Eilkrankheit

English translation: hurry sickness

GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
German term or phrase:Eilkrankheit
English translation:hurry sickness
Entered by: Kim Metzger

12:25 Nov 28, 2012
German to English translations [PRO]
Medical - Psychology
German term or phrase: Eilkrankheit
This means the negative effects on a person’s health of a fast-paced modern lifestyle—multitasking, full appointment calendar, etc. Does a generally accepted English term for this already exist? Is it burnout? The translation is for laypeople, most not native speakers, many youngsters, so if the answer turns out to be an obscure technical term I guess I’ll just have to explain it in parentheses but I’d love to avoid that in the title/headline. UK/US=egal
misterherrnau
hurry sickeness
Explanation:
With automation of the workplace in “full swing” by the 1970s, large numbers of women began entering the work force and an “awareness of stress rose to the forefront” [15] In the publication Type A Behavior and Your Heart, cardiologists Meyer Friedman and Ray H. Rosenman wrote about the “hurry sickness” common to “workaholics”—people who had no friends and who “never relaxed or went to museums”
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Work–life_balance_(United_State...

Hurry Sickness
A malaise in which a person feels chronically short of time, and so tends to perform every task faster and to get flustered when encountering any kind of delay
http://medical-dictionary.thefreedictionary.com/Hurry Sickne...

Beeinträchtigtes psychisches Befinden gehört zu den häufigsten Ursachen für mangelhafte Arbeitsleistung. Die als „Hurry Sickness“ bezeichnete Neigung, möglichst viele Aktivitäten gleichzeitig zu tun, fördert die Orientierungslosigkeit und vermindert die Handlungs- und Entscheidungsfähigkeit.
http://wiki.iao.fraunhofer.de/index.php/Chronobiologische_Ar...

Selected response from:

Kim Metzger
Mexico
Local time: 03:08
Grading comment
Thank you! This does indeed sound like something that Turkish guy would post but if Fraunhofer accepts it, who am I to argue?
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer



Summary of answers provided
3 +4hurry sickeness
Kim Metzger
4Stress-related illness(es)
Kate Collyer
1 +2acceleromania
Daniel Bird
3no-time disease
Michael Martin, MA


  

Answers


13 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5 peer agreement (net): +4
hurry sickeness


Explanation:
With automation of the workplace in “full swing” by the 1970s, large numbers of women began entering the work force and an “awareness of stress rose to the forefront” [15] In the publication Type A Behavior and Your Heart, cardiologists Meyer Friedman and Ray H. Rosenman wrote about the “hurry sickness” common to “workaholics”—people who had no friends and who “never relaxed or went to museums”
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Work–life_balance_(United_State...

Hurry Sickness
A malaise in which a person feels chronically short of time, and so tends to perform every task faster and to get flustered when encountering any kind of delay
http://medical-dictionary.thefreedictionary.com/Hurry Sickne...

Beeinträchtigtes psychisches Befinden gehört zu den häufigsten Ursachen für mangelhafte Arbeitsleistung. Die als „Hurry Sickness“ bezeichnete Neigung, möglichst viele Aktivitäten gleichzeitig zu tun, fördert die Orientierungslosigkeit und vermindert die Handlungs- und Entscheidungsfähigkeit.
http://wiki.iao.fraunhofer.de/index.php/Chronobiologische_Ar...



Kim Metzger
Mexico
Local time: 03:08
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 64
Grading comment
Thank you! This does indeed sound like something that Turkish guy would post but if Fraunhofer accepts it, who am I to argue?
Notes to answerer
Asker: WOW, pretty fast!


Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Armorel Young: I'm sure the spelling mistake was just the result of Eilkrankheit :-)
23 mins
  -> Oops!

agree  Michael Martin, MA: sounds good to me - without that extra "e"
47 mins

neutral  Lancashireman: Chinglish? Meyer Friedman and Ray H. Rosenman seem to have taken on the speech patterns of Asia.
1 hr

agree  Steffen Walter: I buy your E ;-)
1 hr

agree  Claudia Coja: http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/hurry sickness
2 hrs
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6 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5
no-time disease


Explanation:
Not the most elegant form of expressing the concept but also little danger of being misunderstood..


    Reference: http://www.yoga-abode.com/node/1851
Michael Martin, MA
United States
Local time: 04:08
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in GermanGerman, Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 112
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11 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
Stress-related illness(es)


Explanation:
Surely the usual term for these pressures on modern life is stress?


    Reference: http://www.humanillnesses.com/original/Se-Sy/Stress-Related-...
    Reference: http://www.stressrelatedillness.com/
Kate Collyer
United Kingdom
Local time: 09:08
Native speaker of: English
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23 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 1/5Answerer confidence 1/5 peer agreement (net): +2
acceleromania


Explanation:
Yes you're right, I just made that up.
Good luck
DB

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Note added at 1 day5 hrs (2012-11-29 18:02:48 GMT)
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::::::::::::::::::::::::::

...that comment deserves capital pun-ishment...

Daniel Bird
United Kingdom
Local time: 09:08
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
Notes to answerer
Asker: ... where there's no Bucharest for the wicked!


Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Steffen Walter: speedomania?
1 hr

agree  Anne Schulz: nice one (I also like Steffen's 'speedomania')
7 hrs
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