Reibzeit

English translation: scouring time (prior to setting)

GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
German term or phrase:Reibzeit
English translation:scouring time (prior to setting)
Entered by: Johannes Gleim

13:52 Dec 20, 2016
German to English translations [PRO]
Tech/Engineering - Construction / Civil Engineering / Building supplies (plaster, mortar, etc.)
German term or phrase: Reibzeit
A general description of plasters from a building supplies company includes the following sentence:

"Darüber hinaus sind sie feuchtigkeitsbeständig und der XX [plaster type] verfügt zusätzlich über eine besonders kurze Reibzeit."

In fact, "Reibzeit" recurs frequently in the same text. All I've got at the moment is "rubbing time" but that sounds too literal to me (and has not been corroborated by any of my research). Moreover, "friction time" does not seem to fit in this context.

Any help would be greatly appreciated. :-)
jt1979
Local time: 21:05
scouring time
Explanation:
Reibebrett n float, plaster’s float, maons’s float, hawk
Reiben n in den frischen Anstrich scouring in the we paint
(Gelbrich, Fachwörterbuch Architektur und Bauwesen)

scouring Compacting the surface of plasterwork with a float, which is pressed flat and worked in a circular manner. Sometimes water is sprinkled on with a brush at the same time. The finishing process with a steel trowel is call ‘ironing in’. Not all plasters are suitable.
(Dictionary of Building)

Two-coat work is often used for factories or warehouses and the less important rooms of residences. The first coat is of coarse stuff finished fair with the darby float and scoured. A thin coat of setting stuff is then laid on, and trowelled and brushed smooth. Two-coat work is described as render and set on walls, and lath, plaster and set, or lath, lay and set on laths.
:
The second or "floating coat", and is 1/4 to 3/8 inches thick. Four operations are involved in laying the second coat, namely, forming the screeds; filling in the spaces between the screeds; scouring the surface; keying the face for finishing.
• Wall screeds are plumbed and ceiling screeds leveled. Screeds are narrow strips of plastering, carefully plumbed and leveled, so as to form a guide upon which the floating rule is run, thus securing a perfectly horizontal or vertical surface, or, in the case of circular work, a uniform curve.
• The filling in, or flanking, consists of laying the spaces between the screeds with coarse stuff, which is brought flush with the level of the screeds with the floating rule.
• The scouring of the floating coat is of great importance, for it consolidates the material, and, besides hardening it, prevents it from cracking. It is done by the plasterer with a hand float that he applies vigorously with a rapid circular motion, at the same time sprinkling the work with water from a stock brush in the other hand. Any small holes or inequalities are filled up as he proceeds. The whole surface should be uniformly scoured two or three times, with an interval between each operation of from six to twenty-four hours. This process leaves the plaster with a close-grained and fairly smooth surface, offering little or no key to the coat that is to follow.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Plasterwork

The correct degree of filling can be determined by simple experiments and is usually in the range 15- 45% by volume. The scouring time is several hours, for example 5-40 hours, and depends somewhat on the adjustable agitation intensity.
https://www.google.com/patents/US5070658

I'm just a dyer but been reading in an book about scouring finish with a wooden float.
:
You still use the cross grain method sometimes spread on, it doesn't have to be a wooden float though a poly float does the job well , if your timing is right and the finish is applied to the correct thickness you really shouldn't have to use a float at all ,but from time to time you might get a thick frame to work around or you can / should use a float around wall lights , the correct time to use a float is as the second coat needs a little water to make the trowel glide, you will still water to stop the float from grabbing , use the float in small circular motions and it will leave a "fat " on the surface leave that for 5 Min's on so depending then trowel in , you will see any low or high spots in the plaster immediately you start to use the float, also it will really help if your float is well worn in and very clean and smooth .
:
That book you referred to is also the same book if I remember rightly which tells you to rule out your finish plaster between coats (madness if you can render properly), so trust me don't bother using a wooden float for your second coat. What they were referring to about using a float on the second coat is not scouring, but using a float to apply the plaster instead of a trowel if my memory serves me correctly.
http://www.plasterersforum.com/threads/scouring-plaster.3037...

Method of application
Scouring plaster is applied in two thin layers with a rvs trowel. The first layer as covering, level and fixed. This to eliminate adsorption from the surface and to bring this to colour.
Apply second layer after drying (approx. 1.5 mm). Have the material dry until the layer is solid enough for finishing.
After drying, sufficiently humidify the scouring plaster with water and scour with a scourer.
The structure thickness is dependent on the drying time.
The drying time can vary due to ambient temperature and atmospheric humidity. A temperature of + 15° C is required for a smooth finishing
http://en.digo.nl/scouring-plaster/

Therefore an extension of the concrete floor of sufficient thickness is advised. Fig. 9 shows the ... "cr). (1) t , = K. 1 (where in ti = scouring time in hours; K = 3-15.
https://books.google.de/books?id=MX3pCAAAQBAJ&pg=SA3-PA15&lp...
Selected response from:

Johannes Gleim
Local time: 22:05
Grading comment
I'm still not 100% sure what the translation should be. Going by the other responses (discussion and reference), I suspect it may be closer to "setting time" than "scouring time". However, your suggestion, explanation and references have proved very helpful. Many thanks for your assistance.
2 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer



Summary of answers provided
4scouring time
Johannes Gleim
Summary of reference entries provided
Reibzeit
Kim Metzger

