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Lehrerin zur Anstellung

03:45 Apr 11, 2005
German to English translations [PRO]
Certificates, Diplomas, Licenses, CVs / teaching certificate
German term or phrase: Lehrerin zur Anstellung
Appears on a certificate issued to a teacher trainee graduate:
"....im Namen des Landes Niedersachsen ernnene ich Frau XXX mit Wirkung vom [Datum] unter Berufung in das Beamtenverhaeltnis auf Probe zur Lehrerin z.A."

I think it means "teacher on probation", i.e.: "in respect of her appointment as a civil servant on probation, to be a teacher on probation" but perhaps it's not so much on probation as "entitled to/eligible for a salaried position as a state teacher"???
Tried all glossaries, online sources and can find no definitive translation for Lehrer/in zur Anstellung, so appreciate any help with a DEFINITIVE translation (no guesses please)
KiwiSue
Local time: 01:34


Summary of answers provided
3 +3untenured teacher
Nick Somers (X)
4In the US you'd probably say
gangels
4probationary teacher
Victor Dewsbery


Discussion entries: 2





  

Answers


1 hr   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5 peer agreement (net): +3
untenured teacher


Explanation:
http://www.ratgeberrecht.de/worte/rw04621.html
To judge by the explanation given at this URL, Lehrerin z.A. is the official title she's allowed to use during the probationary period.
Follow the links on each of the words in the definition for further information.
Untenured teacher might be a possible translation.
http://www.cga.ct.gov/2002/olrdata/ed/rpt/2002-r-0469.htm
Sorry, this is a guess, or at least a suggestion, rather than the DEFINITIVE translation.

Nick Somers (X)
Local time: 15:34
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 4
Grading comment
Thanks for the suggestions and links, but to be honest this didn't take me any further than I had already got in my own research

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Mustafa Er (BSc MA): -
12 mins

agree  Deborah Shannon: I doubt there is a definitive translation for it as it's a Dienstbezeichnung specific to the German career structure
39 mins

agree  Sonia Soros
2 hrs
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The asker has declined this answer
Comment: Thanks for the suggestions and links, but to be honest this didn't take me any further than I had already got in my own research

7 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
probationary teacher


Explanation:
That's what I was called when I did my probationary year as a teacher in the UK (although that's ages ago now, and I've been out of teaching far too long to be up to date on later developments). Nick's suggestion of "untenured" looks as if it's based on a US website.
So it depends to some extent on who (and what country) you are translating for.
Of course, the German concept of the "Beamtenverhältnis auf Probe" is unique to Germany, so your translation will only get the general gist - you'd probably have to write a whole treatise to get the full import of the German civil service system across.
International equivalents in the educational world are hardly ever "definitive" in the sense of conveying the meaning of the phrase used and the administrative dog's tail that trails behind it. Career entry patterns for teachers vary from country to country. As far as the general sense is concerned, your instinctive response (on probation) was right. But if you're translating for administrative hair-splitters (especially if you don't know what jurisdiction and country they are based in), you may need a lengthy footnote on the German career entry pattern (for example, I believe probationary teachers in Germany spend two or three years on probation - don't quote me on that, I'd need to check), but I got away with one year in the UK. And the Germans have to attend seminars, and I think they have to submit written material, too, but all I got was a couple of visits from an inspector and an official report on my work by a colleague from the school I was teaching at.

Victor Dewsbery
Germany
Local time: 15:34
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 12
Grading comment
Thanks for the lengthy comments but the problem was I had to come up some kind of brief translation of a certificate and the UK probationary system is indeed different from the German - see below

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
neutral  Nick Somers (X): You highlight well the problem of comparing carrots with peas; my suggestion was intended to reflect that, unlike UK, German teachers are civil servants and do obtain "tenure". Unlike chimney sweeps. ;-)
4 hrs
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The asker has declined this answer
Comment: Thanks for the lengthy comments but the problem was I had to come up some kind of brief translation of a certificate and the UK probationary system is indeed different from the German - see below

11 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
In the US you'd probably say


Explanation:
By authority vested in me through the state of Lower Saxony and in compliance with the Civil Service statutes, I herewith appoint Ms. xxxx to the position of teacher on a trial basis with the objective of full tenure.


You are put on probation only after you screw up on the job (viz., you are given another chance). In the US, you are hired on a 'trial basis' (usually 3 months) until you are given full employment status.

gangels
Local time: 07:34
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish, Native in GermanGerman
PRO pts in category: 21
Grading comment
Thanks for the suggestion - I appreciate your (and everyone else's) efforts but in the end I found a German teacher who was able to confirm that the probationary part refers only to the Beamtin bit and the zur Anstellung means she has employment as a teacher for an indefinite period, but is not yet a life-long civil servant. I decided to write the following: ....hereby declare...to be a duly appointed state teacher, in her capacity as a civil servant on probation [i.e. not yet a life-long civil servant]
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The asker has declined this answer
Comment: Thanks for the suggestion - I appreciate your (and everyone else's) efforts but in the end I found a German teacher who was able to confirm that the probationary part refers only to the Beamtin bit and the zur Anstellung means she has employment as a teacher for an indefinite period, but is not yet a life-long civil servant. I decided to write the following: ....hereby declare...to be a duly appointed state teacher, in her capacity as a civil servant on probation [i.e. not yet a life-long civil servant]



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