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pastöse Malerei

English translation: pasty painting

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09:00 Jan 17, 2003
German to English translations [PRO]
Art/Literary - Art, Arts & Crafts, Painting / Painting
German term or phrase: pastöse Malerei
Pasty painting doesn't sound quite right. Interestingly enough, "pastöse Malerei" only gets 1-2 google hits. I have a sneaking suspicion this might be to do with gouache? Would appreciate a quick answer, as am pressed for time. Thanks in advance.

Pierre Joseph Redouté (1759– 1840) entstammte einer flämischen Malerfamilie. Er war Schüler seines Vaters und durchzog im Jugendalter seine Heimat als wandernder Geselle. 1782 begann er bei seinem älteren Bruder in Paris als Dekorationsmaler zu arbeiten. Ihm missfiel jedoch die im Geschmack der Zeit liegende pastöse Malerei. Redouté begann eine gut durchgezeichnete, naturgetreue und künstlerisch anspruchsvolle Darstellung in der Pflanzenmalerei zu entwickeln.
Sarah Downing
Local time: 11:05
English translation:pasty painting
Explanation:
This is an interim suggestion I am not entirely happy with either. Found one ref for it (see below) but the above term might not be the commonest expression. I'll try to find more...

Steffen :-)

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Note added at 2003-01-17 09:18:23 (GMT)
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Another ref for \"pasty\" (search for the term) but at a German site:

http://www.dust-dbugger.de/interdruck/scripte/vetulani/text/...

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Note added at 2003-01-17 09:21:05 (GMT)
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The following extract/explanation comes from
http://www.fh-potsdam.de/~Kultur/PROJECTS/Farbe/glossar/p5_1...

\"Farbauftrag:

Farbauftrag meint die Art und Weise, wie Künstler die Farbe auf die Leinwand auftragen - ob mit vielen hauchdünnen Farbschichten, den Pinselstrich kaum sichtbar (Lasurmalerei), oder die Farbe, mit grobem Pinsel auf die Leinwand aufgetragen (pastose Malerei) - der Farbauftrag kann sich von Künstler zu Künstler, von Epoche zu Epoche ändern (als Beispiel Klassizistische Malerei versus Impressionismus).\"




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Note added at 2003-01-17 10:47:56 (GMT) Post-grading
--------------------------------------------------

Hi goemia:

For \"wan\" you gave the defs:
>>1. Unnaturally pale, as from physical or emotional stress
2. Suggestive or indicative of weariness, illness, or unhappiness; melancholy<<

As can be seen, these are IMHO rather emotional aspects or impressions whereas \"pastös/pastos\" clearly refers to a technical aspect, as shown in my \"Farbauftrag\" paragraph. The underlying question here is how one would define a painting \"style\", for which I see two levels/possibilities: a) by a certain technique (e.g. \"pastös\") and b) by an intellectual concept/approach or belonging to a certain tradition/school. Both can be interrelated, of course.



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Note added at 2003-01-17 11:36:39 (GMT) Post-grading
--------------------------------------------------

Chris\'s \"pastel style\" may be a valid option here.

He commented: Maybe this is what is meant. It´s odd, though - his style is actually well-defined, although he belongs to a period that was rather fond of the pastel.

>>neutral Steffen Walter: well, that would be \"Pastellmalerei\" then, still at odds (or not?) with what was said in Sarah\'s original. Pastös = Pastell...? Not sure at all...

Chris\'s added comment:
> Now that I have really read the context properly, I am pretty sure that \"pastel\" is a good translation here: the style fashionable at the time is principally described as \"pastel\". Pastös may be a poor attempt to render this. -

My addition: pastel might be 100% alright for the more general painting style while pastös more refers to the technique resp. physical appearance (not necessarily a \"poor attempt\").

Steffen
Selected response from:

Steffen Walter
Germany
Local time: 17:05
Grading comment
Thanks to everyone for your research. I ended up using "pasty" painting, but this one seems to be really tricky ... Have a nice weekend (I know I'm looking forward to mine ...!)
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
5impasto - he painted impastos
Maureen Holm, J.D., LL.M.
3wan painting stylegoemia
3swollen art
Jonathan MacKerron
2pasty painting
Steffen Walter
1pastel styleChris Rowson


Discussion entries: 4





  

Answers


14 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 2/5Answerer confidence 2/5
pasty painting


Explanation:
This is an interim suggestion I am not entirely happy with either. Found one ref for it (see below) but the above term might not be the commonest expression. I'll try to find more...

Steffen :-)

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2003-01-17 09:18:23 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Another ref for \"pasty\" (search for the term) but at a German site:

http://www.dust-dbugger.de/interdruck/scripte/vetulani/text/...

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2003-01-17 09:21:05 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

The following extract/explanation comes from
http://www.fh-potsdam.de/~Kultur/PROJECTS/Farbe/glossar/p5_1...

