Generation Golf

English translation: Generation X

GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
German term or phrase:Generation Golf
English translation:Generation X
Entered by: Michael Schubert

16:30 Apr 7, 2005
German to English translations [PRO]
Art/Literary - Social Science, Sociology, Ethics, etc.
German term or phrase: Generation Golf
"Doch insgeheim will die Generation Golf" scheinbar genauso arbeiten wie ihre Eltern: 98% aller 20- bis 30-Jährigen möchten geregelte Arbeitszeiten und ein festes Anstellungsverhältnis"
Context: An article in "Die Welt" about conditions in the workplace in Germany that I am translating with undergraduates. (Do teachers tick the homework-box too?)
As I understand it it means: the apolitical VW golf-driving generation who are the sons and daughters of the highly politicized 68 generation.
Can anyone make a rough stab at an English equivalent?
Sarah Swift
Local time: 19:52
Generation X / Generation Y
Explanation:
"Generation X" (or "gen x") is a very popular term in the US for the children of the post-WWII "baby boom" generation. "Generation Y" is the somewhat less used term for the generation that followed. Your "Generation Golf" seems to have one foot in each. See the Wikipedia links below for more info.

I rate this answer only with a "3" because:
1) Personally, I hate these cheesy phrases :-)
2) I don't know if this fits the context/tone/time span of your translation

BTW, I would disagree with Wikipedia about when Gen X starts: they are the children of the post-WWII baby boomers, so 1961 is a bit premature.
Selected response from:

Michael Schubert
United States
Local time: 10:52
Grading comment
This has been an intriguing discussion...hard to grade. Michael is right that "Generation Golf" seems to have a foot in both the X and the Y camps. When I realized this, I stopped looking for an Irish/British/American equivalent and started thinking about the best way to describe the younger members of "Generation Golf" in English, settling in the end on "the post-wall Generation" , i.e. the generation who came of age in the early nineties.
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer



Summary of answers provided
3 +3Generation X / Generation Y
Michael Schubert
4 +2Generation Golf
Linda Flebus
4Pampers Generation
hbrincker
4Generation X
Katja Bell
2 +1Thatcher's Children
Lancashireman
3new/young generation // the under thirties
Francis Lee (X)
3Bobos
ninarrow1


Discussion entries: 5





  

Answers


10 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5 peer agreement (net): +3
Generation X / Generation Y


Explanation:
"Generation X" (or "gen x") is a very popular term in the US for the children of the post-WWII "baby boom" generation. "Generation Y" is the somewhat less used term for the generation that followed. Your "Generation Golf" seems to have one foot in each. See the Wikipedia links below for more info.

I rate this answer only with a "3" because:
1) Personally, I hate these cheesy phrases :-)
2) I don't know if this fits the context/tone/time span of your translation

BTW, I would disagree with Wikipedia about when Gen X starts: they are the children of the post-WWII baby boomers, so 1961 is a bit premature.


    Reference: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Generation_X
    Reference: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Generation_Y
Michael Schubert
United States
Local time: 10:52
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 8
Grading comment
This has been an intriguing discussion...hard to grade. Michael is right that "Generation Golf" seems to have a foot in both the X and the Y camps. When I realized this, I stopped looking for an Irish/British/American equivalent and started thinking about the best way to describe the younger members of "Generation Golf" in English, settling in the end on "the post-wall Generation" , i.e. the generation who came of age in the early nineties.

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Dr.G.MD (X): I instantaneously had the same idea...
7 mins

neutral  Francis Lee (X): for me, gen X were people who are by now in their 30s; and it seems gen Y are the under 25s
29 mins

agree  jccantrell: That is it for sure in the press. And yes, Baby boomers go up until 1964!
30 mins

agree  linastm
4 hrs
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46 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +2
Generation Golf


Explanation:
Generation Golf

Yet as the millennium drew to a close, a new generation of writers came into play, referred to in western Germany as the "Generation Golf" or the 89ers. Born around 1970, they are the new economy’s foster children, and seem spoilt and lethargic. For them, TV entertainer Harald Schmidt is a more important literary critic than Marcel Reich-Ranicki. Their attitude to life may be described as egocentric, and their own biography is practically the only source material of their texts. Christian Kracht ("Faserland", 1995; "1979", 2001), Benjamin Stuckrad-Barre ("Soloalbum", 1998; "Deutsches Theater", 2001) and Florian Illies ("Generation Golf I und II", 2000/2003; "Anleitung zum Unschuldigsein", 2001) are its literary voices. Their publishers’ advances were so generous that it was as if they were models or pop-stars. They had their own TV shows, such as Stuckrad-Barre’s show on VIVA, or at least an editorial post at the reputed "Frankfurter Allgemeine Zeitung", like Florian Illies. Their affinity for journalism, for column-writing cannot be overlooked; they are zeitgeist writers. In Stuckrad-Barre’s "Soloalbum" (1998), consisting of 28 short text tracks, the first-person narrator pines over a plump sixth-former called Katharina who loves sitcoms and crisps. Not dissimilar to diary entries, these passages sketch out vignettes from everyday life, with the action set in train stations, DIY stores and workshops for housewives. In some descriptions, the author manages to strike an ironic note, putting his finger on linguistic and social clichés.


