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Entgelt-Rahmentarif-Abkommen (ERA)

English translation: collective wage and salary agreement

GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
German term or phrase:Entgelt-Rahmentarif-Abkommen (ERA)
English translation:collective wage and salary agreement
Entered by: Steffen Walter

17:10 Apr 30, 2005
German to English translations [PRO]
Bus/Financial - Human Resources
German term or phrase: Entgelt-Rahmentarif-Abkommen (ERA)
Die Tarifvereinbarung für den ERA (Entgelt-Rahmentarif-Abkommen) ist in ... seit Mitte April unterschrieben.

I found one English-language site where it's mentioned, but not translated. Does anybody know if there is an official translation for it??
Trudy Peters
United States
Local time: 09:06
collective wage agreement
Explanation:
Surely that's what it is.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 37 mins (2005-04-30 17:48:04 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Internet sources use \"pay framework agreement\" or \"wage framework agreement\", although they look very \"translated\" to me (Germans love the word \"Rahmen\", and I suspect that this word often leads us into the temptation of producing translatorese).
http://www.eiro.eurofound.eu.int/2002/11/feature/de0211204f.... (pay framework agreement)
http://www.keiper.de/Keiperinternet/internet.nsf/FrameByKey/... (wage framework agreement)

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 47 mins (2005-04-30 17:57:41 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Note on your search for an \"official translation\":
An \"official translation\" is usually a suggestion by a colleague of ours, and we as professionals can evaluate and adapt these suggestions as we feel appropriate. In fact, many of us on this forum have created so-called \"official translations\", or at least, translations which have become common usage.

The only exception to this principles is official titles. If a German ministry gives itself an English title, we are stuck with it even if it makes us throw our hands up in horror -- like the German Economic Ministry which glories in the awful English title:
Federal Ministry of Economics and Labour
(is it devoted to the study of Economics or the control of the economy?)

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 1 hr 37 mins (2005-04-30 18:47:58 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

I notice that your sentence includes an enormous tautology:
Die Tarifvereinbarung für den ERA (Entgelt-Rahmentarif-Abkommen)
i.e. the collective agreement for the collective wage agreement.
You have two alternatives: either you hide behind a smokescreen word (such as \"framework\" -- this may be necessary if you have a fussy customer who makes the quality of the text dependent on whether the German managers understand it), or you cut out the repetition and say what the text really means, i.e.:
The collective wage (and salary?) agreement (ERA) was signed in the middle of April.
Selected response from:

Victor Dewsbery
Germany
Local time: 15:06
Grading comment
Looks like that's what it is!
Thanks to everyone for your input.
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer



Summary of answers provided
3 +3collective wage agreement
Victor Dewsbery


Discussion entries: 5





  

Answers


22 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5 peer agreement (net): +3
collective wage agreement


Explanation:
Surely that's what it is.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 37 mins (2005-04-30 17:48:04 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Internet sources use \"pay framework agreement\" or \"wage framework agreement\", although they look very \"translated\" to me (Germans love the word \"Rahmen\", and I suspect that this word often leads us into the temptation of producing translatorese).
http://www.eiro.eurofound.eu.int/2002/11/feature/de0211204f.... (pay framework agreement)
http://www.keiper.de/Keiperinternet/internet.nsf/FrameByKey/... (wage framework agreement)

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 47 mins (2005-04-30 17:57:41 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Note on your search for an \"official translation\":
An \"official translation\" is usually a suggestion by a colleague of ours, and we as professionals can evaluate and adapt these suggestions as we feel appropriate. In fact, many of us on this forum have created so-called \"official translations\", or at least, translations which have become common usage.

The only exception to this principles is official titles. If a German ministry gives itself an English title, we are stuck with it even if it makes us throw our hands up in horror -- like the German Economic Ministry which glories in the awful English title:
Federal Ministry of Economics and Labour
(is it devoted to the study of Economics or the control of the economy?)

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 1 hr 37 mins (2005-04-30 18:47:58 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

I notice that your sentence includes an enormous tautology:
Die Tarifvereinbarung für den ERA (Entgelt-Rahmentarif-Abkommen)
i.e. the collective agreement for the collective wage agreement.
You have two alternatives: either you hide behind a smokescreen word (such as \"framework\" -- this may be necessary if you have a fussy customer who makes the quality of the text dependent on whether the German managers understand it), or you cut out the repetition and say what the text really means, i.e.:
The collective wage (and salary?) agreement (ERA) was signed in the middle of April.

Victor Dewsbery
Germany
Local time: 15:06
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 46
Grading comment
Looks like that's what it is!
Thanks to everyone for your input.

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  David Moore: Certainly looks like that from where I'm sitting too...(Added) Too right....but then, that so often seems to be what the German writer likes - thinks it sounds impressive.......huh???
1 hr
  -> Thanks. Do you take my point on the tautology, too? (Added) Thanks. Nice to get a second opinion on that point.

agree  silfilla: on all points :-); not to mention that it should be *das* Abkommen, not *den* :-) // in my experience? more! LOL
1 hr
  -> Good point. If their German is sloppy, will they then be *more* or *less* critical if Trudy cuts out the tautology?

agree  Ian M-H (X)
16 hrs
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