Klammersicherung

English translation: tendon locking mechanism

GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
German term or phrase:Klammersicherung
English translation:tendon locking mechanism
Entered by: Kim Metzger

21:40 Apr 27, 2005
German to English translations [PRO]
Science - Livestock / Animal Husbandry
German term or phrase: Klammersicherung
Durch diese Sicherung fallen Vögel beim Schlafen nicht vom Ast!

Is there a specific word for this??
MSH
Local time: 01:18
tendon locking mechanism
Explanation:
Why don’t birds fall off their perches when they are sleeping?
Believe it or not, it takes less effort for a bird to stay on its perch than to let go of it. When a bird lands on a perch or a tree branch, tendons in its legs automatically tighten and its toes grip tight. This “locking mechanism” keeps the bird from falling off its perch when it falls asleep.

http://www.yesmag.bc.ca/Questions/BirdPerch.html

This tendon locking mechanism (TLM) exists opposite the proximal phalanges of each toe and pollex of many bats.

Since many birds have a TLM similar to that of bats, it is an excellent example of the convergent evolution of a feature brought about by similar functional pressures on birds and bats.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&d...
Selected response from:

Kim Metzger
Mexico
Local time: 19:18
Grading comment
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer



Summary of answers provided
4 +2tendon locking mechanism
Kim Metzger
2tendon
Michael McWilliam
1Tendon???
Laurens Landkroon


  

Answers


17 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 2/5Answerer confidence 2/5
tendon


Explanation:
Just a guess...see link


    Reference: http://www.enaturalist.org/topic.htm?topic_ID=60
Michael McWilliam
United States
Local time: 18:18
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
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35 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +2
tendon locking mechanism


Explanation:
Why don’t birds fall off their perches when they are sleeping?
Believe it or not, it takes less effort for a bird to stay on its perch than to let go of it. When a bird lands on a perch or a tree branch, tendons in its legs automatically tighten and its toes grip tight. This “locking mechanism” keeps the bird from falling off its perch when it falls asleep.

http://www.yesmag.bc.ca/Questions/BirdPerch.html

This tendon locking mechanism (TLM) exists opposite the proximal phalanges of each toe and pollex of many bats.

Since many birds have a TLM similar to that of bats, it is an excellent example of the convergent evolution of a feature brought about by similar functional pressures on birds and bats.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&d...


Kim Metzger
Mexico
Local time: 19:18
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 114

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Laurens Landkroon: I am certainly agree with you about your thorough description, Kim, but I would have to pass on the exact definition, in that I don't have a clue what it would be, I mean........
7 mins

agree  VerenaH (X): I'm impressed!
9 hrs
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45 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 1/5Answerer confidence 1/5
Tendon???


Explanation:
I don't want to make the same suggestion that has already been made, but I would want to take this opportunity to apologize for my pretty stupid grammatical mistake in my own "agree" answer.........

Laurens Landkroon
Local time: 02:18
Native speaker of: Native in DutchDutch, Native in EnglishEnglish
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