Schafskälte

English translation: cold snap during June

GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
German term or phrase:Schafskälte
English translation:cold snap during June
Entered by: British Diana

15:36 Jun 22, 2010
German to English translations [PRO]
Science - Meteorology / popularv terms to describe weather phenomena
German term or phrase: Schafskälte
I would like to include the English equivalent of "Schafskälte" in a report I am writing on an event I just took part in which was marred by the "sheep's chill cold snap", which is what a rival site comes up with. I'm convinced we KudoZers can provide something better! So please come out with your bright ideas!

BTW I hope this question does not only reach the meteorology experts among us. Should I have put it under idioms???
British Diana
Germany
Local time: 01:28
cold snap during June
Explanation:
Could be translated as simply "cold snap", but that doesn't get the entire idea across that the word refers to this event happening in June, when it's supposed to be very warm. "Summer cold snap" could get the same idea across.
Selected response from:

Ross_22
Local time: 19:28
Grading comment
Well, unless I end up giving a lengthy explanation (where I probably wouldn't be able to resist using "ewe tremble") this is the best bet as it is reasonably self-explanatory. Many thanks to all for your help!
P.S. The ewes need tremble no more, it's over 20 degrees and sunny here in Germany now!
3 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer



Summary of answers provided
3 +1cold snap during June
Ross_22
4 -1characteristic June cold snap
Dr. Georg Schweigart
Summary of reference entries provided
Since the author of the report is BRITISH Diana ...
Lancashireman
Scottish equivalent - yow-trummle (ewe tremble)
Alison MacG

Discussion entries: 7





  

Answers


3 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): -1
characteristic June cold snap


Explanation:
My spontaneous idea was "mid-June cold snap", but since it is not only "mid" (it may also be early-June), your own idea seems wonderful for me and I suggest it. If you refer to "sheep", you would have to explain what this means and again you would have to mention that it is in June. Thus, without sheep, I recommend.

Dr. Georg Schweigart
Germany
Local time: 01:28
Native speaker of: German

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
disagree  Lancashireman: Characteristic of where? This would leave a speaker of (British) English perplexed.
21 hrs
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5 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5 peer agreement (net): +1
cold snap during June


Explanation:
Could be translated as simply "cold snap", but that doesn't get the entire idea across that the word refers to this event happening in June, when it's supposed to be very warm. "Summer cold snap" could get the same idea across.

Ross_22
Local time: 19:28
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 3
Grading comment
Well, unless I end up giving a lengthy explanation (where I probably wouldn't be able to resist using "ewe tremble") this is the best bet as it is reasonably self-explanatory. Many thanks to all for your help!
P.S. The ewes need tremble no more, it's over 20 degrees and sunny here in Germany now!

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
neutral  Dr. Georg Schweigart: 1.) since it is a very particular cold snap, a cold snap just accidentally happening "during June" is not strong enough; 2.) officially, "summer" starts on 21 June, then the time of "Schafskälte" is already over, so "summer cold snap" seems misleading
12 hrs

agree  Lancashireman: It's a 'cold snap' and it's during the month of June. QED
19 hrs
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Reference comments


1 day 4 hrs
Reference: Since the author of the report is BRITISH Diana ...

Reference information:
... perhaps your (certainly cultured) readers would appreciate the personal touch. It depends on whether your article is constrained by length:
"Despite the fact that we are now into June, the weather was rather chilly. Although I was surprised by the relatively low temperature for the time of year, the locals weren’t. Apparently this particular week of June has a reputation for producing sudden cold snaps. In fact, they have a special name for the phenomenon – Schafskälte (‘sheep’s cold’) – a regional farming reference."

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Note added at 1 day4 hrs (2010-06-23 20:11:27 GMT)
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Sorry, wrong box.

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Note added at 1 day4 hrs (2010-06-23 20:33:52 GMT)
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Because when you're giving a literal translation in brackets, there should be no compromise to make it sound more sensible.

Lancashireman
United Kingdom
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
Note to reference poster
Asker: Andrew, why don't you write the whole article for me ;-) Here I would say "sheep's chill" though. It makes the image of those freezing lambs just that bit more vivid.

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1 day 17 hrs
Reference: Scottish equivalent - yow-trummle (ewe tremble)

Reference information:
Diana, you won't be able to use this, but I couldn't resist posting it!

As used in the Hugh MacDiarmid poem The Watergaw

Ae weet forenicht i' the yow-trummle
(One wet-dusk in the ewe-tremble)

Okay, you ask, so what's a ewe-tremble? It's apparently a Scots expression, at one time well-known, which means a cold spell in summer after sheep shearing.

Only the Scots could ever have decided there was the need for a word which means a cold spell after the sheep shearing...
http://tomconoboy.blogspot.com/2007/08/yow-trummle.html

Clarifying the meaning of 'watergaw' as a shimmering or indistinct rainbow, or the 'yow-trummle' as the spell of cold weather common in Scotland after the summer sheep-shearing, however, reinforces for the reader MacDiarmid's belief in Scots as capable of expression unattainable in English.
http://www.bbc.co.uk/scotland/arts/writingscotland/writers/h...

Alison MacG
United Kingdom
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
Note to reference poster
Asker: Alison, you made my day! I will start using your wonderful Scottish term to make it better-known as it really fits very well. English English does lack such colourful expressions, but there's nothing to stop us adopting them, is there?

Asker: "Imitation is the sincerest form of flattery"

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