Schlepper

English translation: agent (here)

Login or register (free and only takes a few minutes) to participate in this question.

You will also have access to many other tools and opportunities designed for those who have language-related jobs (or are passionate about them). Participation is free and the site has a strict confidentiality policy.

GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
German term or phrase:Schlepper
English translation:agent (here)
Entered by: Chris Rowson
Options:
- Contribute to this entry
- Include in personal glossary

06:58 Jan 17, 2003
German to English translations [PRO]
Art/Literary / Border permeability
German term or phrase: Schlepper
„Wenn Sie fragen, ob ich einen Pass hatte, kann ich sagen, ich hatte nichts dabei. Ich habe auch nicht gesehen, ob der Schlepper für mich einen Pass hatte. Ich habe dem Schlepper 7.000 Dollar gegeben.“

This is from the testimony of an applicant for asylum in Germany. The Schlepper brought him into Germany.
Chris Rowson
Local time: 12:11
agent
Explanation:
This home office document refers to them simply as 'agents'
Selected response from:

jerrie
United Kingdom
Local time: 11:11
Grading comment
Thanks everyone for your contributions. This was not a victim of Menschenhandel, it was a refugee who paid 7,000 dollars for a service (not an unreasonable price, I would think, there must be significant costs, and the man needed the service).

"Agent" is not ideal: I understand the "Schlepper" to have a partly appreciative flavour, in view of German history, but nevertheless to have a slight tone of shadiness. But "tout" and "smuggler" go too far for me. The refugee had a very neutral and practical attitude to the service provided.
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer



Summary of answers provided
4 +4human trafficker
Jonathan MacKerron
4 +4smugglers
Edward L. Crosby III
4 +1guide or courier
Dr. Fred Thomson
4 +1coyote
Dr. Fred Thomson
5From M-S 1901
HansBecker
5conman/ con man
xxxlone
4 +1Sorry Edith, I agree after all!
Deborah Shannon
3 +1smuggler
Mary Worby
4agent
jerrie
3 +1touts
EdithK
4runner
Nicole Tata


  

Answers


5 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5 peer agreement (net): +1
touts


Explanation:
.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2003-01-17 07:06:34 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

also

www.news.bbc.co.uk/hi/english/world/south_asia/newsid_63500...


    Reference: http://www.ipcs.org/archives/06june2001/01apr-june-ref.html
EdithK
Switzerland
Local time: 12:11
Native speaker of: Native in GermanGerman, Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 9198

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Eva Blanar: tout (for smuggling people) - I don't think smuggler fits in this case
7 mins
  -> Thanks, Eva.

neutral  Deborah Shannon: In the UK "touts" are middlemen who resell scarce tickets at rip-off prices. I understand tout as "go-between" in the linked article.
2 hrs
  -> I know what they are on Leicester Square.They are called ticket touts. Still, I've read touts, also in UK papers, and was also surprised.
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

20 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +4
smugglers


Explanation:
works perfectly well (in U.S. English):

"The smugglers that run the rings bringing people across are sent to prison if caught, but the aliens are simply taken back to Mexico."

(http://www.gotessays.com/essays/1427/)

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2003-01-17 07:22:18 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Or:

\"For example, smugglers dropped off Roberto Arturo Olvera Morales, 38, and his wife in the desert west of Agua Prieta last month with instructions to walk north across the desert to a truck awaiting them on the U.S. side.\"

(http://www.freep.com/news/nw/mex29_20000829.htm)


--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2003-01-17 07:24:52 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

I\'ve never seen the term \"touts\" used in the U.S. press; perhaps that\'s British English?

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2003-01-18 01:45:34 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

\"Tout\" is defined in the Merriam Webster Collegiate Dictionary (the only Am. English dictionary I have at my disposal at the moment) as \"one who solicits patronage, spies out racing information for betting purposes, or gives tips or solicits bets on racehorses - chiefly British.\"

Edward L. Crosby III
Local time: 03:11
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 527

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Mary Worby: Beaten to it! I'm British and wouldn't feel comfortable with touts either! ;-)
8 mins
  -> If I win, I'll share the prize :) I've never (yet) seen "touts" in U.S. English. Is it used often in British English?

neutral  EdithK: Found an articles, where it says: Smugglers, couriers and touts - same meaning: www.the-week.com/98july12/events2.htm
15 mins
  -> "Smugglers" is by far the term of choice here in the U.S. "Couriers" are persons hired to bring illicit substances into the country (also called "mules"), and "touts" is essentially unknown in U.S. parlance (in my experience).

agree  Armorel Young: touts isn't right - smuggler seems clear and straightforward
2 hrs
  -> That's what we say. Thanks!

agree  Lucien Marcelet
9 hrs
  -> Merci, lucien!

neutral  Nancy Arrowsmith: I've lived on the border for several years, and have never heard the term used except for drugs
18 hrs
  -> See my references. Those who smuggle drugs are drug smugglers; those who smuggle people are "people smugglers". But since "people" is understood in this context, "smuggler/s" alone works (for me).

agree  Cilian O'Tuama: or 'refugee smuggler'
2 days 8 hrs
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

22 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5 peer agreement (net): +1
smuggler


Explanation:
Is the term I've come across. See references ...

