Staatlich gepruefter Maschinenbautechniker

English translation: state certified machinery design technician

13:11 Sep 15, 2000
German to English translations [PRO]
Tech/Engineering
German term or phrase: Staatlich gepruefter Maschinenbautechniker
This is a profession/Beruf/Abschluss from a technical college. Thanks for your help.
Sonya
English translation:state certified machinery design technician
Explanation:
I definitely agree with town313 that one should not use the term "engineer" in any way here, no matter what our dictionaries say, unless the German title Sonja is referring to is "(Diplom)ingenieur so-wie-so" or similar. You can see that immediately in towns313's reference. In Anglo-Saxon countries, an "engineer" has always graduated from a university or college with a BS or MS academic degree. In Germany, the situation is not much different, the "Diplomingenieur" has also studied at a university, "Fachhochschule" or "Technisches Universität" with a period of study of 8 to 12 semesters (as contrasted to a "Fachschule" which is probably meant in Sonja's example).

A further problem here is the "bau" part of the German professional title. This precludes our using any term connected with the operation or maintenance of machinery, such as "machinist". The German professional title refers to the conception, design and construction of an original machine or modifications to existing machines.

The Maschinenbautechniker is also not a draughtsperson (BE) or draftsperson (AE), so where does that leave us?

I think there is no exact, standing Anglo-Saxon term for this profession because we Anglo-Saxons have always thought that the conception and design of machines and other things must be done by an engineer who had been to college, as silly as that is. It may also wrong of the Germans to try to precisely define and train so many thousands of different professions.

My suggestion is an explanatory translation: "state certified machinery design technician".

- HTH - Dan
Selected response from:

Dan McCrosky (X)
Local time: 00:43
Grading comment
Thanks so much for your detailed answer. It was difficult to choose though because of the other answers. Tom Funke had a very respectable source. towns313 was off about the machinist part because this person already had the machinist training (3 years) before he even started the techniker college--but again good sources. xxxskrug had an answer very close to yours, but your explanation was great!
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer



Summary of answers provided
nastate certified machinery design technician
Dan McCrosky (X)
nastate-certified mechanical engineering technician
skrug (X)
naState certified machinist; Board certified machinist
Cami Townsend (X)
nastate-certified mechanical engineer
Tom Funke


  

Answers


12 mins
state-certified mechanical engineer


Explanation:
(source: Oxford-Duden)





    see above
Tom Funke
Local time: 18:43
Native speaker of: English
PRO pts in pair: 2419

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
Dan McCrosky (X)

Natalie Grassmann
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12 mins
State certified machinist; Board certified machinist


Explanation:
You want to be careful not to say "mechnical engineer" here. For a description of "Maschinenbautechniker" see the first URL below. The second describes a "machinist" training program.


    Reference: http://arbeitsamt.de/hst/services/information/bkb/m/6210.htm...
    Reference: http://www.shoreline.ctc.edu/shoreline/cat_machin.html
Cami Townsend (X)
PRO pts in pair: 227

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
Natalie Grassmann
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19 mins
state-certified mechanical engineering technician


Explanation:
Dear Sonya:

Ich bin eine in Amerika lebende Deutsche. Meine Muttersprache ist Deutsch, aber auch mein Englisch ist so gut als ob es meine Muttersprache wäre.
Wenn Du interesse daran hast, daß ich Dein Zeugnis übersetzte, maile mir doch an stkrg@aol.com

Stefanie

skrug (X)

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
Dan McCrosky (X)

Natalie Grassmann
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17 hrs
state certified machinery design technician


Explanation:
I definitely agree with town313 that one should not use the term "engineer" in any way here, no matter what our dictionaries say, unless the German title Sonja is referring to is "(Diplom)ingenieur so-wie-so" or similar. You can see that immediately in towns313's reference. In Anglo-Saxon countries, an "engineer" has always graduated from a university or college with a BS or MS academic degree. In Germany, the situation is not much different, the "Diplomingenieur" has also studied at a university, "Fachhochschule" or "Technisches Universität" with a period of study of 8 to 12 semesters (as contrasted to a "Fachschule" which is probably meant in Sonja's example).

A further problem here is the "bau" part of the German professional title. This precludes our using any term connected with the operation or maintenance of machinery, such as "machinist". The German professional title refers to the conception, design and construction of an original machine or modifications to existing machines.

The Maschinenbautechniker is also not a draughtsperson (BE) or draftsperson (AE), so where does that leave us?

I think there is no exact, standing Anglo-Saxon term for this profession because we Anglo-Saxons have always thought that the conception and design of machines and other things must be done by an engineer who had been to college, as silly as that is. It may also wrong of the Germans to try to precisely define and train so many thousands of different professions.

My suggestion is an explanatory translation: "state certified machinery design technician".

- HTH - Dan


Dan McCrosky (X)
Local time: 00:43
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 1541
Grading comment
Thanks so much for your detailed answer. It was difficult to choose though because of the other answers. Tom Funke had a very respectable source. towns313 was off about the machinist part because this person already had the machinist training (3 years) before he even started the techniker college--but again good sources. xxxskrug had an answer very close to yours, but your explanation was great!
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