Mit freundlichem kollegialem Gruß

English translation: With kind regards/Yours sincerely

GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
German term or phrase:Mit freundlichem kollegialem Gruß
English translation:With kind regards/Yours sincerely
Entered by: Woodstock

16:38 Jun 7, 2007
German to English translations [PRO]
Law/Patents - General / Conversation / Greetings / Letters
German term or phrase: Mit freundlichem kollegialem Gruß
This is the umpteenth letter in an endless exchange between a British and a German lawyer. Now, all of a sudden, the "Sehr geehrter Herr" in the beginning has changed to "Sehr geehrter Herr Kollege", and the "Mit freundlichen Grüßen" has changed to "Mit freundlichem kollegialem Gruß". How do I express this slight change of tone in English? So far, I have used "Dear Mr." and "Yours sincerely".
Tobias Ernst
Germany
Local time: 18:39
With kind regards
Explanation:
Having taught innumerable correspondence courses to German managers and staff, including how to differentiate between formal and informal forms of address and closes, I would recommend changing the close to "With kind regards" if you want to express the change in register, which is the next degree of informality in an all-purpose close in English correspondence. The books I used were all of British origin, and a very common formal British English sign-off still in use is "Yours faithfully". As already stated several times, we don't really use the "collegial" part in an English close that I'm aware of.

Hope this helps. :-)
Selected response from:

Woodstock
Germany
Local time: 18:39
Grading comment
Many of you have deserved credit, but I can only select one answer in KudoZ. Following the invaluable input from all of you, I have decided to go with

Dear Mr. X
...
With best regards,
Yours sincerely,
XY

Steffen: I admit I didn't see the previous coverings of this issue, but now I am glad that I asked anyway.

Textklick: Thanks again for your input!

With kind regards,
Tobias
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer



Summary of answers provided
4 +2With kind regards
Woodstock
3 +2Yours sincerely
Peter Bajorek
5Yours sincerely/yours fraternally
AllegroTrans
4Yours sincerely
David Moore
3 +1Dear Colleague ..... With Collegial Greetings, Yours Sincerely,
Joern Gaedcke
4warmest regards
Courtney Sliwinski
3sincerely, your colleague
Maureen Millington-Brodie
3Cordially yours
Brandis (X)


Discussion entries: 2





  

Answers


5 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5 peer agreement (net): +2
Yours sincerely


Explanation:
Personally, I think that German people add a lot more variation to correspondence forms that the English do. I think it is perfectly acceptable to stick to plain old "Yours sincerely".

Peter Bajorek
Local time: 17:39
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Textklick: Dear Dr. Ernst/Yours sincerely becomes Dear Tobias (assuming first name terms)/With kind/best regards, Yours sincerely. Members of the professions prefer to stay a little "stuffy" here, particularly if they are writing something which will be on record.
3 hrs

agree  Astrid Elke Witte
7 hrs
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5 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
Yours sincerely


Explanation:
There's no way you can express the change of tone in English, IMHO; I'd perhaps add a little note, if I'd done all the translation work, telling my English customer of the change in emphasis from the German side, but I can't say whether it's even desirable without knowing the whole story!

David Moore
Local time: 18:39
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 39
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4 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5
Yours sincerely/yours fraternally


Explanation:
We DON'T usually express this nuance in English - yours faithfully and your sincerely are pretty well universal. SOMETIMES (not often) I have seen lawyers & doctors, for example, sign off as "yours fraternally" but it is rare and I don't think you need to translate as anything other than "yours sincerely".

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 6 mins (2007-06-07 16:44:54 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

"Dear Colleague" would, I suggest, be acceptable for the commencement of a letter in your context.

AllegroTrans
United Kingdom
Local time: 17:39
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 23

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
neutral  Richard Benham: "Yours fraternally" is probably best left for the union movement....
1 hr
  -> OK but surely you aren't neutral on "yours sincerely" which was my 1st suggestion

neutral  Textklick: With Richard. Maybe O.K. for writing to the Provincial Grand Master: Added: sure Allegro, I agree with that. Do we vote on a "first past the post" basis, first complete solution, or should we go for proportional representation? ;-)
3 hrs
  -> and what about my first suggestion? Are you neutral on this??
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8 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5
sincerely, your colleague


Explanation:
this might cover it

Maureen Millington-Brodie
United Kingdom
Local time: 17:39
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 11
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13 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5
Cordially yours


Explanation:
or I have observed people using " many cordialement" that did not sound bad either.

Brandis (X)
Local time: 18:39
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish, Native in GermanGerman

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
neutral  Textklick: An interesting observation
3 hrs
  -> Thank you for the comments.
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1 hr   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +2
With kind regards


Explanation:
Having taught innumerable correspondence courses to German managers and staff, including how to differentiate between formal and informal forms of address and closes, I would recommend changing the close to "With kind regards" if you want to express the change in register, which is the next degree of informality in an all-purpose close in English correspondence. The books I used were all of British origin, and a very common formal British English sign-off still in use is "Yours faithfully". As already stated several times, we don't really use the "collegial" part in an English close that I'm aware of.

Hope this helps. :-)

Woodstock
Germany
Local time: 18:39
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish, Native in GermanGerman
PRO pts in category: 4
Grading comment
Many of you have deserved credit, but I can only select one answer in KudoZ. Following the invaluable input from all of you, I have decided to go with

Dear Mr. X
...
With best regards,
Yours sincerely,
XY

Steffen: I admit I didn't see the previous coverings of this issue, but now I am glad that I asked anyway.

Textklick: Thanks again for your input!

With kind regards,
Tobias

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Courtney Sliwinski: I think this sounds less informal than the Sincerely yours, and that is the difference you are looking for
1 hr
  -> Thank you, Courtney.

neutral  Textklick: In a letter, "With kind/best/ regards" would be followed by "Yours sincerely". Added: Madam, the neutrality of my comment does not constitute disagreement per se. It was merely tendered as a complement to your suggestion.
2 hrs
  -> In this case I speak with the authority of 10 years of teaching (past and present), using Cornelsen and Oxford textbooks, so I know that this is correct./Lol, Tex! Your wording sounds as if you think yours is the ONLY option. Writing has its drawbacks!

agree  Marcus_UKDE
8 hrs
  -> Thanks, Marcus.
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2 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
warmest regards


Explanation:
Just another option. Gives it a more personal touch. I agree with everyone else that the English language does not usually convey such relationships in the saluations or closings of letters.

Courtney Sliwinski
Local time: 18:39
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
neutral  Textklick: A bit too cute?
1 hr
  -> I think it streeses the colleague aspect
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5 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5 peer agreement (net): +1
Dear Colleague ..... With Collegial Greetings, Yours Sincerely,


Explanation:
Why not use the 'German' phrase in the translation ? It is not a letter written in English by an Englishman after all. So why should the translation pretend to be that?
And 'my' version makes it clear that is it a translation and at the same time shows a change in tone. And the expression 'Dear Colleague' is certainly one that is correctly understood in English, I think.

Joern Gaedcke
Singapore
Local time: 01:39
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: German
PRO pts in category: 8

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Anu Mukharji-Gorski
2654 days
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