Schnittvariante

English translation: weights

07:21 Apr 6, 2005
German to English translations [PRO]
Computers (general) / Schriftarten
German term or phrase: Schnittvariante
Bereich: Homepagedesign

Für eine cd-gerechte präsentation benötigen wir:
°logo, logovarianten und richtlinien für die logoplatzierung
° definition grundschrift(en) und zusatzschrift(en) inkl. ***schnittvarianten***
°definition hauptfarbe(n) und zusatzfarbe(n) (farbcodes und erlaubte werte)
gfish
Local time: 04:28
English translation:weights
Explanation:
I think they mean the different weights of fonts i.e. Light, Bold etc. or styles Italic / Cursive / SmallCaps etc.
Selected response from:

Michael Bailey
Austria
Local time: 13:28
Grading comment
danke schön!
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer



Summary of answers provided
4 +1typefaces
Ken Cox
2 +3weights
Michael Bailey


  

Answers


6 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 2/5Answerer confidence 2/5 peer agreement (net): +3
weights


Explanation:
I think they mean the different weights of fonts i.e. Light, Bold etc. or styles Italic / Cursive / SmallCaps etc.

Michael Bailey
Austria
Local time: 13:28
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 8
Grading comment
danke schön!

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Mustafa Er (BSc MA): -
5 mins
  -> thanks

agree  Klaus Herrmann: Strictly speaking, italic isn't a weight, but it's common lingo to refer to different typestyles of a font family as weights. (And yes, some font families include an extra font containing small caps. )
7 mins
  -> Thanks - you are of course correct that technically Italic is of course a style rather than a weight - I had always thought it confusing that bold, italic etc. were lumped together as "Schriftschnitte" in M$ Word. Thanks!

agree  sonja29 (X)
4 hrs
  -> thanks
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

23 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +1
typefaces


Explanation:
'Typeface' is the typographer's printer's term for a member of a typeface family (which is commonly called a font). This is reflected in terms such as 'boldface'.

sample ref:

Font or Typeface?

Confused by the terms? That’s probably because it’s confusing!

But here’s the simple way to think of it.

Typeface: is the design of the alphabet--the shape of the letters that make up the typestyle. The letters, numbers, and symbols that make up a design of type. So when you say “Arial” or “Goudy” you’re talking about a set of letters in a specific style.

Font: is the digital file that contains/describes the typeface. Think of the font as a little piece of software that tells the computer and printer how to display and print the typeface.

According to Adobe’s type gloassary: “A font is one weight, width, and style of a typeface. Before scalable type, there was little distinction between the terms font, face, and family. Font and face still tend to be used interchangeably, although the term face is usually more correct.”

If you want to get a little deeper:

A typeface family is a group of typefaces that were designed to be used together. For example, Goudy Old Style has Roman (upright or normal), italic (slanted and cursive), bold and bold italic versions. Each of the style and weight combinations is called a face or typeface, and together they are, hopefully, a happy typeface family (rather than a disfunctional typeface family which will probably be more familiar to you).
http://www.will-harris.com/font_vs_typeface.html

Ken Cox
Local time: 13:28
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 64

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  MMUlr
18 mins

neutral  Klaus Herrmann: Perfectly correct, but not best option here IMNHO. With due respect to Daniel's explanation, I think that typeface may lead to confusion (as in "Helvetica is one typeface, Gouda Oldstyle another"). Just compare "commonly called a font" and the definiton.
44 mins
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)



Login or register (free and only takes a few minutes) to participate in this question.

You will also have access to many other tools and opportunities designed for those who have language-related jobs (or are passionate about them). Participation is free and the site has a strict confidentiality policy.

KudoZ™ translation help

The KudoZ network provides a framework for translators and others to assist each other with translations or explanations of terms and short phrases.


See also:

Your current localization setting

English

Select a language

Term search
  • All of ProZ.com
  • Term search
  • Jobs
  • Forums
  • Multiple search