Univ.-Prof Dr. rer. nat.

English translation: Professor

GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
German term or phrase:Univ.-Prof Dr. rer. nat.
English translation:Professor
Entered by: Natalie Wilcock (X)

15:19 Oct 8, 2004
German to English translations [PRO]
Bus/Financial - Education / Pedagogy
German term or phrase: Univ.-Prof Dr. rer. nat.
Die Urkunde wurde Univ.-Prof Dr. rer. nat. Schnabeltasse feierlich übergeben.
Natalie Wilcock (X)
Local time: 12:21
If you're asking how he would be described in English
Explanation:
rather than what "Dr. rer. nat" means, then he would simply be called "Professor" - "the certificate was presented to Prof. Schnabeltasse" - the title "Professor" comes higher in the "hierarchy" than "Dr.", and you don't say "Prof. Dr" in English.
HTH
Selected response from:

John Bowden
Local time: 11:21
Grading comment
Thank you very much, John. That's what this text really calls for, a short title. Best regards, Natalie
3 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer



Summary of answers provided
5 +11If you're asking how he would be described in English
John Bowden
4 +5D. Sc.
Niamh Mahony
5 +1Professor
transatgees
4 -1PhD
iolmemb
3Doctor of Science
Kim Metzger


  

Answers


5 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +5
D. Sc.


Explanation:
Dr. rer.nat. : Doktor der Naturwissenschaften :: DSc, ScD of D.Sc.: Doctor of Science

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Note added at 5 mins (2004-10-08 15:25:24 GMT)
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Dr. rer. nat. = Doctor rerum naturalium = Doktor der Naturwissenschaften =

Niamh Mahony
Local time: 12:21
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Kim Metzger
2 mins

agree  EdithK
9 mins

agree  David Hollywood: with Kim on explanation :)
9 mins

agree  sonja29 (X)
7 hrs

agree  Erik Macki: I agree with the caveat that "D. Sc." would not be readily understood by residents of the United States as it is more a British and Canadian abbreviation.
9 hrs

agree  moser.ilja
1 day 2 hrs

disagree  Ian M-H (X): In many English-speaking countries, "D.Sc." is reserved as a (rarely awarded) higher doctorate - certainly not equivalent to Dr. rer. nat.
589 days
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6 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5
Doctor of Science


Explanation:
Antje Ruppert-Bousquet answered this question some time ago, but it was difficult to find in the glossaries. In English-speaking countries the Univ-Prof. is usually not included in the title.

Dr. rer. nat. stands for "doctor rerum naturalium".

http://www.proz.com/kudoz/46358


Kim Metzger
Mexico
Local time: 05:21
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 879

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
disagree  iolmemb: Dr. rer. nat = PhD
9 mins

agree  Erik Macki: I'm not sure why someone would argue that Doctor of Science is wrong, but Doctor of Science is indeed an equivalent (a Doctor of Science would indeed hold the equivalent of a Ph.D., but that doesn't negate the concept of Doctor of Science, which correct).
9 hrs
  -> I was a little puzzled, too, Erik.

agree  sonja29 (X)
9 hrs

disagree  Ian M-H (X): "doctorate in science", but not "Doctor of Science" - translators shouldn't be in the business of converting degrees (and a DSc is typically a higher doctorate, not the same as a German Dr. rer. nat.)
589 days
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15 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): +11
If you're asking how he would be described in English


Explanation:
rather than what "Dr. rer. nat" means, then he would simply be called "Professor" - "the certificate was presented to Prof. Schnabeltasse" - the title "Professor" comes higher in the "hierarchy" than "Dr.", and you don't say "Prof. Dr" in English.
HTH

John Bowden
Local time: 11:21
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 19
Grading comment
Thank you very much, John. That's what this text really calls for, a short title. Best regards, Natalie

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Andras Malatinszky
39 mins
  -> Thanks Andras!

agree  Tom Funke: Precisely
1 hr

agree  David Moore: Spot on
1 hr

agree  Michele Johnson: Right; anything more than Professor is overkill in this context.
1 hr

agree  Christine Lam
1 hr

agree  Leo3 (X)
2 hrs

agree  Andrew D
3 hrs

agree  sonja29 (X)
7 hrs

agree  Erik Macki: Only if absolutely needed you can postpose the German degree: "Professor Schnabeltasse, Dr. rer. nat." Otherwise just "Professor" is absolutely right.
9 hrs

agree  John Speese: I would agree with professor, at a university level in the USA, this implies that you have your PhD, people without PhDs who teach at the university level are usually called instructors, not professors.
9 hrs

agree  Ian M-H (X)
589 days
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22 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): -1
PhD


Explanation:
Have always known this to be the equivalent in UK Univeristy invites etc!

iolmemb
Local time: 12:21
Native speaker of: Native in GermanGerman, Native in EnglishEnglish

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
disagree  Ian M-H (X): a PhD may be equivalent to a German doctorate for many purposes, but they're not the same thing and a translator certainly isn't authorised to turn one into the other
589 days
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45 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): +1
Professor


Explanation:
English does not use dual titles in the German manner (Professor Doktor Schnabeltasse) and usually uses the most senior title, in this case "Professor".
In this context it would also be wrong to call him Professor Schnabeltasse Ph.D. as this use is usually reserved for academic papers (and perhaps very formal documents such as this certificate which is being presented).

Reference: my brother who is a Professor Doktor (of German) at a university in the English-speaking world.

transatgees
United Kingdom
Local time: 11:21
Native speaker of: English

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  John Bowden: I agree - but how is this different from my answer above?
2 mins
  -> Sorry. I did not read your response in full as your heading did not contain "professor". Will the enquirer please disregard my answer.
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