Altertum, Alterthum, Alterthume

German translation: no difference in the meaning

GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
German term or phrase:Altertum, Alterthum, Alterthume
Selected answer:no difference in the meaning
Entered by: espintl

05:24 Nov 7, 2009
German language (monolingual) [Non-PRO]
Art/Literary - Poetry & Literature / Titles
German term or phrase: Altertum, Alterthum, Alterthume
A book under three different titles. what is the difference in meaning, I know the third is the correct one as it apperas ont he book

Traum und Traumdeutung im Altertum
Traum und Traumdeutung im Alterthum
Traum und Traumdeutung im Alterthume

by Büchsenschütz, Bernhard
1868
espintl
Australia
Local time: 20:24
no difference in the meaning
Explanation:
just different old-style ways of spelling the same, the first being the modern spellinh and the third having an extra e added fo style purposes

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 12 mins (2009-11-07 05:37:23 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

sorry, spellin*g*! it is early!
Selected response from:

Stephen Sadie
Germany
Local time: 11:24
Grading comment
Very good. Thanks.
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer



SUMMARY OF ALL EXPLANATIONS PROVIDED
4 +17no difference in the meaning
Stephen Sadie


Discussion entries: 2





  

Answers


12 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +17
no difference in the meaning


Explanation:
just different old-style ways of spelling the same, the first being the modern spellinh and the third having an extra e added fo style purposes

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 12 mins (2009-11-07 05:37:23 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

sorry, spellin*g*! it is early!

Stephen Sadie
Germany
Local time: 11:24
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
Grading comment
Very good. Thanks.

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  British Diana
1 hr
  -> thanks diana

agree  ValtBt
1 hr
  -> thanks valtbt

agree  Rolf Keiser: right you are
3 hrs

agree  Tom Tyson
3 hrs

agree  VictoriaAris (X)
3 hrs

agree  Monika Elisabeth Sieger: Yep!
4 hrs

agree  BirgitBerlin: indeed. It's like "olde" in old English. Even in English they used to like sticking the letter e on the end of everything.
5 hrs

agree  Marianna Tucci
5 hrs

agree  Rebecca Garber: It's a vestigial dative -e, like "im Munde". -e in English is the vestigial germanic adjective ending.
8 hrs

agree  Barbara Wiebking
9 hrs

agree  inkweaver
1 day 3 hrs

agree  Dr. Derk von Moock
1 day 4 hrs

agree  Ingrid Velleine: #1 is the modern spelling, #2 and #3 are the old spelling from the 17th-19th century. There is no difference in meaning.
1 day 4 hrs

agree  Anja C.
1 day 5 hrs

agree  Michaela Müller
1 day 12 hrs

agree  Geneviève von Levetzow
1 day 14 hrs

agree  mjbjosh
4 days
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)



Login or register (free and only takes a few minutes) to participate in this question.

You will also have access to many other tools and opportunities designed for those who have language-related jobs (or are passionate about them). Participation is free and the site has a strict confidentiality policy.

KudoZ™ translation help

The KudoZ network provides a framework for translators and others to assist each other with translations or explanations of terms and short phrases.


See also:

Your current localization setting

English

Select a language

Term search
  • All of ProZ.com
  • Term search
  • Jobs
  • Forums
  • Multiple search