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Sockel

English translation: podium

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15:24 Nov 18, 2008
German to English translations [PRO]
Tech/Engineering - Architecture
German term or phrase: Sockel
der Sockel eines Gebäudes, hier das Erdgeschoss, das breiter ist als, bzw sich durch anderes Aussehen von den darüberliegenden Stockwerken abhebt - also nicht foundation
m-svenja
Local time: 07:44
English translation:podium
Explanation:
"podium" is defined in the "Penguin Dictionary of Building" as "a wide, low building, above which a tower block rises. It is often one or two storeys high and can cover an entire city site."

Also google for numerous reliable hits, e.g.:

"The 67 storey Elliott Tower consists of a gently curving East façade, forming a shimmering façade and backdrop to the Elliott Street retail podium."
(http://www.worldarchitecturenews.com/index.php?fuseaction=wa...

In other contexts, "Sockel" may of course translate as "skirting"/(US) baseboard (protective strip at junction between interior walls and floors), "plinth" (visible projecting base of an external wall or a projecting construction under the base of a column) or "(machine) base" (e.g. concrete block as foundation for mechanical equipment)
Selected response from:

David Wade
Germany
Local time: 07:44
Grading comment
Selected automatically based on peer agreement.
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
4 +4podium
David Wade
3 +2plinth / ground course / base course
Paul Cohen
4 +1socle course
Helen Shiner
5Base or plinth
Peter Craggs
2 +1base (auch eines Hauses etc.)
Jonathan MacKerron
Summary of reference entries provided
may depend on building
Henry Schroeder

Discussion entries: 2





  

Answers


16 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 2/5Answerer confidence 2/5 peer agreement (net): +1
base (auch eines Hauses etc.)


Explanation:
O-Ton Muret-Sanders

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Note added at 17 mins (2008-11-18 15:41:32 GMT)
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footing / wall base = Langenscheidt Bauwesen

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Note added at 18 mins (2008-11-18 15:42:43 GMT)
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also "plinth / pedastel"

Jonathan MacKerron
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 127

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Henry Schroeder: I always say "base" but I'm not sure.
1 hr

neutral  Helen Shiner: 'base course' is possible, but plinth or pedestal is for sculpture.
1 hr
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21 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +4
podium


Explanation:
"podium" is defined in the "Penguin Dictionary of Building" as "a wide, low building, above which a tower block rises. It is often one or two storeys high and can cover an entire city site."

Also google for numerous reliable hits, e.g.:

"The 67 storey Elliott Tower consists of a gently curving East façade, forming a shimmering façade and backdrop to the Elliott Street retail podium."
(http://www.worldarchitecturenews.com/index.php?fuseaction=wa...

In other contexts, "Sockel" may of course translate as "skirting"/(US) baseboard (protective strip at junction between interior walls and floors), "plinth" (visible projecting base of an external wall or a projecting construction under the base of a column) or "(machine) base" (e.g. concrete block as foundation for mechanical equipment)


David Wade
Germany
Local time: 07:44
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 20
Grading comment
Selected automatically based on peer agreement.

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Paul Skidmore: in this context
13 mins

agree  Raymond Peat: an architect tells me that podium is the correct term here
16 hrs
  -> Thanks for the confirmation, Raymond

agree  Andrew D
1 day19 hrs

agree  Harald Moelzer (medical-translator)
5 days
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1 hr   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5
Base or plinth


Explanation:
Sockelleiste is the word for skirting, the trim at the junction between floor and wall.

Peter Craggs
Germany
Local time: 07:44
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: English
PRO pts in category: 24
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

1 hr   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +1
socle course


Explanation:
The height of the foundation course is 28 cm.; height of moulded socle course, 29 cm.; first masonry course, 60 cm.; second masonry course

http://www.google.co.uk/search?sourceid=navclient&ie=UTF-8&r...

http://books.google.co.uk/books?id=c6Lk3-aPIp4C&pg=RA8-PA230...

The third form of house construction consists of irregular stretches of humbly built walls as seen in the agglomeration of rooms 83 to 86 at the northwest. Sometimes these dwellings borrow earlier walls for re-use as a foundation or socle course.
http://marwp.cla.umn.edu/marwp/PYLOS/aia1992.html

Helen Shiner
United Kingdom
Local time: 06:44
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 246

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  JohnGBell: or simply socle http://www.thefreedictionary.com/socle
15 hrs
  -> Thanks, John
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19 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5 peer agreement (net): +2
plinth / ground course / base course


Explanation:
"A distinct feature forming the lowest part of a masonry column or wall. It usually projects from the surface above and may be of a more durable material. Definition from British Standard 3589"

Bucksch Dictionary of Architecture, Building Construction and Materials






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Note added at 2 hrs (2008-11-18 17:35:12 GMT)
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On the subject of "plinth":

"A recognizable base of an external wall, or the base of courses of a building collectively, if so treated as to give the appearance of a platform."

http://www.buffaloah.com/a/DCTNRY/p/plinth.html



Paul Cohen
Greenland
Local time: 03:44
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 71

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  gangels
15 mins

agree  Helen Shiner: base course or as I suggest, 'socle course'. Do not agree 'plinth' except for sculpture, nor 'ground course'./'Plinth course' possibly, though I have not come across it, but 'plinth', as you suggest, no.
1 hr
  -> Yes, 'plinth' can pertain to sculpture/columns, but a 'plinth course' would be a projecting course of stones at the base of a wall -- or an earth table. / Please see entry no. 3 for plinth: http://www.buffaloah.com/a/DCTNRY/p/plinth.html
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Reference comments


1 hr
Reference: may depend on building

Reference information:
In case you don't know, the German word "Sockel" is very common in the countryside where it is used to describe the walls of the basement. As your sentence says and as is the case for most German houses, the Sockel is slightly different from the walls of the house. In Massivbau this is because the basement walls are concrete and the house walls are brick. I don't know how it is with wood, but imagine something similar. Anyway, the Sockel is essentially a nice word for the "basement walls" in this context. I have tended to use Jonathan's suggestion "base" when I speak about this part of a house in English, but I don't know for sure what word we actually use in America. It may well be that we tend to just call this part the "basement walls" because they are not as prominent in America as in Germany, primarily because Germans tend to have them slightly higher above ground.

If however your question deals with skyscrapers, then I have no idea. It is possible that podium is right, but I can't say.

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Note added at 1 hr (2008-11-18 16:52:58 GMT)
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I just reread your sentence, and yes, because, the Sockel is wider, it suggests something like a podium. The Sockel on normal residential houses does not usually protrude beyond the walls.

Henry Schroeder
United States
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 43
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