    Reference: http://www.goethe.de/kug/kue/lit/thm/en73296.htm
Linda Flebus
Belgium
Local time: 19:52
Native speaker of: Native in FlemishFlemish, Native in DutchDutch

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Elimar Orlopp: thank you, great summary, probably written by a baby-boomer
2 hrs

agree  Lancashireman: No translation will satisfy readers on both sides of the Atlantic
3 hrs
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11 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5
new/young generation // the under thirties


Explanation:
I don't see an exact equivalent in English.

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Note added at 41 mins (2005-04-07 17:11:55 GMT)
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\"young adults\" ?

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Note added at 1 hr 7 mins (2005-04-07 17:37:52 GMT)
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\"post-reunification generation\" (assuming this is about Germany)
There are several options, because it then refers specifically to people in their 20s anyway.

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Note added at 1 hr 9 mins (2005-04-07 17:39:52 GMT)
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And the latter suggestion automatically excludes over-30 East Germans, as they grew up without the Golf. Not that I\'d expect \"Die Welt\" to take this into account, but still ...

Francis Lee (X)
Local time: 19:52
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 16

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
neutral  ENGSOL: [edited] Change that to a question: does "Golf" refer to the game or the car? i.e. golf (the game) as a distinguishing feature of this new breed of yuppies...
1 hr
  -> April 1 was last Friday ...

neutral  Elimar Orlopp: You would not call it the "Trabbi" Generation, would you? :-))
3 hrs
  -> wohl kaum !
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4 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
Generation X


Explanation:
To me, "Generation Golf" refers to Thirtysomethings (not Twentysomethings), so Generation X would be the suitable equivalent.

Katja Bell
Germany
Local time: 19:52
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish, Native in GermanGerman

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
neutral  Francis Lee (X): you might want to give Michael an Agree, at least ...
9 hrs

neutral  Lancashireman: I seem to have read this somewhere before...
1 day 2 hrs
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3 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5
Bobos


Explanation:
eine Alternative (siehe Artikel), die Bücher über Bobos und Florian Illies "Generation Golf" zeigen sehr viele Parallelen. Mit "Bobos" hätte man einen genau so eingeführten amerikanischen Begriff, wie "Generation Golf" einer in Deutschland ist.

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Note added at 4 hrs 51 mins (2005-04-07 21:21:51 GMT)
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\"Die Bobos. Der Lebensstil der neuen Elite

David Brooks, leitender Redakteur beim Weekly Standard in Washington, plaudert aus dem Nähkästchen: Er zeichnet das Porträt des \"neuen Establishments\" in den USA, dem er selbst angehört. Die Bobos, diese neue Elite des Informationszeitalters, sind nach Brooks \"bourgeoise Bohemiens\" und bringen damit zusammen, was früher gegensätzlich war: Erfolg und Idealismus, den Rebellionsgeist der 60er und das Yuppietum der 80er.

Brooks beschreibt, wie die Bobos an die Macht gekommen sind, wie sie leben, denken und arbeiten. All das ist unterhaltsam und mit einer guten Portion Selbstironie geschrieben. In bezug auf gesellschaftliche und soziale Veränderungen bleibt der Blick jedoch auf die Glücksritter Bobos beschränkt, scheint sehr optimistisch und wurde inzwischen zumindest teilweise vom Dot-Com-Crash überholt. Brooks bringt keine Statistiken, keine große Theorie, keine soziologisch fundierte Analyse, sondern eine populäre, lockere und sicher auch informative Beschreibung eines Teils der amerikanischen Gesellschaft. Wer die \"Generation Golf\" gern gelesen hat, der wird sich auch hier amüsieren, und nebenbei ein wenig über die USA lernen.\"

Cornelia Daheim


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Note added at 4 hrs 56 mins (2005-04-07 21:27:34 GMT)
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Aus \"Die Zeit\":

Spätestens seit die großen Gesellschaftsentwürfe verblichen sind, gerät die soziale Begriffsbildung bescheidener. Da und dort erfindet man zwar noch unterhaltsame Soziologeme: die diffuse \"Neue Mitte\", die harmlose \"Generation Golf\", neuerdings Angela Merkels wolkige \"Wir-Gesellschaft\". Doch dass schnell zurechtgezimmerte Schlagworte dieser Art die soziale Situation der Zeit präzise auf den Punkt brächten, behauptet niemand.

Dass es auch anders geht, führen immer wieder amerikanische social critics vor. David Brooks\' munteres Buch über die Bobos, also jene \"bourgeoisen Bohemiens\", die der Autor für die neue Elite des Informationszeitalters hält, ist ein gelungenes Beispiel dafür, wie aufgeweckt sich über gesellschaftliche Trends schreiben lässt. Das Buch, im amerikanischen Original mit dem (viel zutreffenderen) Untertitel The New Upper Class and How They Got There versehen, führt eine einfache These stringent aus: Nach jahrzehntelangem Kulturkampf zwischen dem spießbürgerlichen Mainstream und dessen alternativen Verächtern habe sich in Amerika ein neues soziales und kulturelles Gleichgewicht eingependelt.

