1. Deutsche Wriggelmeisterschaft

English translation: to punt

GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
German term or phrase:wriggeln
English translation:to punt
Entered by: Krokodil

08:51 May 30, 2003
German to English translations [PRO]
/ Boating
German term or phrase: 1. Deutsche Wriggelmeisterschaft
Am I right in assuming that this is some kind of rowing or sculling (as opposed to wriggling) championship in English?

(For the record, it's taking place in Beverungen (on the River Weser) from July 3rd to 6th.)
Krokodil
Germany
Local time: 15:35
Punting
Explanation:
from the verb "to punt", which is from the noun "punt": a long, flat-bottomed open boat with square ends, propelled by a pole pushed against the bed of the river, etc. The verb "to punt" means to propel (a punt, etc.) by means of a pole. Punt also has a number of other meaings, but this is the meaning in this context. Now, as to whether this fits the "Wriggeling" or not, I can't say...

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2003-05-30 09:36:08 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

So, punting is very similar to \"Wriggling\" but not identical; the pole in punting is not normally in a rowlock, or similar device, and punting also depends on shallow water. Cambridge University is the classic support for punting, on the River Cam which runs through the town and along the back of many of the University\'s college buildings.

Probable the best idea is to use \"similar to punting, but also in much deeper water\" as a description.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2003-05-30 09:40:36 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Incidentally, there are many many punting champioships in England (mostly on the River Thames), and some of them go back quite a few years.
Selected response from:

David Moore
Local time: 15:35
Grading comment
Seems to fit pretty well. Thanks also to Rowan for the informative website!
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer



Summary of answers provided
4 +1Punting
David Moore
1Some pictures.
Rowan Morrell


Discussion entries: 1





  

Answers


23 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 1/5Answerer confidence 1/5
Some pictures.


Explanation:
You may have already seen these, but if not, here are some pictures from about the only detailed site that seems to exist on this "Wriggel-Meisterschaft". As you can see, it involves steering a boat by means of a pole of single oar that is attached to the boat's stern. The person in the boat appears to stand in order to steer it.

Hopefully a boat expert may be able to tell you what these things are called in English!


    Reference: http://www.schifferverein-herstelle.de/Bilder/bilder.html
Rowan Morrell
New Zealand
Local time: 01:35
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 1459
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

33 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +1
Punting


Explanation:
from the verb "to punt", which is from the noun "punt": a long, flat-bottomed open boat with square ends, propelled by a pole pushed against the bed of the river, etc. The verb "to punt" means to propel (a punt, etc.) by means of a pole. Punt also has a number of other meaings, but this is the meaning in this context. Now, as to whether this fits the "Wriggeling" or not, I can't say...

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2003-05-30 09:36:08 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

So, punting is very similar to \"Wriggling\" but not identical; the pole in punting is not normally in a rowlock, or similar device, and punting also depends on shallow water. Cambridge University is the classic support for punting, on the River Cam which runs through the town and along the back of many of the University\'s college buildings.

Probable the best idea is to use \"similar to punting, but also in much deeper water\" as a description.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2003-05-30 09:40:36 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Incidentally, there are many many punting champioships in England (mostly on the River Thames), and some of them go back quite a few years.

David Moore
Local time: 15:35
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 9638
Grading comment
Seems to fit pretty well. Thanks also to Rowan for the informative website!

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Rowan Morrell: I wondered about punting, although I thought punts were a little flatter than the ones shown in the Web site I indicated. But this is probably the closest fit.
2 days 23 hrs
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)



Login or register (free and only takes a few minutes) to participate in this question.

You will also have access to many other tools and opportunities designed for those who have language-related jobs (or are passionate about them). Participation is free and the site has a strict confidentiality policy.

KudoZ™ translation help

The KudoZ network provides a framework for translators and others to assist each other with translations or explanations of terms and short phrases.


See also:

Your current localization setting

English

Select a language

Term search
  • All of ProZ.com
  • Term search
  • Jobs
  • Forums
  • Multiple search