beidpolig an Klemmen geführt

English translation: with both poles routed to terminals

GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
German term or phrase:beidpolig an Klemmen geführt
English translation:with both poles routed to terminals
Entered by: Michael Bailey

18:46 Apr 28, 2005
German to English translations [PRO]
Tech/Engineering - Electronics / Elect Eng / relays
German term or phrase: beidpolig an Klemmen geführt
One of the characteristics of a relay is:

Max. Schaltstrom: 3A beidpolig an Klemmen geführt

I understand the Max. Schaltstrom as being the "Maximum switching current" and presume that the beidpolig relates to the contacts (make & break) but am not sure how "beidpolig an Klemmen geführt" is best translated.
Michael Bailey
Austria
Local time: 07:50
with both poles routed to terminals
Explanation:
As above.
Selected response from:

Darin Fitzpatrick
United States
Grading comment
thanks - and switched current comment noted - must have been getting late!
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer



Summary of answers provided
4 +1or is it?
jccantrell
4 +1with both poles routed to terminals
Darin Fitzpatrick
3Connected by clip (or clamp) on both poles
Laszlo Szabo


  

Answers


6 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +1
beidpolig an Klemmen geführt
or is it?


Explanation:
I would understand this to mean that both the positive and negative lines (poles) are routed to terminals, brought out to terminals, or some such. I do not take 'beidpolig' to deal with contacts, other than the positive and negative contacts are being referenced.

My thoughts from the USA.

jccantrell
United States
Local time: 22:50
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 455

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Laurens Landkroon: I understand jccantrel's view, but think that you have to translate "an Klemmen gefuhrt", "to clamp" would be my best guess, however, if the "Klemmen" refer to something different, "terminal voltage" or "secondary wiring" could also be an option......
13 mins
  -> Careful, 'clamped' in the USA can also mean that there is circuitry to prevent going over a certain voltage, i.e, "clamped at 15 volts", see http://www.deiaz.com/power_control.htm

neutral  Darin Fitzpatrick: Note that in electrical context, "Klemme" is "terminal" - not "clamp."
2 hrs
  -> I thought that was what I said....
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

1 hr   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +1
beidpolig an Klemmen geführt
with both poles routed to terminals


Explanation:
As above.

Darin Fitzpatrick
United States
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 32
Grading comment
thanks - and switched current comment noted - must have been getting late!

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Oliver Walter: and Schaltstrom is "switched current" (not switching current). Look it up at http://domino.iec.ch/iev/iev.nsf/Welcome?OpenForm
3 hrs
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

1 hr   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5
beidpolig an Klemmen geführt
Connected by clip (or clamp) on both poles


Explanation:
I know it is a current and not a wire, but the Klemme is tool to connect a wire.

Laszlo Szabo
Local time: 07:50
Native speaker of: Native in HungarianHungarian
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)



Login or register (free and only takes a few minutes) to participate in this question.

You will also have access to many other tools and opportunities designed for those who have language-related jobs (or are passionate about them). Participation is free and the site has a strict confidentiality policy.

KudoZ™ translation help

The KudoZ network provides a framework for translators and others to assist each other with translations or explanations of terms and short phrases.


See also:

Your current localization setting

English

Select a language

Term search
  • All of ProZ.com
  • Term search
  • Jobs
  • Forums
  • Multiple search