Erlaß

English translation: waiver, remission

GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
German term or phrase:Erlaß
English translation:waiver, remission
Entered by: Shane London

13:15 Apr 27, 2005
German to English translations [PRO]
Law/Patents - Law (general) / Criminal Law
German term or phrase: Erlaß
Im übrigen kann ich einen Antrag auf förmlichen Erlaß der gegen Sie verhängten Freiheitsstrafe erst nach Ablauf des xx.x.2005 stellen.

There are entries in the glossaries for 'Erlaß' but they do not cover the meaning in this context. That is 'release' rather than 'decree'. I would like to find the correct English expression here.
Shane London
Australia
Local time: 11:12
waiver, remission
Explanation:
Doing time was waived.
Selected response from:

Carmen Berelson
United States
Local time: 21:12
Grading comment
I think I will stick with 'remission' as I am in Australia and we seem to stay with British terminology. Derek's idea was tempting though.
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer



Summary of answers provided
5 +6waiver, remission
Carmen Berelson
4 +1pardon
gangels
3 +2vacation
Derek Gill Franßen
4remission (of sentence)
desiderata (X)
4waiver
lucasm (X)
4 -1acquittal
swisstell


Discussion entries: 2





  

Answers


1 min   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): +6
Erlaß
waiver, remission


Explanation:
Doing time was waived.

Carmen Berelson
United States
Local time: 21:12
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Native in GermanGerman
PRO pts in category: 20
Grading comment
I think I will stick with 'remission' as I am in Australia and we seem to stay with British terminology. Derek's idea was tempting though.

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  lucasm (X): Quicker on the draw.
4 mins

agree  Kim Metzger: Remission of sentence seems to apply here.
8 mins

agree  Frosty: Having a jail sentence shortened is often referred to as a remission of sentence
25 mins

agree  silfilla: special remission of your sentence; NOTE: *remission of sentence* is used when someone gets time off for good behavior etc.; otherwise, use Derek's suggestion (*vacate/set aside*)
32 mins

agree  Margaret Marks: Remission would be the British term
6 hrs

agree  desiderata (X): Sorry, answer here already. See my links below.
7 hrs
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3 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): -1
Erlaß
acquittal


Explanation:
fits best in this context


    Reference: http://dict.leo.org
swisstell
Italy
Local time: 03:12
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: German
PRO pts in category: 128

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
neutral  Kim Metzger: You might try looking up the legal definition of acquittal: http://jurist.law.pitt.edu/dictionary.htm
1 hr

disagree  silfilla: see my note above
2 hrs
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4 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
Erlaß
waiver


Explanation:
In certain contexts:

http://www.english.uni-mainz.de/program/exchange/direktusa/
Erlass der campus fees und Studiengebühren für 15 Semesterwochenstunden (Gegenwert ca. $15.000).



lucasm (X)
Local time: 03:12
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
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19 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5 peer agreement (net): +2
Erlaß
vacation


Explanation:
I knew that would get your attention - I would translate the whole phrase "Antrag auf förmlichen Erlaß der gegen Sie verhängten Freiheitsstrafe" as "motion to vacate the sentence" or "motion to set aside the sentence" (sometimes you find both of them together).

;-)

Black's Law Dictionary, 2nd Pocket Ed., defines "vacate" as "[...] 2. To nullify or cancel; make void; invalidate <the court vacated the judgment>."

Black's also has this to say: "set aside, vb. (Of a court) to annul or vacate (a judgment, order, etc.) <the judge refused to set aside the default judgment>."

Both are used quite often, for example, by convicts on death row.
:-(

Derek Gill Franßen
Germany
Local time: 03:12
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: English
PRO pts in category: 728

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  silfilla: definitely the verbal phrase (vacate/set aside); ADDED: Astrid: "vacate a sentence" is perfect (US) English
10 mins

agree  Astrid Elke Witte: "set aside" seems to sound better to English ears
41 mins

neutral  Anne Gillard-Groddeck: set aside is what I have come across most often, but I don't read criminal cases
8 hrs
  -> I get the feeling that the terms are all used by the courts interchangeably (cf. Philip's first reference), or that there are merely minimal differences between "remit" and "vacate" / "set aside" (which are synonyms). :-)
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2 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +1
pardon


Explanation:
He was formally convicted and now asks for a pardon

gangels
Local time: 19:12
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish, Native in GermanGerman
PRO pts in category: 249

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  silfilla: good choice, too
50 mins
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7 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
Erlaß
remission (of sentence)


Explanation:
As indicated in documents linked below.


    Reference: http://www.usdoj.gov/osg/briefs/1990/sg900435.txt
    Reference: http://www.ucl.ac.uk/laws/global_law/german-cases/print_bver...
desiderata (X)
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 64

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
neutral  Derek Gill Franßen: I'm not saying that "remission" would be wrong (if the sentence is to be shortened), but it is only mentioned once in your first reference (in a cite), whereas the word "vacate" is used several times (I haven't looked at your second reference yet). ;-)
1 hr
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