
Entered by: Roger Matthews

08:22 Sep 21, 2020
German to English translations [PRO]
Tech/Engineering - Automotive / Cars & Trucks / car engines
German term or phrase: kaudern
Anti-Kauder-Funktion - just in a list related to VW cars.

It refers to a noise coming from a car engine.

For example below, from: https://community.dieselschrauber.org/viewtopic.php?p=208003...

Aber unser BLS kaudert nicht, er dröhnt nur etwas, wenn man ihn so richtig schaffen lässt, ihn also knapp über ZMS-Rubbel-Drehzahl drehen lässt und dann volles Drehmoment fordert.

There are a few other references from similar forums. I've tried "rattle" or "hum", but I don't think either of them really capture it. And it sounds as if it is an accepted term to refer to precisely this noise. Any mechanics out there? Or with better research skills?!
Thanks
Roger Matthews
United Kingdom
Local time: 23:00
turbo whistle
Explanation:
See links and google. Alternatives are "turbocharger whistling" and the like. "Whining" is also used, but my feeling was that "whistling" is the more common term. It is basically excess air pressure from the turbocharger that flows back and forth in these turbo hoses.

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Note added at 1 day 9 hrs (2020-09-22 18:20:38 GMT)
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background video (in German): https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GwmhuGl1ATA
Selected response from:

Daniel Arnold
Germany
Local time: 00:00
Grading comment
Thank you for your help. Much appreciated.
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer



Summary of answers provided
4turbo whistle
Daniel Arnold
4to swish
Tim Bayton
2to talk gibberish
Alexander Schleber


  

Answers


22 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 2/5Answerer confidence 2/5
to talk gibberish


Explanation:
Found at: https://en.bab.la/dictionary/german-english/kaudern

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Note added at 59 mins (2020-09-21 09:22:14 GMT)
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You are right! Perhaps its a spelling mistake and "zaudern" (hesitate / falter / waver) is meant, which does seem to fit better.

Alexander Schleber
Belgium
Local time: 00:00
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Native in GermanGerman, Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 72
Notes to answerer
Asker: Thanks Alexander. Yes, like Kauderwelsch, that's the only time I've heard "kauder" - but in this context I'm not sure.

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2 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
to swish


Explanation:
"Talking gibberish" obviously doesn't work for an engine noise; "chattering" might be possible but I don't think that's the noise that is meant here. These two links seem to refer to the same noise. It's obviously to do with an odd air flow and it seems like it's a sort of grinding/swishing/scraping noise. There's almost certainly no set term for it, as all the references seem to be onomatopoeic.


    https://www.motor-talk.de/forum/kaudern-mal-anders-soundfile-t1779341.html
    https://volkswagenforum.com/forum/volkswagen-cabrio-34/grinding-noise-when-accelerating-99-cabrio-gl-36954/
Tim Bayton
Local time: 23:00
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
Notes to answerer
Asker: Thanks Tim - great references. Also good to hear that there doesn't seem to be a fixed term (but also disappointing!). Swish is my favourite so far - even though I would expect something like "zischen" or "sausen"...and "kaudern" is clearly a term often used on car forums/by mechanics.


Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Vere Barzilai: The front brake affects directly the tire of the front wheel with a rubber-pad, whereby a characteristic grinding noise comes up.
18 hrs

disagree  Daniel Arnold: not used in this context.
1 day 7 hrs
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1 day 9 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
turbo whistle


Explanation:
See links and google. Alternatives are "turbocharger whistling" and the like. "Whining" is also used, but my feeling was that "whistling" is the more common term. It is basically excess air pressure from the turbocharger that flows back and forth in these turbo hoses.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 1 day 9 hrs (2020-09-22 18:20:38 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

background video (in German): https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GwmhuGl1ATA


    https://www.researchgate.net/publication/238194703_Controlling_the_turbocharger_whistling_noise_in_diesel_engines
    https://www.mpulse.mahle.com/en/do-and-get/whistling_turbo.jsp
Daniel Arnold
Germany
Local time: 00:00
Native speaker of: Native in GermanGerman, Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 28
Grading comment
Thank you for your help. Much appreciated.
Notes to answerer
Asker: Bingo! Thanks so much for your answer and your links. Exactly what I was looking for.

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