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Sprechblase

English translation: balloon or word balloon

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GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
German term or phrase:Sprechblase
English translation:balloon or word balloon
Entered by: Dan McCrosky
Options:
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06:51 Jun 1, 2001
German to English translations [PRO]
Art/Literary
German term or phrase: Sprechblase
The context is a comics-style advertisement. Of course, much of the copy is in "Sprechblasen". In its written description and explanation of the advertisement, the advertising agency often mentions these "Sprechblasen". The readership for my translation will be "European" (including all European countries except Germany, Switzerland and Austria) advertising agencies, publishers and printing firms.

So far, my research has turned up the following:

Langenscheidt Muret-Sanders = balloon

Hamblock/Wessels – Großwörterbuch Wirtschaftsenglisch = bubble

Duden/Oxford – Großwörterbuch= balloon

Reinhart von Eichborn – Der kleine Eichborn = bubble or (speech) balloon

NODE – The New Oxford Dictionary of English = balloon

general Google search for "speech bubble": 2460 (many Japanese sites)
general Google search for "speech balloon": 1230
general Google search for "word bubble": 600
general Google search for "word balloon": 1700

specific Google +.uk +English search for "speech bubble": 340
specific Google +.uk +English search for "speech balloon": 40
specific Google +.uk +English search for "word balloon": 20
specific Google +.uk +English search for "word bubble": 20

specific Google +.com +English search for "speech bubble": 1120
specific Google +.com +English search for "speech balloon": 370
specific Google +.com +English search for "word balloon": 1000
specific Google +.com +English search for "word bubble": 300

specific Google +.uk +English search for +bubble +cartoon: 900
specific Google +.uk +English search for +balloon +cartoon: 800

specific Google +.com +English search for +balloon +cartoon: 17,600
specific Google +.com +English search for +bubble +cartoon: 21,800

"speech bubble" seems the easiest to understand and most popular from the hit statistics but this conflicts with NODE, which is always dangerous. Does anybody know for sure? Do I need to write "speech" or "word" or "text", etc. or is "balloon" or "bubble" enough alone?

TIA

Dan
Dan McCrosky
Local time: 01:53
balloon
Explanation:
Balloon is the most frequently used word for this. Bubble is sometimes used, but "balloon" is the clear winner (usage: about 95% of the time).
Selected response from:

profile removed
Grading comment
Later research based on your good answers:

http://www.hughchristie.kent.sch.uk/art3/resources.htm

"Comics: Narratives told by means of a series of drawings arranged in horizontal lines, or strips, or rectangles called panels, and read like text from left to right. The term applies especially to comic strips in newspapers but also to comic books. Comics usually depict the adventures of one or more characters in a limited time sequence. Dialogue is represented by words encircled by a line, called a balloon, which issues from the mouth or head of the character speaking."

http://members.tripod.com/sparehed/wordballoon/links.html

This site "The word balloon" is a good source of info about comics including authors, publishers, terminology including the following site with comics terms in eight languages:

http://www.student.kuleuven.ac.be/~m8107966/terminology.html

English: balloon =

French: ballon, bulle, phylactère =

Flemish/Dutch: ballon, wolkje =

German: Sprechblase =

Danish: (tale)boble =

Spanish: globo, bocadillo =

Italian: fumetto =

Portuguese: balão

Assuming the above is right for the other languages too, it seems to confirm the suggestions from NODE and Longman, and those of you who suggested balloon. It also appears that the German expression dances further out of the queue here in Europe than the English term "balloon". "Balloon" is also better graphically because a balloon always has a string, basket, tail, or just a knot, which looks a bit like the tail in the comics that points to the speaker. A bubble is just round. I believe I will use "word balloon" for added clarity the first time it comes up and "balloon" alone afterwards. The first really definite vote for "balloon" was from CTrans.

Thank you everyone.

