aus der Zeit der Völkerwanderung

English translation: Iron Age (Migration Period)

GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
German term or phrase:Völkerwanderung
English translation:Iron Age (Migration Period)
Entered by: Nicole Tata

13:51 Jun 2, 2003
German to English translations [PRO]
History / history
German term or phrase: aus der Zeit der Völkerwanderung
Das einzige im Originalzustand erhaltene Schiff aus der Zeit der Völkerwanderung wird dort für ein Jahr im Nationalmuseum zu sehen sein.

I'm completely stumped! Retaining the German is not an option, so how do I explain this in English? Anything with 'migration of peoples' in it is a non-starter, in my view. Help, please!
Nicole Tata
Local time: 23:40
(European) Migration Age
Explanation:
would be my suggestion -

www.thetroth.org/resources/ourtroth/migrat.html (among others)

I wouldn't bother explaining it for a UK/US audience. 10 to 1 most Germans couldn't explain what the Völkerwanderung was anyway.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2003-06-02 16:55:17 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

or \"Migration period\" (or \"Migration Period\"). Several decent hits (as well as a lot of duff ones) for - nydam \"migration period\" -

I\'ll have to come clean and admit that most of the hits for - nydam \"migration age\" - are pretty dodgy.
Selected response from:

TonyTK
Grading comment
Wow, what a great response! After much googling and head scratching, I concluded that 'Migration Period' probably fits best. I also managed to find some references for the Nydam ship where it was described as dating back to the Iron Age! So I'll use that, too. Thanks Tony and everyone else for all your suggestions.
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer



Summary of answers provided
5 +1Age of (the) invasions/migrations
Lars Finsen
5Volkerwanderung
Simona de Logu
5from the time of the migration of the nations
Ellen Zittinger
4from the time of the viking invasions
Daniel Jeory
4From the era of tribal migration.
roneill
4the era of the Wandering of Peoples (Volkerwanderung)
Robert Schlarb
4from the era of the great wandering of [Germanic] peoples
Mary Wilburn
3 +1(European) Migration Age
TonyTK
4wandering of the people
Steffen Walter
4that's the English for Voelkerwanderung[en]
gangels (X)
4at the time of mass migration
izy
3my try
Ron Stelter
3mass exodus, mass migration
Cilian O'Tuama
1Ask the customer
David Moore (X)


Discussion entries: 1





  

Answers


4 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5
my try


Explanation:
at the time of the nomadic migration of the (Germanic?) tribes

trying to avoid your "non-starter"

Ron Stelter
Local time: 17:40
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

5 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
wandering of the people


Explanation:
should be an option -> see sources below

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2003-06-02 14:02:26 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

http://www.cast.uark.edu/student_pubs/david_holt/introductio... suggests \"people movements\"

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2003-06-02 14:04:47 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

*Falls* Du doch das Dt. lassen solltest, solltest Du eine engl. Entsprechung in Klammern ergänzen. Im wissenschaftlichen Kontext wird der dt. Begriff oft auch ins Engl. übernommen.


    Reference: http://www.wikipedia.org/wiki/Voelkerwanderung
    Reference: http://www.thesocialcontract.com/pdf/five-one/critique.pdf
Steffen Walter
Germany
Local time: 00:40
Native speaker of: Native in GermanGerman
PRO pts in category: 50

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
neutral  Robert Schlarb: which "people" --> migratio gentium --> peoples (i.e. Goths, Vandals, Avars, Langobards etc.)
51 mins
  -> right, peoples would have been more appropriate
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

5 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
that's the English for Voelkerwanderung[en]


Explanation:
from the era of the barbarian invasions

Sounds meaner than the German, but all history books call it that. There actually were waves, culminating in Theoderich's sacking of Rome

gangels (X)
Local time: 16:40
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish, Native in GermanGerman
PRO pts in category: 4
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

6 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
at the time of mass migration


Explanation:
or emigration of nations; also found invasion of the barbarians, but not so sure in this one!


    Reference: http://dict.leo.org
izy
Local time: 23:40
Works in field
Native speaker of: German
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

6 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5
mass exodus, mass migration


Explanation:
alternatives - you haven't exactly spoilt us with context :-)

Cilian O'Tuama
Germany
Local time: 00:40
Native speaker of: English
PRO pts in category: 16

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
neutral  Daniel Jeory: thanks!
20 hrs
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

7 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5
Volkerwanderung


Explanation:
In English the German word is used, spelled slightly differently.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2003-06-02 14:06:55 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

dating back to the Volkerwanderung

Simona de Logu
United Kingdom
Local time: 23:40
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish, Native in GermanGerman

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Michael Stolte: specifically when it has to do with the Germanic Tribes invading Rome and Constantinople
19 mins

disagree  gangels (X): totally wrong
1 hr
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

27 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5 peer agreement (net): +1
(European) Migration Age


Explanation:
would be my suggestion -

www.thetroth.org/resources/ourtroth/migrat.html (among others)

I wouldn't bother explaining it for a UK/US audience. 10 to 1 most Germans couldn't explain what the Völkerwanderung was anyway.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2003-06-02 16:55:17 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

or \"Migration period\" (or \"Migration Period\"). Several decent hits (as well as a lot of duff ones) for - nydam \"migration period\" -

I\'ll have to come clean and admit that most of the hits for - nydam \"migration age\" - are pretty dodgy.


