das Regeln letzter Dinge

English translation: Taking care of final matters

GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
German term or phrase:das Regeln letzter Dinge
English translation:Taking care of final matters
Entered by: Susan Welsh

21:08 Dec 6, 2019
German to English translations [PRO]
Social Sciences - Psychology / palliative care
German term or phrase: das Regeln letzter Dinge
Some of the needs of a dying patient:

Daneben gibt es aber auch den Bedarf, sich mit Themen auseinanderzusetzen, die von Sterbenden und Angehörigen als ressourcenstärkend erlebt werden, etwa das Ziehen einer Lebensbilanz, das Ausdrücken von Dankbarkeit, das Regeln letzter Dinge, der Wunsch nach Versöhnung oder das Finden inneren Friedens.

We don't say "the last things" in English. I thought of "making final arrangements" or "putting one's affairs in order," but both of those sound too "logistical." I'm not sure what the German expression evokes for the reader.
Susan Welsh
United States
Local time: 18:27
Taking care of final matters
Explanation:
"Taking care of "final matters" is important for many women. You can preserve something of yourself by organizing your personal matters and belongings, and by providing for your family. Making arrangements for the things that are important to you can help your loved ones grieve, remember you, and get on with the rest of their lives. This may also include jointly finding new ways to redistribute different tasks and roles." https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/NBK361000/
Selected response from:

Michael Martin, MA
United States
Local time: 18:27
Grading comment
I think this is the best choice, as broadly encompassing whatever is important to the patient, which may or may not have to do with wills, burial arrangements, etc. "Tying up loose ends" signifies trivial things; "finding closure" is very psychological, may not be possible for the person, but he still needs a will, etc.; "putting affairs in order" still to me evokes financial documents, which may or not be most relevant. Thanks, everybody!
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer



Summary of answers provided
3 +4tying up loose ends
Gordon Matthews
3 +3putting one's affairs in order / finding closure
Lancashireman
3 +1Taking care of final matters
Michael Martin, MA


Discussion entries: 4





  

Answers


14 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5 peer agreement (net): +1
Taking care of final matters


Explanation:
"Taking care of "final matters" is important for many women. You can preserve something of yourself by organizing your personal matters and belongings, and by providing for your family. Making arrangements for the things that are important to you can help your loved ones grieve, remember you, and get on with the rest of their lives. This may also include jointly finding new ways to redistribute different tasks and roles." https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/NBK361000/

Michael Martin, MA
United States
Local time: 18:27
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in GermanGerman, Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 112
Grading comment
I think this is the best choice, as broadly encompassing whatever is important to the patient, which may or may not have to do with wills, burial arrangements, etc. "Tying up loose ends" signifies trivial things; "finding closure" is very psychological, may not be possible for the person, but he still needs a will, etc.; "putting affairs in order" still to me evokes financial documents, which may or not be most relevant. Thanks, everybody!

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  traduck
14 days
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18 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5 peer agreement (net): +4
tying up loose ends


Explanation:
"putting their affairs in order" sounds good to me, but "tying up loose ends" might do as a more colloquial alternative.

Gordon Matthews
Germany
Local time: 00:27
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 4

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Kim Metzger
1 hr

agree  Ramey Rieger: perfect
1 hr

neutral  Cilian O'Tuama: No need for colloquial alternative, too flippant IMO, but your "putting affairs in order" could work well.
2 hrs

agree  David Hollywood: with "putting their (or one's) affairs in order"
3 hrs

agree  philgoddard
15 hrs
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2 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5 peer agreement (net): +3
putting one's affairs in order / finding closure


Explanation:
Nothing wrong with your own suggestion. It's not just about tidying the attic, having a clearout of the filing cabinet, writing a will, cancelling the milk.
"Tying up loose ends" (the current leader) sounds too much like a whodunnit.
The context ( das Ausdrücken von Dankbarkeit, das Regeln letzter Dinge, der Wunsch nach Versöhnung) calls for something more solemn, e.g. finding closure.

Lancashireman
United Kingdom
Local time: 23:27
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 51

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  David Hollywood: I would go with this suggestion "putting (one's) affairs in order"... on the button IMO... not so happy about "finding closure"
1 hr

neutral  Cilian O'Tuama: finding closure is more about inner peace, no? Grüße
1 hr
  -> Hi Cilian. It's sandwiched between "das Ausdrücken von Dankbarkeit" and "der Wunsch nach Versöhnung", both of which suggest finding inner peace. Letzte Dinge = final things = closure.

agree  Björn Vrooman: "I'm not sure what the German expression evokes for the reader." -> https://www.caritascare.ch/de/vorsorge/letzte-dinge-regeln.h... -> https://www.moneyadviceservice.org.uk/en/articles/putting-yo...
5 hrs

agree  Thomas Pfann: Putting your affairs in order
12 hrs
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