gletscherhaft

English translation: leviathan

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12:45 Jan 28, 2003
German to English translations [Non-PRO]
Art/Literary
German term or phrase: gletscherhaft
This is about an African language, describing how the name of the local river has also become the word meaning "very big".

Aya ist der Name des großen Flusses; dieser übertrifft infolge seiner gewaltigen Kraft alles andere, daher wendet man seinen Namen im übertragenen Sinne für etwas sehr großes an, wie wir etwa allerdings in ironischem sinne, den Ausdruck "gletscherhaft" anwenden.

Is there a word or metaphor that might convey the same effect in English?
Armorel Young
Local time: 01:38
English translation:leviathan
Explanation:
Would this work?

leviathan:
Etymology: Middle English, from Late Latin, from Hebrew liwyAthAn
1 a often capitalized : a sea monster defeated by Yahweh in various scriptural accounts b : a large sea animal
2 capitalized : the political state; especially : a totalitarian state having a vast bureaucracy
3 : something large or formidable

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Note added at 2003-01-28 13:14:46 (GMT)
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I guess \"behemoth\" would also fall into this category... MJ

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Note added at 2003-01-28 13:15:08 (GMT)
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I guess \"behemoth\" would also fall into this category... MJ
Selected response from:

Michele Johnson
Germany
Local time: 02:38
Grading comment
Thanks. I'm considering going for a comparison with "it's a mammoth task" but everyone's ideas were gratefully received.
3 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer



Summary of answers provided
4 +1like a juggernaut
William Stein
4glacial
Dr. Fred Thomson
2 +2leviathan
Michele Johnson
3glacier-like
Jonathan MacKerron


  

Answers


4 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +1
like a juggernaut


Explanation:
like a Tyrannosaur on steroids

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Note added at 2003-01-28 12:51:33 (GMT)
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Here\'s definition in Merriam Webster\'s Online:
Main Entry: jug·ger·naut
Pronunciation: \'j&-g&r-\"not, -\"nät
Function: noun
Etymology: Hindi JagannAth, literally, lord of the world, title of Vishnu
Date: 1841
1 chiefly British : a large heavy truck
2 : a massive inexorable force, campaign, movement, or object that crushes whatever is in its path <an advertising juggernaut> <a political juggernaut>

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Note added at 2003-01-28 13:11:12 (GMT)
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Here\'s another common possibility:
Like a steamroller.

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Note added at 2003-01-28 14:17:22 (GMT)
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An after-afterthought:
Like a bulldozer. The advantage of \"bulldozer\" is that it is you have the option of using the verb \"to bulldoze\" if that would suit your translation better
Main Entry: bull·doze
Pronunciation: \'bul-\"dOz also \'b&l-
Function: verb
Etymology: perhaps from 1bull + alteration of dose
Date: 1876
transitive senses
1 : to coerce or restrain by threats : BULLY
2 : to move, clear, gouge out, or level off by pushing with or as if with a bulldozer
3 : to force insensitively or ruthlessly <bulldozed the program through the legislature>


William Stein
Costa Rica
Local time: 18:38
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 1734

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Jacqueline van der Spek: I would opt for steamroller
1 hr
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26 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 2/5Answerer confidence 2/5 peer agreement (net): +2
leviathan


Explanation:
Would this work?

leviathan:
Etymology: Middle English, from Late Latin, from Hebrew liwyAthAn
1 a often capitalized : a sea monster defeated by Yahweh in various scriptural accounts b : a large sea animal
2 capitalized : the political state; especially : a totalitarian state having a vast bureaucracy
3 : something large or formidable

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2003-01-28 13:14:46 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

I guess \"behemoth\" would also fall into this category... MJ

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2003-01-28 13:15:08 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

I guess \"behemoth\" would also fall into this category... MJ

Michele Johnson
Germany
Local time: 02:38
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 581
Grading comment
Thanks. I'm considering going for a comparison with "it's a mammoth task" but everyone's ideas were gratefully received.

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Louise Mawbey: great idea
2 mins

agree  Cilian O'Tuama: or 'mammoth', but I'm not sure I understand the question
3 hrs
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1 hr   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
glacial


Explanation:
This terms is used to mean "slow as sin," i.e., it gets done, but it takes forever.
Along with this it also implies inevitableness, i.e., the glazier builds incredibly slowly, but inevitably.


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Note added at 2003-01-28 14:30:16 (GMT)
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Actualy the glacier builds (or moves) slowly.

Dr. Fred Thomson
United States
Local time: 18:38
Native speaker of: English
PRO pts in pair: 5861
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1 hr   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5
glacier-like


Explanation:
so as not to stray from the original

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Note added at 2003-01-28 14:38:00 (GMT)
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\"cascading glacier\"

Jonathan MacKerron
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 5577
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