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Proverb

English translation: Saving for a rainy day

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GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
German term or phrase:Spare in der Zeit, dann hast du in der Not
English translation:Saving for a rainy day
Entered by: Johanna Timm, PhD
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19:30 May 13, 2002
German to English translations [PRO]
Art/Literary - Idioms / Maxims / Sayings
German term or phrase: Proverb
"Spare in der Zeit, so hast du in der Not. > Save for a rainy day."
Is (was) this a popular proverb in English? I found this translation on http://www.serve.com/shea/germusa/prov1.htm
No further context, I just would like to know if it is as popular in English as it is (was) in German. In German it sounds old-fashioned, like a piece of advice from grandmother. Thank you.
Daniel Hartmeier
Argentina
Local time: 18:58
suggestion
Explanation:
Saving for a rainy day is still quite common. Another variation on the theme:
"A penny saved is a penny earned" means that little by little you will save money by not spending your money.
or, less common: "a penny spared is twice got"
Selected response from:

Johanna Timm, PhD
Canada
Local time: 14:58
Grading comment
Before posting the question, I did not think about, how I will select the best answer. I selected the answer of Johanna, because it gave me the idea for an other title, in fact, I will use the proverb for a title of an article, not for a translation. Thanks all.
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
4 +4suggestion
Johanna Timm, PhD
4 +2As immortalised in song lyrics....
jerrie
5Save for a rainy dayKevin Fulton
4 +1sameKlaus Dorn
4Response correction.
R. A. Stegemann
4see explanation ....xxxjerryk


  

Answers


18 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +1
same


Explanation:
I think it is still quite popular in England (note, I didn't say "English"), and yes, it is regarded as old-fashioned and a bit of grandmother's type of advice is attached to it.

However, I don't know a more modern version...

Klaus Dorn
Local time: 00:58
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish, Native in GermanGerman

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Ursula Peter-Czichi: modern version: Spare in der Not, dann hast Du Zeit dazu!
3 hrs
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19 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
see explanation ....


Explanation:
Pretty much the same in English, I'm afraid. Basically a truism, something we know already without having to hear it again.

xxxjerryk
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20 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5
Save for a rainy day


Explanation:
It's been around for a *long* time (probably part of "Poor Richard's Almanac" or even older)

Kevin Fulton
United States
Local time: 17:58
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 4
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24 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +4
suggestion


Explanation:
Saving for a rainy day is still quite common. Another variation on the theme:
"A penny saved is a penny earned" means that little by little you will save money by not spending your money.
or, less common: "a penny spared is twice got"

Johanna Timm, PhD
Canada
Local time: 14:58
Native speaker of: Native in GermanGerman
PRO pts in category: 82
Grading comment
Before posting the question, I did not think about, how I will select the best answer. I selected the answer of Johanna, because it gave me the idea for an other title, in fact, I will use the proverb for a title of an article, not for a translation. Thanks all.

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  xxxbrute
33 mins

agree  gangels
3 hrs

agree  R. A. Stegemann: These expression have little or nothing to do with future emergencies or needs. Rather they are a simpleton's notion of the time value of money and making one's own income available to others for the purpose of investment.
3 hrs

agree  Сергей Лузан
12 hrs
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1 hr   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +2
As immortalised in song lyrics....


Explanation:
Catch a falling star and put it in your pocket, save it for a rainy day.

Although in this context it is more about saving some happiness, something special to bring out on a dark, gloomy day to make you happy again!

jerrie
United Kingdom
Local time: 22:58
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 44

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  R. A. Stegemann: Very nice.
2 hrs
  -> I guess we all need it sometimes!

agree  Joy Christensen: Beautiful - thanks for the reminder of that one!
2 hrs
  -> You're welcome...spread a little happiness!
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4 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
Response correction.


Explanation:
My response to Johanna Timm, Ph.D. should have been DISAGREE.

R. A. Stegemann
Saudi Arabia
Local time: 06:58
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
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Changes made by editors
Jan 12, 2016 - Changes made by Steffen Walter:
Field (specific)(none) » Idioms / Maxims / Sayings


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