kontinentalfranzösisch

English translation: European French

GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
German term or phrase: kontinentalfranzösisch
English translation:European French
Entered by: Marco Schaumloeffel

14:31 Jan 21, 2006
German to English translations [PRO]
Art/Literary - Poetry & Literature / medieval literature
German term or phrase: kontinentalfranzösisch
Hello all,

This is a type of medieval literature - my text refers to "kontinentalfranzösische Handschriften". Just "Continental French", or something less obvious/more specialised?

Thanks much!
Hilary Davies Shelby
United States
Local time: 12:48
European French
Explanation:
ja, "Continental French", aber ich würde "European French" vorschlagen, es klingt besser, denn auch auf anderen Kontinenten wird Französisch gesprochen. Dieses "continental" is noch ein bisschen von der Zeit der Kolonien...
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Marco Schaumloeffel
Local time: 13:48
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Selected automatically based on peer agreement.
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer



Summary of answers provided
4 +3European French
Marco Schaumloeffel
4 +3mainland/ continental French
David Hollywood
3 +1old French/ oil French (ancien francais)
Henry Schroeder
2old French handwriting
Jonathan MacKerron


Discussion entries: 1





  

Answers


9 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +3
kontinentalfranzösisch
European French


Explanation:
ja, "Continental French", aber ich würde "European French" vorschlagen, es klingt besser, denn auch auf anderen Kontinenten wird Französisch gesprochen. Dieses "continental" is noch ein bisschen von der Zeit der Kolonien...

Marco Schaumloeffel
Local time: 13:48
Native speaker of: Native in PortuguesePortuguese, Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 4
Grading comment
Selected automatically based on peer agreement.

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Ricki Farn: Jaja, immer diese Inselbriten, die (Rest-)Europa als "the continent" bezeichnen ;-)
5 mins
  -> Danke!

agree  Tradesca (X)
14 mins
  -> Danke!

agree  Eugenia Lourenco
5 hrs

neutral  Andrea Hauer: naja, da es sich um mittelalterliche Literatur handelt, bin ich mir nicht sicher ob ich den "Europa"-Begriff reinbringen würde ...
5 hrs

neutral  Ulrike Kraemer: Stimme Andrea zu. Im Mittelalter wurde auch in England (zumindest in Adelskreisen) Französisch gesprochen. (William the Conqueror kam schließlich aus Frankreich.) Außerdem bezeichnen die Engländer den Rest von Europa heute noch als "the continent" .
19 hrs
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5 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +3
kontinentalfranzösisch
mainland/ continental French


Explanation:
Car rental in mainland france offers the perfect opportunity to I would say ....

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Note added at 6 mins (2006-01-21 14:37:47 GMT)
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I would go for "mainland"

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Note added at 7 mins (2006-01-21 14:38:50 GMT)
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medieval or no :)

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Note added at 10 mins (2006-01-21 14:42:22 GMT)
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although "continental" is maybe a wee bit "catchier" :)

David Hollywood
Local time: 14:48
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 50

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Jonathan MacKerron: "continental French" gets some convincing googles
4 hrs
  -> thx Johnathan :)

agree  Andrea Hauer
5 hrs
  -> vielen Dank Andrea :)

agree  Ulrike Kraemer
19 hrs
  -> vielen Dank Littlebalu :)
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5 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 2/5Answerer confidence 2/5
kontinentalfranzösisch
old French handwriting


Explanation:
gets some interesting googles

Jonathan MacKerron
Native speaker of: English
PRO pts in category: 67
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25 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5 peer agreement (net): +1
kontinentalfranzösisch
old French/ oil French (ancien francais)


Explanation:
With the squiggle under c and two dots over the "i" in oil

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Note added at 27 mins (2006-01-21 14:59:31 GMT)
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Care should be taken to differentiate these two uses of the term:

Langue d'oïl is an Old French term meaning language of oïl -- i.e. language in which the word for "yes" is oïl. Modern-day languages of this family are also referred to in English as Oïl languages. Since the latter half of the 20th century the tendency in French has been to refer to the languages in the plural as langues d'oïl to clearly distinguish one language taken in isolation or the linguistic grouping as a whole.
The term langue d'oïl is also used in a historical sense to refer to Old French, which was distinguished from another Gallo-Romance variety, the langue d'oc, by the word meaning "yes" in those languages. Vulgar Latin developed different methods of signifying assent: hoc ille ("that is it") and "hoc" ("that"), which became the langues d'oil and langue d'oc (or occitan language), respectively. The subsequent development of "oïl" into "oui" can be seen in modern French. (Other Romance languages derive their word for yes from the Latin sic, "thus", such as the Spanish sí, Italian sì, or Portuguese sim.)

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Note added at 1 day21 hrs (2006-01-23 12:06:17 GMT)
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Here you go Hillary, this should give you some more options, even "middle French". I would recommend reading through the wikipedia entry below (where this passage came from):

Up to roughly 1340, the Romance languages spoken in the Middle Ages in the Northern half of what is today's France are collectively known as "ancien français" ("Old French") or "langues d'oïl" (languages where one says "oïl" to mean "yes"): following the Germanic invasions of France in the fifth century, these Northern dialects had developed distinctly different phonetic and syntactical structures from the languages spoken in Southern France (collectively known as "langues d'oc" or the Occitan language family, of which the largest group is the Provençal language). The Western peninsula of Brittany spoke Breton, a Celtic language. Catalan was spoken in the South, and Germanic languages and Francoprovençal were spoken in the East.

The various "Langues d'oïl" and "Langue d'oc" dialects developed into what are recognised as regional languages today. Languages which developed from dialects of Old French include: Bourguignon, Champenois, Franc-Comtois, Francien (theoretical), Gallo, Lorrain, Norman, Anglo-Norman (spoken in England after the Norman Conquest of 1066), Picard, Poitevin-Saintongeais, and Walloon. Languages which developed from dialects of the Occitan family include: Auvergnat, Gascon, Languedocien, Limousin, Provençal.

Because of the Norman Conquest of England in 1066, medieval French was also spoken in the Anglo-Norman realm, including England, from (1066-1204).

From 1340 to the beginning of the seventeenth century, a generalized French language became clearly distinguished from the other competing Oïl languages. This is refered to as Middle French ("moyen français") and would be the basis of Modern French. Although French gradually became an important cultural and diplomatic language, it made few inroads into Occitan and other linguistic regions other than in areas where the French monarchy had established significant control.

http://66.249.93.104/search?q=cache:O46AC_8rftUJ:en.wikipedi...



    Reference: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/French_language
Henry Schroeder
United States
Local time: 13:48
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 88
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in this pair and field What is ProZ.com Project History(SM)?

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  franglish: Very learned contribution, Henry! With the info such as it stands, I'd go for 'Old French'.
47 mins
  -> Rather silly I suppose. Thought I would take the impetus provided by Hillary to learn a little bit about old French and came across this. Only I couldn't figure out if there was a different name for the French spoken in Great Britain.

neutral  Ricki Farn: Ich weiß nicht, ob man da mehr behauptet, als der Originaltext hergibt; dafür müsste man noch mehr über die verschiedenen Variationen von Französisch auf dem "Kontinent" (und, damals, wo noch?) wissen
1 hr
  -> Completely agree, but it brings in a distinctly medieval element - we don't have to worry about confusing it with contemporary French
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