Discussion entries: 4





  

Answers


4 days   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
scouring time


Explanation:
Reibebrett n float, plaster’s float, maons’s float, hawk
Reiben n in den frischen Anstrich scouring in the we paint
(Gelbrich, Fachwörterbuch Architektur und Bauwesen)

scouring Compacting the surface of plasterwork with a float, which is pressed flat and worked in a circular manner. Sometimes water is sprinkled on with a brush at the same time. The finishing process with a steel trowel is call ‘ironing in’. Not all plasters are suitable.
(Dictionary of Building)

Two-coat work is often used for factories or warehouses and the less important rooms of residences. The first coat is of coarse stuff finished fair with the darby float and scoured. A thin coat of setting stuff is then laid on, and trowelled and brushed smooth. Two-coat work is described as render and set on walls, and lath, plaster and set, or lath, lay and set on laths.
:
The second or "floating coat", and is 1/4 to 3/8 inches thick. Four operations are involved in laying the second coat, namely, forming the screeds; filling in the spaces between the screeds; scouring the surface; keying the face for finishing.
• Wall screeds are plumbed and ceiling screeds leveled. Screeds are narrow strips of plastering, carefully plumbed and leveled, so as to form a guide upon which the floating rule is run, thus securing a perfectly horizontal or vertical surface, or, in the case of circular work, a uniform curve.
• The filling in, or flanking, consists of laying the spaces between the screeds with coarse stuff, which is brought flush with the level of the screeds with the floating rule.
• The scouring of the floating coat is of great importance, for it consolidates the material, and, besides hardening it, prevents it from cracking. It is done by the plasterer with a hand float that he applies vigorously with a rapid circular motion, at the same time sprinkling the work with water from a stock brush in the other hand. Any small holes or inequalities are filled up as he proceeds. The whole surface should be uniformly scoured two or three times, with an interval between each operation of from six to twenty-four hours. This process leaves the plaster with a close-grained and fairly smooth surface, offering little or no key to the coat that is to follow.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Plasterwork

The correct degree of filling can be determined by simple experiments and is usually in the range 15- 45% by volume. The scouring time is several hours, for example 5-40 hours, and depends somewhat on the adjustable agitation intensity.
https://www.google.com/patents/US5070658

I'm just a dyer but been reading in an book about scouring finish with a wooden float.
:
You still use the cross grain method sometimes spread on, it doesn't have to be a wooden float though a poly float does the job well , if your timing is right and the finish is applied to the correct thickness you really shouldn't have to use a float at all ,but from time to time you might get a thick frame to work around or you can / should use a float around wall lights , the correct time to use a float is as the second coat needs a little water to make the trowel glide, you will still water to stop the float from grabbing , use the float in small circular motions and it will leave a "fat " on the surface leave that for 5 Min's on so depending then trowel in , you will see any low or high spots in the plaster immediately you start to use the float, also it will really help if your float is well worn in and very clean and smooth .
:
That book you referred to is also the same book if I remember rightly which tells you to rule out your finish plaster between coats (madness if you can render properly), so trust me don't bother using a wooden float for your second coat. What they were referring to about using a float on the second coat is not scouring, but using a float to apply the plaster instead of a trowel if my memory serves me correctly.
http://www.plasterersforum.com/threads/scouring-plaster.3037...

Method of application
Scouring plaster is applied in two thin layers with a rvs trowel. The first layer as covering, level and fixed. This to eliminate adsorption from the surface and to bring this to colour.
Apply second layer after drying (approx. 1.5 mm). Have the material dry until the layer is solid enough for finishing.
After drying, sufficiently humidify the scouring plaster with water and scour with a scourer.
The structure thickness is dependent on the drying time.
The drying time can vary due to ambient temperature and atmospheric humidity. A temperature of + 15° C is required for a smooth finishing
http://en.digo.nl/scouring-plaster/

Therefore an extension of the concrete floor of sufficient thickness is advised. Fig. 9 shows the ... "cr). (1) t , = K. 1 (where in ti = scouring time in hours; K = 3-15.
https://books.google.de/books?id=MX3pCAAAQBAJ&pg=SA3-PA15&lp...


Johannes Gleim
Local time: 22:05
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in GermanGerman
PRO pts in category: 290
Grading comment
I'm still not 100% sure what the translation should be. Going by the other responses (discussion and reference), I suspect it may be closer to "setting time" than "scouring time". However, your suggestion, explanation and references have proved very helpful. Many thanks for your assistance.
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Reference comments


5 days
Reference: Reibzeit

Reference information:
This term seems to be used almost exclusively by the Baumit company and only in connection with machine-applied interior plaster. Beschleunigte Reibzeit (Reibzeit zwischen 90 - 150 Minuten, je nach Witterung und Untergrund). http://www.baumit.at/pimdam/AT/pdb/PDBL_KlimaPutz_S.pdf
"Scouring time" - what's that? The time it takes to scour a 1 square meter of freshly plastered wall?
We're talking about accelerating the time it takes the plaster to reach a certain stage. I agree with the comments in the discussion box that it's probably the setting time when floating can start.


--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 5 days (2016-12-25 16:11:41 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Reibebrett = float

Kim Metzger
Mexico
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 1587
Note to reference poster
Asker: Many thanks, Kim - that all makes sense.

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