Unter den neuen Bedingungen des Informationszeitalters, so Brooks, hätten sich die feindseligen Lager aufeinander zu bewegt. Aus den Aufrührern von einst sind genießerische Materialisten geworden, aus den prüden Spießern tolerante Zeitgenossen mit Hang zu Cappuccino und Konsum. Gemeinsam, verschmolzen zum neuen \"Bobo-Establishment\", genießen sie nun als \"Konservative in Jeans\" ein temperiertes Leben des Genusses und der materiellen Sicherheit. Ziemlich langweilig mag das sein, findet der bekennende Bobo David Brooks sogar selbst. Aber es habe seine Vorteile: \"Vielleicht braucht unser Land jetzt einfach ein bisschen Ruhe, damit sich die neuen gesellschaftlichen Normen stabilisieren können und der Bobo-Konsens greift.\"


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Note added at 5 hrs 0 min (2005-04-07 21:30:53 GMT)
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http://www.dradio.de/dlr/sendungen/zeitreisen/142642/

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Note added at 5 hrs 10 mins (2005-04-07 21:41:11 GMT)
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Süddeutsche Zeitung, 11.05.2001

\"Claudius Seidl kann das modische Buch \"Bobos in Paradise\" des amerikanischen Journalisten David Brooks (das auf deutsch gerade unter dem Titel \"Die Bobos. Der Lebensstil der neuen Elite\" erschienen ist) nicht ganz ernst nehmen: \"Was Brooks im größten Teil seines Buchs beschreibt, ist ein Phänomen, welches man, als europäischer Besucher jedenfalls, eher als Europäisierung denn als Bohemifizierung der USA wahrgenommen hat: Es gibt, nicht nur in den Städten, neuerdings Dinge, die es dort vorher nicht gab – Volvos zum Beispiel oder Umweltbewusstsein, einen Sinn für schlichtes Design und vor allem guten Kaffee und Capuccino, worauf Brooks immer wieder zu sprechen kommt. Was ja in Ordnung ist: Wo es starken Kaffee gibt, kann man auch im Kaffeesatz lesen.\" Und bei uns tut das die \"Generation Golf\"!\"


    Reference: http://www.falter.at/print/F2004_26_1.php
ninarrow1
Germany
Local time: 19:52
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish, Native in GermanGerman

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Elimar Orlopp: ... yes, seems so.
12 mins

disagree  Francis Lee (X): never heard of it, and neither, I assume, have millions of others; you need a widely understood term, here (like in the original) // und "bourgeoise Bohemians" sind sowieso was anderes als die Golf Generation
13 hrs
  -> Das ist erstaunlich, denn der Begriff geht durch die Feuilletons, sowohl im deutsch-, als auch im englischsprachigen Raum....

neutral  Lancashireman: Unfortunately the UK Sunday supplements have failed to report this phenomenon.
1 day 3 hrs
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6 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
Pampers Generation


Explanation:
Another expression referring to the same group (born in the 70s and later). No need to translate that, everyone knows immediately what it means (except in Spain, there Pampers is called Dodot), on both sides of the Atlantic, whereas the "Golf" was branded "Rabbit" in the USA until the 80s.


    Reference: http://www.mind-advertising.com/us/pampers_us.htm
hbrincker
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2 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 2/5Answerer confidence 2/5 peer agreement (net): +1
Thatcher's Children


Explanation:
...a very rough stab at an approximate British equivalent :-)
(BTW How do other cultures refer to the 'Victorian Era'?)

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Note added at 2 hrs 12 mins (2005-04-07 18:43:38 GMT)
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http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/uk_politics/3670179.stm

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Note added at 3 hrs 48 mins (2005-04-07 20:19:09 GMT)
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If only all KudoZ questions were as intellectually challenging as this. It is, however, a blessing that they are not all as culture-dependent as this. The problem with ‘Generation X’ (let alone ‘Bobos’) is that it has about as much resonance in UK as ‘Thatcher’s Children’ will have in California. And presumably neither will have any resonance whatsoever in Galway. Maybe we should ask the Aussies?

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Note added at 3 hrs 59 mins (2005-04-07 20:30:40 GMT)
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The notion of defining a person by the vehicle they drive holds credence in both Germany and UK. The Opel Mantra driver would correspond to ‘Medallion Man’ in UK. Blair aimed the whole of his 2001 election campaign at ‘Mondeo Man’. And as for ‘White Van Man’ you wouldn’t want to mess with him…

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Note added at 7 hrs 43 mins (2005-04-08 00:14:30 GMT)
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Come alive. You\'re in the Pepsi Generation. Come alive with Pepsi.

Lancashireman
United Kingdom
Local time: 18:52
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 76

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Francis Lee (X): And I'm one of them! In itself a good term - but can only apply to Britain // within that context, though, I think it does have the same implication(s) as the German term
10 hrs

neutral  Ian M-H (X): Perfect for the UK
2 days 16 hrs
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