Lebenswelt

English translation: (the) life and times

GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
German term or phrase:Lebenswelt
English translation:(the) life and times
Entered by: Claudia Mark

08:34 Jul 31, 2007
German to English translations [PRO]
Art/Literary - History
German term or phrase: Lebenswelt
Die LEBENSWELTEN der Markgräfin Wilhelmine von Preußen

it´s a website translation and it´s about the Margravine Willhelmine of Bayreuth

---> what about: the life of Margravine Wilhelmine of Prussia??? or Margravine Wilhelmine of Prussia´s life???
Thanks!
Claudia Mark
Germany
Local time: 22:25
(the) life and times
Explanation:
This is probably the most common equivalent in English. Try Googling "life and times of".

As it's for a website I would tend to assume the register is more historical than philosophical ("lifeworld"), right? I think the author is just trying to be fancy in writing Lebenswelten here. As Ken says, "lifeworld" (which sounds a bit New Age-y) isn't a suitable term for a gneral audience.
But Armorel is right to ask for more background info! I'd as such put a higher confidence rating - but it'd be nice to know if my hunch is right.

What's the context/readership??

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Note added at 2 hrs (2007-07-31 11:06:18 GMT)
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Thanks for the info! War doch nicht so schwer die rauszurücken, oder? ;-)
p.s. I'd avoid "margravine" (it's the correct term but nobody would understand it) and just stick to "princess".
Selected response from:

Francis Lee (X)
Local time: 22:25
Grading comment
thank you very much Francis, I think this phrase I like most
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer



Summary of answers provided
3 +3lifeworld
Armorel Young
3 +2(the) life and times
Francis Lee (X)
3 +1the life and world of...
Kieran McCann
3 +1life
Henry Schroeder


  

Answers


10 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5 peer agreement (net): +1
life


Explanation:
I agree with your formulation, but to avoid the double "of", I would formulate it like this:

Margravine Wilhelmine of Prussia and Her Life



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Note added at 30 mins (2007-07-31 09:05:48 GMT)
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Writeaway's question prompted me to look some more and one option caught my attention:

Jane Austen: A Life

Our limited knowledge of your text limits the possibilities, but this formulation or something like it (Margravine... : Her Life) might be even better.

Henry Schroeder
United States
Local time: 16:25
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 32

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  writeaway: you have actually seen such a title in English: XXX and her life? /ok. it exists.
2 mins
  -> Here's an example: http://www.google.de/search?q="and+his+life"&hl=de // You are right, however, that it is not ideal. But we don't have more to go on. I noticed that such titles in English often include a: "his/her life in..."
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32 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5 peer agreement (net): +3
lifeworld


Explanation:
The trouble with using "life" is that that back-translates as "Leben" and you then have to ask why the original writer didn't just write "das Leben von ....". Lebenswelt has different connotations - see e.g. this article:-

Lifeworld (German: Lebenswelt) is a concept used in philosophy and in some social sciences, meaning the world "as lived" prior to reflective re-presentation or analysis.

Edmund Husserl introduced the concept of the lifeworld in his Crisis of European Sciences (1936) following Martin Heidegger's analysis of Being-in-the-world (In-der-Welt-Sein) in Being and Time. The concept was still further developed by students Jan Patočka, the Husserlian Alfred Schütz, Maurice Merleau-Ponty, Jürgen Habermas, and others.

For Habermas, lifeworld is more or less the "background" environment of competences, practices, and attitudes representable in terms of one's cognitive horizon. It's the lived realm of informal, culturally-grounded understandings and mutual accommodations. Rationalization of the lifeworld is a keynote of Habermas's 2-volume Theory of Communicative Action. Penetration of lifeworld rationality by bureaucracy is analyzed by Habermas as 'colonization of the lifeworld'.

Social coordination and systemic regulation occur by means of shared practices, beliefs, values, and structures of interaction, which may be institutionally based. We are inevitably lifeworldly, such that individuals and interactions draw from custom and cultural traditions to construct identities, define situations (at best, by coming to understandings, but also by negotiations), to coordinate action, and create social solidarity. (See also: Seidman, 1997:197)

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lifeworld

What you use is going to depend partly on the style of this website and who it is aimed at - you don't say whether it is popular or academic, and that information would be important in deciding how to translate the title.

Armorel Young
Local time: 21:25
Native speaker of: English
PRO pts in category: 40

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  writeaway: I agree-we rarely get any meaningful context with such questions and I for one have given up asking. So this is perfectly feasible, depending on the register of the website. but who knows. we'll see what the English looks like once it's up and running?
5 mins

agree  Ken Cox: good comments -- I wouldn't suggest 'lifeworld' for a general audience, but it might be just the right term for art critics or philosophers
6 mins

agree  Stephan Elkins: Whatever the context in this case might be - as pointed out by Armorel, lifeworld is definitely the common translation in the social sciences and philosophy
2 hrs

neutral  Kieran McCann: point taken about context, but I think the standard sociological rendering is ruled out by the plural: you can only have one lifeworld (the totality of your social/cultural/everyday experience) for Habermas and his pals to colonise...
5 hrs
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2 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5 peer agreement (net): +2
(the) life and times


Explanation:
This is probably the most common equivalent in English. Try Googling "life and times of".

As it's for a website I would tend to assume the register is more historical than philosophical ("lifeworld"), right? I think the author is just trying to be fancy in writing Lebenswelten here. As Ken says, "lifeworld" (which sounds a bit New Age-y) isn't a suitable term for a gneral audience.
But Armorel is right to ask for more background info! I'd as such put a higher confidence rating - but it'd be nice to know if my hunch is right.

What's the context/readership??

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2 hrs (2007-07-31 11:06:18 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Thanks for the info! War doch nicht so schwer die rauszurücken, oder? ;-)
p.s. I'd avoid "margravine" (it's the correct term but nobody would understand it) and just stick to "princess".

Francis Lee (X)
Local time: 22:25
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 103
Grading comment
thank you very much Francis, I think this phrase I like most
Notes to answerer
Asker: yes, I think "life and times" would fit; its about a description of the city Bayreuth and its historic background. I think it is for a calendar of events. Therefore only short senteces are used. The whole text: Wilhelmine von Preußen - Europas letzte Prinzessin. Die Lebenswelten der Markgräfin Wilhelmine von Bayreuth: Preußisches Königtum, barocke Baukunst und höfische Lebensart


Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  writeaway: how can I not agree?
9 mins

agree  Paul Cohen
56 mins
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6 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5 peer agreement (net): +1
the life and world of...


Explanation:
Don't disagree violently with 'life and times', but the context belatedly provided makes it clear that we're not talking about her 'times' generally, but rather three specific areas of life/activity/behaviour in which she was engaged/involved ie three 'worlds' in which she lived. I'd like to write 'the life and worlds of' but we can't say that in English so this is the closest to it.

Seems to be a fairly well established usage: http://www.google.co.uk/search?hl=en&q="life and world of"&m...



Kieran McCann
United Kingdom
Local time: 21:25
Native speaker of: English
PRO pts in category: 8

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  conny
17 hrs
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