TonyTK
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 4
Grading comment
Wow, what a great response! After much googling and head scratching, I concluded that 'Migration Period' probably fits best. I also managed to find some references for the Nydam ship where it was described as dating back to the Iron Age! So I'll use that, too. Thanks Tony and everyone else for all your suggestions.

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Heike Behl, Ph.D.: with Migration Period (capitalized)
11 hrs
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

51 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
from the era of the great wandering of [Germanic] peoples


Explanation:
A still not completely explainable mass migration of Germanic tribes occurred during the Roman period. The wanderers represented "Voelker," not just a single "Volk." They settled in the areas of Europe that still today bear their names, or derivatives thereof, in Scandinavia, on the North Sea (Frisians, Franks, Alamans, Jutes, Angles, Saxons), and east of the Elbe (Lombards, Bugundians, Goths), etc.


    see Davies, EUROPE, pp. 222-223
Mary Wilburn
United States
Local time: 18:40
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

1 hr   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): +1
Age of (the) invasions/migrations


Explanation:
English language historians seem to most often talk about this period (marking the end of the Empire and the beginning of the Middle Ages) from the Roman perspective and call it the "Age of (the) Invasions", but "Age of Migrations" which is also used, I think is more accurate. You will find "Age of (the) Barbarian Invasions/Migrations" too, as well as "Age of (the) Germanic Invasions/Migrations", but the latter is very inaccurate, since the Germanic peoples were only one of the several groups that were on the move.

Lars Finsen
Local time: 00:40
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Native in NorwegianNorwegian

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Ellen Zittinger: closes
1 hr
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

1 hr   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
the era of the Wandering of Peoples (Volkerwanderung)


Explanation:
It is not just about Germanic tribes; some of the tribes were in fact Slavic (Avars) and the Huns were in fact Central Asian.
"Volkerwanderung" is most often spelled without an Umlaut because American and British editors cannot deal with the Umlaut.

--
Slavs and other peoples migrated in response to the pressures of something like a demographic Rubic's Cube. As one people or "tribe" moved, others moved perforce and/or were absorbed. The movements of Gothic peoples, both Visigoths [West Goths] and Ostrogoths [East Goths] were a powerful cause of demographic flux. Slavs shifted westward and southward in rhythm with the pan-European flux, a phenomenon the Germans call Volkerwanderungen, the wandering of peoples.



    Reference: http://www.uoregon.edu/~kimball/sac.0000.1682.htm
Robert Schlarb
Local time: 00:40
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish, Native in GermanGerman
PRO pts in category: 16
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

1 hr   confidence: Answerer confidence 1/5Answerer confidence 1/5
Ask the customer


Explanation:
which "Volkerwanderung" exactly he had in mind; as stated at several points above, there have been waves of them; according to the English web-sites (which use the exact term), they seem to have started in 2,450 BC; there were more waves in the years 600-500 BC; then in the 4th-6th Centuries, then the 8-9th; if you want to chance it, I'd back the Germanic Volkerwanderungen of the late 4th Century, which continued, with interruptions, until the middle ages.
But see the sites above, 'cos I really don't know!

David Moore (X)
Local time: 00:40
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 36
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

2 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5
from the time of the migration of the nations


Explanation:
my take

Ellen Zittinger
Local time: 15:40
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish, Native in GermanGerman
PRO pts in category: 4
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

3 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
From the era of tribal migration.


Explanation:
All of these words are so loaded nowadays
"people" "nation" etc.

In my opinion, "tribal" reinforces the historical reference. It might be a good idea to ask your client exactly which migration he or she had in mind.

roneill
United States
Local time: 15:40
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

4 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
from the time of the viking invasions


Explanation:
Nicole, based on the context you've provided this seems to be about the viking invasions. These are often referred to in two ways: as invasions or as voyages. I think I'd tend to steer away from the German.
Depending on perspective, you could either translate it as 'the only ship...from the time of the viking invasions...' or 'from the time of the viking voyages...'.
Hope this helps.

Daniel Jeory
Local time: 23:40
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)



Login or register (free and only takes a few minutes) to participate in this question.

You will also have access to many other tools and opportunities designed for those who have language-related jobs (or are passionate about them). Participation is free and the site has a strict confidentiality policy.

KudoZ™ translation help

The KudoZ network provides a framework for translators and others to assist each other with translations or explanations of terms and short phrases.


See also:

Your current localization setting

English

Select a language

Term search
  • All of ProZ.com
  • Term search
  • Jobs
  • Forums
  • Multiple search