jemand jemandem vor die Nase setzen

English translation: promote the stupid cow and stick her right under my nose

GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
German term or phrase: meinen Urlaub ausnutzen, um mir diese blöde Kuh vor die Nase zu setzen im Büro
English translation:promote the stupid cow and stick her right under my nose
Entered by: Susan Welsh

12:53 Dec 8, 2008
German to English translations [PRO]
Bus/Financial - Business/Commerce (general)
German term or phrase: jemand jemandem vor die Nase setzen
"...X wollte meinen Urlaub ausnutzen, um mir diese blöde Kuh vor die Nase zu setzen im Büro."
Lonnie Legg
Germany
Local time: 15:27
see below for full phrase
Explanation:
What about: "promote this stupid cow and stick her right under my nose"?
I can't think of an English idiom, but it's a shame to strip the humor out of the German idiom. Sometimes literal translations are more fun.
NOSE is probably among the most frequently used words in idioms in many languages (cf. Gogol's short story by that name in Russian). I wouldn't like to get rid of it here.
Selected response from:

Susan Welsh
United States
Local time: 09:27
Grading comment
Selected automatically based on peer agreement.
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer



Summary of answers provided
4 +4to promote SO ahead of SO (else)
David Moore (X)
4 +3by letting her steal my job
mary austria
3 +4see below for full phrase
Susan Welsh
3 +2to appoint someone over someone's head
Alison MacG
4to put someone over me
Ellen Kraus
3to make this person my boss
BrigitteHilgner
3dump someone on someone else
suew


  

Answers


6 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
to put someone over me


Explanation:
he wanted to avail himself of my absence by putting this .... over me

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Note added at 7 Min. (2008-12-08 13:01:40 GMT)
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they put a new man over him : ihm wurde ein Neuer vor die Nase gesetzt

Ellen Kraus
Austria
Local time: 15:27
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Native in GermanGerman
PRO pts in category: 88
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25 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5
dump someone on someone else


Explanation:
I believe it suggests that (at least at first) the person whose "Nase" it is, is powerless to stop it happening

suew
United Kingdom
Local time: 14:27
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 4
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55 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +3
by letting her steal my job


Explanation:
Alternative: by having her steal my job (or duties).

mary austria
Local time: 15:27
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 11

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Edith Kelly: I have a feeling that this is actually meant here
11 mins
  -> Thanks, EdithK. That's my feeling, too. But I don't think there's an idiom for it in English. Grüße!

agree  Ingeborg Gowans (X): intended meaning; how to render "blöde Kuh" is another issue :))
20 mins
  -> Thanks, Ingeborg. "Tussi" is another hard one!

neutral  hazmatgerman (X): Im Deutschen ist doch von der Arbeitsplatzwegnahme nicht die Rede, oder?
41 mins
  -> Urlaub + Büro = Arbeitsplatz IMO!

agree  Charles Rothwell: I agree with the sense. ("X intended to use my being away on leave to promote this stupid cow to what should have been MY job!")http://books.google.co.uk/books?id=6kOs2ewssTwC&pg=RA2-PA691... die Nase setzen English&source=web&ots=zbRBA
1 hr
  -> Thanks, Charles!
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1 hr   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5
to make this person my boss


Explanation:
How about some context?

BrigitteHilgner
Austria
Local time: 15:27
Native speaker of: Native in GermanGerman
PRO pts in category: 172
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1 hr   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5 peer agreement (net): +2
to appoint someone over someone's head


Explanation:
Another way of putting it (see the following dictionary of idioms)

http://books.google.co.uk/books?id=Ve-Q4qZ1ycoC&pg=PA216&lpg...

It could mean that this person got the job in preference to the more obvious, but absent, candidate or perhaps, if the person on holiday held a position of some authority, without consulting that person.

over someone's head
a) without a person in the obvious position being considered, esp for promotion: the graduate was promoted over the heads of several of his seniors
b) without consulting a person in the obvious position but referring to a higher authority: in making his complaint he went straight to the director, over the head of his immediate boss
c) beyond a person's comprehension
(Collins)

Alison MacG
United Kingdom
Local time: 14:27
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 38

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  hazmatgerman (X): In Anbetracht der Unklarheit, ob eigene Beförderung oder Mitsprache bei der Beförderung gemeint ist, eine hinreichend unklare Lösung. Die Umgangssprache fehlt dann noch.
22 mins

agree  Harald Moelzer (medical-translator)
2 days 22 hrs
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1 hr   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +4
to promote SO ahead of SO (else)


Explanation:
Is how I'd suggest it is translated. The wording might read "to promote this stupid cow ahead of me".

David Moore (X)
Local time: 15:27
Native speaker of: English
PRO pts in category: 219

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Susan Welsh: with "promote this stupid cow..." Good to keep the humor of the idiom in there.
11 mins

agree  Rebecca Garber
1 hr

agree  Inge Meinzer
1 day 12 hrs

agree  Harald Moelzer (medical-translator)
3 days 2 hrs
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1 hr   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5 peer agreement (net): +4
see below for full phrase


Explanation:
What about: "promote this stupid cow and stick her right under my nose"?
I can't think of an English idiom, but it's a shame to strip the humor out of the German idiom. Sometimes literal translations are more fun.
NOSE is probably among the most frequently used words in idioms in many languages (cf. Gogol's short story by that name in Russian). I wouldn't like to get rid of it here.

Susan Welsh
United States
Local time: 09:27
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 24
Grading comment
Selected automatically based on peer agreement.

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Nicole Schnell: Nice!
1 hr

agree  Johanna Timm, PhD: yes- really nice!
3 hrs

agree  Inge Meinzer
1 day 12 hrs

agree  Harald Moelzer (medical-translator)
3 days 2 hrs
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