HTH

Mary


    Reference: http://ideas.repec.org/p/fip/feddwp/02-01.html
    Reference: http://www.migrationint.com.au/news/italy/mar_1998-15mn.html
Mary Worby
United Kingdom
Local time: 11:11
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 2770

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Edward L. Crosby III: Yep!
16 hrs
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

1 hr   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +4
human trafficker


Explanation:
see BBC link

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2003-01-17 09:53:57 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

nearly 180 google hits.
Given the serious legal tone of your translation \"human trafficker\" perfectly describes what a \"Schlepper\" is in this specific case, even though it may sound a bit awkward.


    Reference: http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/uk/1456982.stm
Jonathan MacKerron
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 5577

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  farolingo: Totally agree...this is what you usually hear them referred to on the news
4 hrs
  -> much obliged

agree  Sarah Downing
4 hrs
  -> thanks

agree  alszeg: http://www.guardian.co.uk/g2/story/0,3604,493722,00.html
13 hrs

agree  Edward L. Crosby III: OK, but all traffickers are human... "Smugglers" is certainly in common usage here (U.S.).
15 hrs
  -> "traffickers OF humans" is implied
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

1 hr   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
agent


Explanation:
This home office document refers to them simply as 'agents'


    Reference: http://www.homeoffice.gov.uk/rds/pdfs2/r172.pdf
jerrie
United Kingdom
Local time: 11:11
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 1469
Grading comment
Thanks everyone for your contributions. This was not a victim of Menschenhandel, it was a refugee who paid 7,000 dollars for a service (not an unreasonable price, I would think, there must be significant costs, and the man needed the service).

"Agent" is not ideal: I understand the "Schlepper" to have a partly appreciative flavour, in view of German history, but nevertheless to have a slight tone of shadiness. But "tout" and "smuggler" go too far for me. The refugee had a very neutral and practical attitude to the service provided.
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

2 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +1
Sorry Edith, I agree after all!


Explanation:
Lead astray by all the smuggler references ... then I thought I'd open Duden and found that a Schlepper is:

jemand der jemandem einem oft unseriösen, illegalen, betrügerischen o ä Unternehmen auf fragwürdige Weise Kunden o.ä. zuführt.

Tout, go-between, middleman, would all fit the definition, and I'd definitely go for something in a slang register.




Deborah Shannon
Germany
Local time: 12:11
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 707

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  EdithK: No hard feelings. Broad shoulders. Thanks, Deborah.
12 mins

neutral  Edward L. Crosby III: The questioner says "The Schlepper brought him into Germany." That isn't a go-between, in my understanding, that's a smuggler.
14 hrs
  -> Edward, let's agree to ... be neutral! :-)
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

4 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
runner


Explanation:
The Schlepper in your text seems to be the person actually doing the traficking, as well as organising passports and taking payment - wouldn't he simply be called 'the runner'?

Here's a couple of examples:

Cheong, who was later identified as a runner of the passport syndicate, was arrested. ... The passports and Visas, were to be used for illegal human trafficking. ...
www.spinet.gov.sg/cw/archive/pe57a.html

The missing two women and a small boy were among a group of 28 immigrants who were being transported by a Turkish boat-runner to the region of Didimoticho late ...
www.hri.org/news/greek/apeen/ 1998/98-01-02_1.apeen.html

hope it helps

Nicole Tata
Local time: 11:11
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish, Native in GermanGerman
PRO pts in pair: 1326
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

4 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5
conman/ con man


Explanation:
Assuming, of course, that the "Schlepper" is a male.

maybe "trickster"

Interestingly enough, in Yiddish, "Schlepper" means an inept or stupid person", and in Danish it means "kofanger" (a cow catcher)but that's probably besides the point.

Good luck to you !


    x
xxxlone
Canada
Local time: 06:11
Native speaker of: Danish
PRO pts in pair: 330
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

7 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +1
coyote


Explanation:
I know that this will probably not work in your context, but in the US this is precisely the term used for the curs who exploit Mexicans (and others) trying to get over the border from Mexico to the US. They take money to guide them across.

Dr. Fred Thomson
United States
Local time: 04:11
Native speaker of: English
PRO pts in pair: 5861

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Nancy Arrowsmith: yes, I just saw one of them doing their work this morning
21 mins
  -> The coyotes don't usually come up this far. You live too close the the border.

neutral  Edward L. Crosby III: In my two cited articles about illegal Mexican immigrants, they are called "smugglers".
9 hrs
  -> I have no argument with your comment. Nevertheless, along the southern border of the U.S. people who smuggle aliens into the US are called coyotes.
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

7 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +1
guide or courier


Explanation:
Possibilities

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2003-01-18 02:12:11 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Consider using \"alien smugglers.\"

Dr. Fred Thomson
United States
Local time: 04:11
Native speaker of: English
PRO pts in pair: 5861

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Nancy Arrowsmith: sorry for my typo above - it's his work. I've only hear coyotes or guides used here
10 hrs
  -> Me too.
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

2 days 14 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5
From M-S 1901


Explanation:
1. Dragger, hauler, tracker, barrow-man, putter, headsman, hurrier
2. (sl.) bonneter, jackal, runner, tout(er), canvasser, town-traveller

This courtesy of Muret-Sanders 1901.

HansBecker
PRO pts in pair: 13
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)



KudoZ™ translation help

The KudoZ network provides a framework for translators and others to assist each other with translations or explanations of terms and short phrases.


See also:

Your current localization setting

English

Select a language

Term search
  • All of ProZ.com
  • Term search
  • Jobs
  • Forums
  • Multiple search