\"Farbauftrag:

Farbauftrag meint die Art und Weise, wie Künstler die Farbe auf die Leinwand auftragen - ob mit vielen hauchdünnen Farbschichten, den Pinselstrich kaum sichtbar (Lasurmalerei), oder die Farbe, mit grobem Pinsel auf die Leinwand aufgetragen (pastose Malerei) - der Farbauftrag kann sich von Künstler zu Künstler, von Epoche zu Epoche ändern (als Beispiel Klassizistische Malerei versus Impressionismus).\"




--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2003-01-17 10:47:56 (GMT) Post-grading
--------------------------------------------------

Hi goemia:

For \"wan\" you gave the defs:
>>1. Unnaturally pale, as from physical or emotional stress
2. Suggestive or indicative of weariness, illness, or unhappiness; melancholy<<

As can be seen, these are IMHO rather emotional aspects or impressions whereas \"pastös/pastos\" clearly refers to a technical aspect, as shown in my \"Farbauftrag\" paragraph. The underlying question here is how one would define a painting \"style\", for which I see two levels/possibilities: a) by a certain technique (e.g. \"pastös\") and b) by an intellectual concept/approach or belonging to a certain tradition/school. Both can be interrelated, of course.



--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2003-01-17 11:36:39 (GMT) Post-grading
--------------------------------------------------

Chris\'s \"pastel style\" may be a valid option here.

He commented: Maybe this is what is meant. It´s odd, though - his style is actually well-defined, although he belongs to a period that was rather fond of the pastel.

>>neutral Steffen Walter: well, that would be \"Pastellmalerei\" then, still at odds (or not?) with what was said in Sarah\'s original. Pastös = Pastell...? Not sure at all...

Chris\'s added comment:
> Now that I have really read the context properly, I am pretty sure that \"pastel\" is a good translation here: the style fashionable at the time is principally described as \"pastel\". Pastös may be a poor attempt to render this. -

My addition: pastel might be 100% alright for the more general painting style while pastös more refers to the technique resp. physical appearance (not necessarily a \"poor attempt\").

Steffen



    Reference: http://www.jamilehweber.com/conte/exhibition_lichtsteiner.ht...
Steffen Walter
Germany
Local time: 17:05
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in GermanGerman
PRO pts in category: 31
Grading comment
Thanks to everyone for your research. I ended up using "pasty" painting, but this one seems to be really tricky ... Have a nice weekend (I know I'm looking forward to mine ...!)

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
disagree  goemia: See below
1 hr
  -> Too short a throw I'm afraid - see above.

agree  Chris Rowson: I stand by my last "maybe", because pastel painting was so much "im Geschmack der Zeit", but of course it is always risky to suggest that the author didn´t say what he meant, and I accept that your interpretation is at least as likely.
1 day 19 hrs
  -> Thanks for your fair comment :-)
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18 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5
swollen art


Explanation:
gets 8 google hits

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Note added at 2003-01-17 09:20:03 (GMT)
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\"puffy art\" gets 44 hits

Jonathan MacKerron
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 28
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24 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5
wan painting style


Explanation:
Just a feeling here that this would fit in nicely...
"He did not care for the wan painting style in fashion at the time."



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Note added at 2003-01-17 09:28:23 (GMT)
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The American Heritage dictionary defines \"wan\" as:
1. Unnaturally pale, as from physical or emotional stress
2. Suggestive or indicative of weariness, illness, or unhappiness; melancholy

Nice contrast to \"gut durchgezeichnete, naturgetreue und künstlerisch anspruchsvolle\"

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Note added at 2003-01-17 10:38:46 (GMT) Post-grading
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>>>not really if you look at the \"Farbauftrag\" paragraph in my answer
Yes, I considered your \"Farbauftrag\". To me, it is obvious in this case, as your \"Farbauftrag\" suggests, that the author is referring to painting styles and not to technical aspects of what brushes were necessarily used or the consistency of the paint used (which is the first thing \"pasty painting\" calls to my mind).


    my sixth sense
goemia
Local time: 17:05
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
neutral  Steffen Walter: not really if you look at the "Farbauftrag" paragraph in my answer
35 mins
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1 hr   confidence: Answerer confidence 1/5Answerer confidence 1/5
pastel style


Explanation:
Maybe this is what is meant. It´s odd, though - his style is actually well-defined, although he belongs to a period that was rather fond of the pastel.

Chris Rowson
Local time: 17:05
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
neutral  Steffen Walter: well, that would be "Pastellmalerei" then, still at odds (or not?) with what was said in Sarah's original. Pastös = Pastell...? Not sure at all...
16 mins
  -> Now that I have really read the context properly, I ami pretty sure that "pastel" is a good translation here: the style fashionable at the time is principally described as "pastel". Pastös may be a poor attempt to render this.
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1 day 12 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5
impasto - he painted impastos


Explanation:
the standard term - and the era seems right

Maureen Holm, J.D., LL.M.
United States
Local time: 11:05
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
neutral  Chris Rowson: Isn´t impasto more associated with Van Gogh and his (later) period?
6 hrs
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