as at OR as per

English translation: as at = BE; as of = AE

GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
German term or phrase:as at OR as per
English translation:as at = BE; as of = AE
Entered by: silvia glatzhofer

07:35 Jan 14, 2004
German to English translations [PRO]
Bus/Financial
German term or phrase: as at OR as per
Bilanz zum 31. Dez. 2002

gefunden hab ich sowohl as per als auch as at. meine amerikanischen freunde sagen as at, die engl. sagen as of/as per - was ist das allgemeinere?
silvia glatzhofer
Local time: 09:28
as at = BE; as of = AE
Explanation:
As a general rule, "as at" is more British English, and "as of" more American and International English, though you'll find a fair degree of crossover. I'd avoid "as per" completely in this context. The most elegant solution is to say "balance sheet for the period ended ..."
Selected response from:

RobinB
United States
Local time: 02:28
Grading comment
thanks all of you
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer



Summary of answers provided
5 +1as at = BE; as of = AE
RobinB
4 +1as of
Monika Leit
5as at
Gabrijela
4basically synonymous
Robert Schlarb
4careful with this one
Gareth McMillan


  

Answers


4 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +1
as of


Explanation:
Ich übersetze immer "as of"

Monika Leit
Local time: 09:28
Native speaker of: Native in GermanGerman
PRO pts in pair: 559

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  KirstenR: ich auch...
15 mins
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25 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5
as at


Explanation:
... your statement of account as at 31 May ... (Commercial correspondence by A. Ashley, Oxford)

Gabrijela
Local time: 10:28
Native speaker of: Native in SerbianSerbian, Native in CroatianCroatian
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48 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
careful with this one


Explanation:
There is no general term and they are most definitely not interchangeable:

"as at" refers to specific time e.g.- The Bilanz "as at" 14th January was €100,- - "as per" is also ok here but not as concise.

"as per" tends to mean "according to" e.g.- The Bilanz "as per" the published accounts.

"as of" tends to describe on-going time "after" a specific point in time e.g.- as of 14th January the "Bilanz" can no longer be amended (corrected) (because on that date it was finalised).

I would like to suggest you post this question on the "English" board- you may get more response from native speakers there. The nuances here are very subtle indeed and often carelessly misused in everyday English.

Gareth McMillan
Local time: 09:28
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 793
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54 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): +1
as at = BE; as of = AE


Explanation:
As a general rule, "as at" is more British English, and "as of" more American and International English, though you'll find a fair degree of crossover. I'd avoid "as per" completely in this context. The most elegant solution is to say "balance sheet for the period ended ..."

RobinB
United States
Local time: 02:28
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 1937
Grading comment
thanks all of you

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Steffen Walter: indeed - or "...for the year ended"
3 mins
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1 hr   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
basically synonymous


Explanation:
Even though there are nuances in meaning for other contexts, when used to translate the phrase given above (i.e. (Konto-)Stand zum tt.mm.jjjj), "as at" and "as per" may be used interchangeably.
I have observed that American lawyers in particular tend to use "as per" in this context, since it emphasizes the legal and binding character of the disclosed information.

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Note added at 2004-01-14 08:38:42 (GMT)
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Ref.: Dietl/Lorenz 6th Edition

Robert Schlarb
Local time: 09:28
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish, Native in GermanGerman
PRO pts in pair: 1034
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