sprachliche Betreuung

English translation: linguistic adviser

GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
German term or phrase:sprachliche Betreuung
English translation:linguistic adviser
Entered by: ENGSOL

19:42 Apr 29, 2005
German to English translations [PRO]
Printing & Publishing
German term or phrase: sprachliche Betreuung
This is the function or the 'title' of a person on a textbook editorial team. It appears in the imprint section of the book next to the person's name.

My customer, a German publishing house, has been using the term "linguistic advisor" in its English textbooks to describe the English native speakers who proofread the texts written by German authors.

Is that the most elegant solution, I wonder?

Can anyone think of a term that sounds slightly less grand than *editor* (that's the *Herausgeber*, in this case) but not quite as unimportant as *proofreader*? ;-)

TIA
ENGSOL
linguistic advisor
Explanation:
This person is neither an editor nor a proofreader, but an expert whose background may include a degree/training in linguistics, and who probably works as a consultant to ensure linguistic accuracy.
There is nothing wrong with this term.
Selected response from:

Teresa Reinhardt
United States
Local time: 15:58
Grading comment
Thanks to everyone for the intelligent input. I've decided to keep the "linguistic adviser" (yes, it was "adviser" in the original - but thanks anyway, Andrew and Erik). I must say, I thought along the same lines as Andrew when I first read the term. The "linguistic" just sounded too technical or academic to my ears. (BTW, a bit of googling revealed that "language adviser" is very often used to describe a student advisor, e.g. in a university language department). I also like Textclick's suggestion (linguistic reviewer) and I'll run it by my customer. Thanks again for taking the trouble to split a few hairs here :-) http://www.tlhs.org/l_hair118.jpg
3 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer



Summary of answers provided
5 +4linguistic advisor
Teresa Reinhardt
4 +3Linguistic reviewer
Textklick
3 +4language adviser
Lancashireman
4error minimizers/underpaid students/linguistic dogsbodies
Francis Lee (X)
4linguistic advisor
Sandy A Pirie
3editorial responsibility
Rolf Bueskens


Discussion entries: 5





  

Answers


9 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): +4
linguistic advisor


Explanation:
This person is neither an editor nor a proofreader, but an expert whose background may include a degree/training in linguistics, and who probably works as a consultant to ensure linguistic accuracy.
There is nothing wrong with this term.


Teresa Reinhardt
United States
Local time: 15:58
Native speaker of: Native in GermanGerman, Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 11
Grading comment
Thanks to everyone for the intelligent input. I've decided to keep the "linguistic adviser" (yes, it was "adviser" in the original - but thanks anyway, Andrew and Erik). I must say, I thought along the same lines as Andrew when I first read the term. The "linguistic" just sounded too technical or academic to my ears. (BTW, a bit of googling revealed that "language adviser" is very often used to describe a student advisor, e.g. in a university language department). I also like Textclick's suggestion (linguistic reviewer) and I'll run it by my customer. Thanks again for taking the trouble to split a few hairs here :-) http://www.tlhs.org/l_hair118.jpg

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  silfilla
4 mins

agree  Armorel Young
34 mins

agree  Erik Macki: In U.S. English "adviser" is now standard (per Merriam-Webster, American Heritage, etc.).
3 hrs

agree  Sonia Soros
10 hrs
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11 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5 peer agreement (net): +4
language adviser


Explanation:
If the target readership is UK, please consider using ‘adviser’ rather than 'advisor'. A ‘linguistic adviser’ would know everything about languages from the dawn of humanity to the present age. ‘Language advisers’ are simply competent and confident in the usage of their native tongue.

Lancashireman
United Kingdom
Local time: 23:58
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 52

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Laurens Landkroon: If you look at the context, this would certainly make more sense than "linguistic advisor" ; the readers probably don't make a big deal of the difference, but for one thing, this word combination sounds/reads less academic,,,,,,,
23 mins

agree  Susanne Rindlisbacher
1 hr

agree  Erik Macki: This solution is also just fine. However, a primary definition of "linguistic" is "of or pertaining to language(s)," so you may be splitting a hair that only academics would appreciate.
3 hrs
  -> Hair splitting can be tremendous fun. What participant in this forum could resist the opportunity to split a hair or two? Without a regular supply of hairs to split our evenings would be that much duller ;-)

agree  Maureen Millington-Brodie
2 days 21 hrs
  -> Thanks, Maureen! Greetings from one 'language adviser' to another ('expressis verbis')
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20 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
linguistic advisor


Explanation:
These people may indeed also have editorial functions going beyond mere proofreading - tracking down pictures, suggesting alterations in exercises, perhaps even re-writing (creatively) badly composed or grammatically incorrect copy.
'linguistic advisor' in my opinion gives an indication of such duties and responsibilities.
Sometimes people are simply thanked on such a page eg
'Special thanks are due to x,y, and z for their help and advice'

Sandy A Pirie
Local time: 23:58
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 4
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30 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +3
Linguistic reviewer


Explanation:
In my personal experience, 'LA's are used more in recording work.

I think 'LR' also sounds grander than proofreader, for what it's worth. Splitting hairs, I suppose it should be review, rather than reviewer.

Textklick
Local time: 23:58
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: English
PRO pts in category: 52

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Mario Marcolin
2 hrs
  -> Thanks Mario

agree  Erik Macki: This is a great solution to this problem. A reviewer sounds better than a proofreader but is clearly beneath the editor.
3 hrs
  -> Thanks Erik

agree  jerrie: Absolutely!
3 days 15 hrs
  -> Thanks Jerrie
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2 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5
editorial responsibility


Explanation:
It simply sound 'more English' to me.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2 hrs 38 mins (2005-04-29 22:21:19 GMT)
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sound => sounds


    Professional experience
Rolf Bueskens
Local time: 08:58
Native speaker of: Native in GermanGerman
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1 day 13 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
error minimizers/underpaid students/linguistic dogsbodies


Explanation:
That's what they are, after all. Native speakers who stoop so low as to "proofread" English written by Germans cannot IMO be termed professional editors or advisors.

Francis Lee (X)
Local time: 00:58
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 4
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