Dan

3 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
naballoonKen Cox
nadialog balloonUschi (Ursula) Walke
naspeech bubbleAnita Millar
naballoonprofile removed
naSpeech bubblexxxlone
naballoon/speech bubble
Birgit Wahl


  

Answers


19 mins
balloon/speech bubble


Explanation:
Mein Longman Dictionary hat eine entsprechende Definition bei "balloon" und unter "bubble" mit dem Zusatz "speech bubble" und BrE.
Vielleicht hilft das weiter ...?


    The Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English
Birgit Wahl
Germany
Local time: 01:53
Native speaker of: Native in GermanGerman
PRO pts in pair: 71

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
Vesna Zivcic
18 hrs
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

21 mins
Speech bubble


Explanation:
Google advanced Search has 52,000 hits on "speech bubble". Take a look at:
http://www.sirbernardlovell.s-gloucs.sch.uk/learningcentre/l...

Good luck!


    Google Advanced Search
xxxlone
Canada
Local time: 19:53
Native speaker of: Danish
PRO pts in pair: 330

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
Vesna Zivcic
18 hrs
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

27 mins
balloon


Explanation:
Balloon is the most frequently used word for this. Bubble is sometimes used, but "balloon" is the clear winner (usage: about 95% of the time).


    School of life
profile removed
PRO pts in pair: 98
Grading comment
Later research based on your good answers:

http://www.hughchristie.kent.sch.uk/art3/resources.htm

"Comics: Narratives told by means of a series of drawings arranged in horizontal lines, or strips, or rectangles called panels, and read like text from left to right. The term applies especially to comic strips in newspapers but also to comic books. Comics usually depict the adventures of one or more characters in a limited time sequence. Dialogue is represented by words encircled by a line, called a balloon, which issues from the mouth or head of the character speaking."

http://members.tripod.com/sparehed/wordballoon/links.html

This site "The word balloon" is a good source of info about comics including authors, publishers, terminology including the following site with comics terms in eight languages:

http://www.student.kuleuven.ac.be/~m8107966/terminology.html

English: balloon =

French: ballon, bulle, phylactère =

Flemish/Dutch: ballon, wolkje =

German: Sprechblase =

Danish: (tale)boble =

Spanish: globo, bocadillo =

Italian: fumetto =

Portuguese: balão

Assuming the above is right for the other languages too, it seems to confirm the suggestions from NODE and Longman, and those of you who suggested balloon. It also appears that the German expression dances further out of the queue here in Europe than the English term "balloon". "Balloon" is also better graphically because a balloon always has a string, basket, tail, or just a knot, which looks a bit like the tail in the comics that points to the speaker. A bubble is just round. I believe I will use "word balloon" for added clarity the first time it comes up and "balloon" alone afterwards. The first really definite vote for "balloon" was from CTrans.

Thank you everyone.

Dan
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

50 mins
speech bubble


Explanation:
I teach lots of comics reading children at school and have two kids of my own, but I have never heard it called anything other than speech bubble.
If it is not spoken aloud it's a "think bubble".
Anita

Anita Millar
Local time: 00:53
PRO pts in pair: 68

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
profile removed: typical mistake for non-native
1 hr

Vesna Zivcic: as a non-native I would prefer this expression
18 hrs
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

7 hrs
balloon


Explanation:
for another two cents' worth:

The Chambers Dictionary has under bubble, '...a balloon-shaped outline enclosing the words or thoughts of a strip cartoon character; a balloon-shaped outline enclosing words, etc for insertion into text (proofreading, etc)...'

(and no corresponding entry under 'bubble')

Also, in my (NA) experience, it is always a balloon, never a bubble.

Ken Cox
Local time: 01:53
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 5905
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

9 hrs
dialog balloon


Explanation:
another 2 cents worth and 15000 google hits.

There doesn't seem to be one defenite answer. But, visually I associate the bubble with thought and the balloon with speech.

In German the 'Blasen' could be (air)bubbles or perfectly round blisters like balloons. In my opinion the speech bubble was a mistranslation.

HTH and regards,
Uschi


Uschi (Ursula) Walke
Local time: 10:53
Native speaker of: Native in GermanGerman
PRO pts in pair: 492

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
DPS: wrong opinion,
10 hrs

Gunsou: you're wrong
23 hrs
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)




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