aus dem Tritt geraten

English translation: to have jumped the rails

GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
German term or phrase:aus dem Tritt geraten
English translation:to have jumped the rails
Entered by: Susan Welsh

11:51 Sep 26, 2008
German to English translations [PRO]
Bus/Financial - Economics / macroeconomic theory
German term or phrase: aus dem Tritt geraten
Nach dem Platzen der Internet-Blasa ... schien die prosperiende Entwicklung der Weltwirtschft aud dem Tritt geraten.
I translated this as "... it seemed as though the prosperous development of the economy was running out of steam."
Is there a better choice?
Susan Welsh
United States
Local time: 08:29
to have gone off the rails
Explanation:
off the top of my head

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Note added at 1 hr (2008-09-26 13:05:33 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

"go off the rails" usually means "to lose it", "go crazy", etc. but it does have a connotation that might fit here ...

(go) off the rails. (to go) off the proper course; (to become) insane. ride on a rail. ☆. to place on a rail and carry out of the community: extralegal ...
www.yourdictionary.com/rail - 23k - Cached - Similar pages

Selected response from:

David Hollywood
Local time: 09:29
Grading comment
Thanks to all! --Susan
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer



Summary of answers provided
3 +2to have gone off the rails
David Hollywood
3fallen out of step or lost its rhythm
Donal Murphy-Bokern
3be out of step
valhalla55


  

Answers


2 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5
be out of step


Explanation:
my 2 cents

valhalla55
Native speaker of: Native in RomanianRomanian
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7 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5
fallen out of step or lost its rhythm


Explanation:
Seems an understatment of what's going on in the USA, but it is a translation of the phrase.


    Reference: http://joanvinallcox.wordpress.com/2006/01/31/higher-educati...
Donal Murphy-Bokern
Germany
Local time: 14:29
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: English
PRO pts in category: 4
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4 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5 peer agreement (net): +2
to have gone off the rails


Explanation:
off the top of my head

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 1 hr (2008-09-26 13:05:33 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

"go off the rails" usually means "to lose it", "go crazy", etc. but it does have a connotation that might fit here ...

(go) off the rails. (to go) off the proper course; (to become) insane. ride on a rail. ☆. to place on a rail and carry out of the community: extralegal ...
www.yourdictionary.com/rail - 23k - Cached - Similar pages



David Hollywood
Local time: 09:29
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 40
Grading comment
Thanks to all! --Susan

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Donal Murphy-Bokern
3 mins
  -> thanks Donal :)

neutral  Camilla Seifert: Not really, David. Off the rails is more in terms of "losing it" - going "nuts". I would use "off track".
3 mins
  -> I agree that it's not literal Camilla but here I think it might hold water :)

agree  Paul Cohen: In view of Camilla's comment, perhaps "jumped the rails"?
7 mins
  -> nice twist Paul and works in my book :)

neutral  babli: agree with Camilla
26 mins
  -> wee bit of poetic licence maybe but I still think it's ok and take your point babli :)
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