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Blütezeit

English translation: period of prosperity, golden age

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GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
German term or phrase:Blütezeit
English translation:period of prosperity, golden age
Entered by: Nicole Tata
Options:
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09:19 Oct 13, 2004
German to English translations [PRO]
Marketing - Advertising / Public Relations
German term or phrase: Blütezeit
From a ppt chart:

Messestandort Frankfurt: ... so fing alles an

- 794 Gründung der Stadt Ffm
- 1150 erste Erwähnung der Frankfurter Herbstmesse
- 1330 Ludwig der Bayer erlässt Privileg zur Frankfurter Frühjahrsmesse
- 1. Blütezeit zwischen 1330 und 1400
- 2. Blütezeit: 16. Jahrhundert

How do I best render Blütezeit here? I've found Golden Age, Heyday, peak, prime - but don't really like any of them. Does anyone have any good ideas?? Many thanks.
Nicole Tata
Local time: 20:22
period of prosperity
Explanation:
perhaps

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Note added at 11 mins (2004-10-13 09:31:34 GMT)
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I reckon \"golden age\" is going a wee bit too far
Selected response from:

Cilian O'Tuama
Local time: 21:22
Grading comment
Thanks everyone! 'Period of prosperity' will do nicely (although I might use Golden Age as well)
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer



Summary of answers provided
4 +5period of prosperity
Cilian O'Tuama
5golden age
Erik Macki
3 +1Boom period
Roddy Tannahill
4full flowering, full bloom
Constanze Gottwick


Discussion entries: 2





  

Answers


9 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +5
period of prosperity


Explanation:
perhaps

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 11 mins (2004-10-13 09:31:34 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

I reckon \"golden age\" is going a wee bit too far

Cilian O'Tuama
Local time: 21:22
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: English
PRO pts in category: 103
Grading comment
Thanks everyone! 'Period of prosperity' will do nicely (although I might use Golden Age as well)

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Derek Gill Franßen: Yes, probably better than "the good ol' days #1" and "the good ol' days #2"... ;-)
4 mins

agree  Tamara Ferencak
6 mins

agree  Mario Marcolin: yes, since there were more than one
7 mins

agree  TonyTK: Prefer "golden age" myself ...
57 mins

agree  Deborah Shannon: and with TonyTK (as long as it's left inside the quotes!)
6 hrs

neutral  Erik Macki: If you have to avoid golden age, then this is fine...but I must say that Tony is right. I think without a good justification "golden age" is by far a preferable option.
19 hrs
  -> The timers are there to help solve instances like this ;-)
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19 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5 peer agreement (net): +1
Boom period


Explanation:
Just another idea...

Roddy Tannahill
United Kingdom
Local time: 20:22
Works in field
Native speaker of: English

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  TonyTK: ... or this one
46 mins

neutral  Erik Macki: This too might work if there is some legitimate reason to avoid "golden age," except "boom period" really evokes the industrial revolution, and 19th and 20th centuries much more than previous centuries, so it's also a jarring option in this context.
18 hrs
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47 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
full flowering, full bloom


Explanation:
Heyday or prime might be the best option, if you want to preserve the sentence structure. But what about:

(Frankfurt/The city)reached it's first full flowering between 1330 and 1400, .../ (Frankfurt/The city)first flowered between 1330 and 1400, .../(Frankfurt/The city)was in full bloom between 1330 and 1400, and again in the 16th century.


    Reference: http://www.m-w.com/cgi-bin/dictionary?book=Dictionary&va=flo...
    Reference: http://www.m-w.com/cgi-bin/dictionary
Constanze Gottwick
United States
Local time: 15:22
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in GermanGerman

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Frosty
50 mins

disagree  Erik Macki: I think most English speakers would read "full flowering" or "full bloom" and think "huh?"
18 hrs
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19 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5
golden age


Explanation:
Really this is by far the most common English expression for this concept. I'm not sure why it hits you the wrong way--it's much more natural and less jarring than the other suggested options. Certainly in a historical context, as you have here, I can't imagine using another term than "golden age."

Erik Macki
Local time: 12:22
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
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