Asylberechtigter

English translation: granted asylum

GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
German term or phrase:Asylberechtigter
English translation:granted asylum
Entered by: Eszter Bokor

13:59 Jun 22, 2007
German to English translations [PRO]
Social Sciences - Government / Politics
German term or phrase: Asylberechtigter
Jene Person, die bereits Asyl erhalten hat. Ich kenne "asylum seeker", aber keinen Begriff für Menschen, deren Antrag bereits genehmigt wurde.
Eszter Bokor
Austria
Local time: 16:17
granted asylum
Explanation:
In the UK asylum seekers who meet all the necassary criteria are granted asylum. Google will give you bucket loads of hits.
Selected response from:

paulcje
Local time: 16:17
Grading comment
Thanks!
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer



Summary of answers provided
3 +7s.o. entitled to political asylum
Martin Wenzel
4 +1granted asylum
paulcje
4 +1explanation: difference btw. refugee and "Asylberechtigter"
Barbara Wiegel
3refugee
Armorel Young


Discussion entries: 5





  

Answers


7 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +1
granted asylum


Explanation:
In the UK asylum seekers who meet all the necassary criteria are granted asylum. Google will give you bucket loads of hits.

paulcje
Local time: 16:17
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 4
Grading comment
Thanks!

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
neutral  Francis Lee (X): Bear in mind that not all asylum seekers who meet the necassary criteria are actually granted asylum.
1 hr

agree  monbuckland: Yes, Francis, but they would be "Asylsuchende" rather than "berechtigte"
7 hrs
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7 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5 peer agreement (net): +7
s.o. entitled to political asylum


Explanation:
Was Du meinst ist "Asylbewerber" asylum-seeker or political refugee

Martin Wenzel
Germany
Local time: 16:17
Native speaker of: Native in GermanGerman, Native in EnglishEnglish

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Axel Seyler (X): exactly
7 mins

agree  Maudarg (X)
26 mins

agree  Anita Cassidy
38 mins

agree  Alison Jenner
1 hr

agree  Barbara Wiegel: I looked it up in the terminology database of the German Federal Government - the translation section of the BMI translated it just like this - "person entitled to asylum".
3 hrs

agree  Julia Heath
7 hrs

agree  Claudia Mark
2 days 6 hrs
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11 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5
refugee


Explanation:
Once you have been granted asylum you are technically a refugee.

However, I guess you could also use the term "person granted asylum" if you wanted to remain closer to the German word.

"A person who is seeking to be recognized as a refugee is an asylum seeker. In the United States a recognized asylum seeker is known as an asylee."
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Refugee


Armorel Young
Local time: 15:17
Native speaker of: English
PRO pts in category: 34
Notes to answerer
Asker: "Asylee" seems to fit quite well. I don't know how well-used the term is in general, but according to your explanatiun it is exactly what I was looking for.

Asker: Though there is one detail that is not quite clear: it would stand for "recognized asylum seekers", or asylum seekers who have already been granted asylum? I'm looking for the latter.


Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
disagree  lisa23: sorry, but refugee is not correct IMHO, a refugee can be anything, seeking asylum or not,
6 mins
  -> While not all refugees are asylberechtigt, that doesn't stop all Asylberechtige being refugees

agree  Lancashireman: Also disagree with previous poster that a refugee can be 'anything' and with the later poster who has missed the asker's request for a 'Begriff' rather than a cumbersome explanatory phrase (as proposed and multiply endorsed elsewhere on this page).
1 hr
  -> Thank you, Andrew

agree  Nicole Schnell: Please see my note above
2 hrs

disagree  Barbara Wiegel: There is a difference between a refugee and a person entitled to asylum - see explanation below
3 hrs
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3 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +1
explanation: difference btw. refugee and "Asylberechtigter"


Explanation:
The difference between a refugee and a person entitled to asylum is in the right to stay.
Once you were granted asylum (lets say in Germany) you have the right to stay indefinitely there. The only reason why your status as someone entitled to asylum can be revoked is when you decide to return to your country of origin - the one you claimed you were persecuted.
As a person with refugee status you are entitled to stay in Germany only temporarily until the difficult situation (usually war or civil war) in your country of origin has been resolved. This is the status most people who fled their country have. If you are an Iraqi refugee and all of a sudden the war in your country miraculously ends, you will be sent back because there is no reason any longer for you not to be in your country. (Remember - a few years ago there was a big controversy if it was legitimate to send all those ex-Yugoslav refugees back to the Balkans because there was no war there any more. But most of them had lived for a decade or longer in Germany, their kids were born there etc.)
There are only very few "Asylberechtigte" because of this right to stay indefinitely. Only about 1% of the asylum applications are actually granted - because the authorities usually assume that most reasons for people to flee their country are only of a temporary nature and that's why there is no need to grant "political asylum" to war or civil war refugees.

Source of information: my husband has been working for 4 years in the legal department of the Foreign Office and deals with basic questions of German immigration law and visa issuance in German diplomatic missions.

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Note added at 3 hrs (2007-06-22 17:53:48 GMT)
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correction of typo: the one you claimed you were persecuted --in--.

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Note added at 4 hrs (2007-06-22 18:04:48 GMT)
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It seems as if there are many "Asylanten" around in Germany. But those are "only" the asylum seekers - the people who applied for asylum and wait for a decision to be taken. As you are probably well aware of, it usually takes years for a decision to be taken which then can be contested a couple of times which again can take years. During this time they are, of course, allowed to remain in Germany - on a legal basis. They are just not allowed to work. Most of them won't get the asylum granted but are allowed instead to remain as "(civil) war refugees" until it will be safe for them to return to their countries.

Barbara Wiegel
Germany
Local time: 16:17
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: German
PRO pts in category: 4

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
neutral  Lancashireman: The asker has specifically requested a 'Begriff' though I feel sure she will be grateful for attempts by you and MW to provide lengthy explanations.
1 hr
  -> Well, the term would be "person entitled to asylum" as provided by Martin

agree  casper (X): Would the term 'eligible asylee' fit the bill?
11 hrs
  -> Yes, that sounds good - if "asylee" is a common term in this context. I just have never come across it.
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