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Ich hab' dich lieb

English translation: You're very dear to me

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GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
German term or phrase:Ich hab' dich lieb
English translation:You're very dear to me
Entered by: jerrie
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07:41 Dec 3, 2003
German to English translations [Non-PRO]
Art/Literary
German term or phrase: Ich hab' dich lieb
It's less than 'I love you', but more than 'I like you', something in between. Does anybody have an idea?

TIA!!!
Fantutti
Local time: 08:11
You're (very) dear to me, you're (really) special
Explanation:
I hold you dear
You're (something) special (to me)
Selected response from:

jerrie
United Kingdom
Local time: 16:11
Grading comment
You're very dear to me. Thank you, Jerrie. I also liked William's answer a lot: I like you a lot. I couldn't ignore the many agrees for berelin. I agree that 'I love you' is overused and misused a lot in North America up to a point where 'I love you' doesn't mean anything, not even 'I like you'. On the other hand, it can mean e v e r y t h i n g , depending on the situation, who says it, and how it is said. Even in the Unites States, people say 'I love you' and really mean it, just as in 'Ich liebe dich'.
Well, thank you so much, everybody!!!
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
4 +12I love youberelin
4 +9I am very fond of you
Anne-Carine Zimmer
4 +7I like you a lot.
William Stein
4 +4You're (very) dear to me, you're (really) special
jerrie
5 -1I embosomed youPedro Afonso
3 +1you mean a lot to me / I care for you a lotAnnikaB
3I have a fancy for you
Yuri Smirnov
4 -1I appreciate youManuel Plaza


  

Answers


5 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +9
I am very fond of you


Explanation:
I think that's it,

Karin

Anne-Carine Zimmer
United States
Local time: 08:11
PRO pts in pair: 276

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Gareth McMillan: Yes indeed. But maybe without the "very"?
21 mins
  -> I wasn't sure about the 'very', but to me "ich hab Dich lieb" is quite stronng and pretty close to "I love you" - this may be subjective, though

agree  Gordon Darroch: with Gareth
42 mins

agree  Mario Marcolin
45 mins

agree  Translations4IT
54 mins

agree  writeaway: Langenscheidt gives 'like' and 'love'-I think being fond is a good solution
1 hr

agree  shabda
1 hr

agree  Edward Guyver: Also with Gareth
2 hrs

agree  Lori Dendy-Molz: I'd go with "very fond", otherwise it's just "gern", isn't it?
3 hrs

agree  izy
8 hrs
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9 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): -1
I appreciate you


Explanation:
Another suggestion

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Note added at 2003-12-03 07:53:26 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

I adore you

Manuel Plaza
Spain
Local time: 17:11
Native speaker of: Native in SpanishSpanish
PRO pts in pair: 16

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
neutral  Gordon Darroch: "adore" is too strong, "appreciate" isn't really used in this sense, it tends to be used to express gratitude for someone's work
41 mins

disagree  Natalie Chandler: Sorry but "lieb haben" never has anything to do with work or gratitude whatsoever!
4 hrs
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10 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5
I have a fancy for you


Explanation:
?

Yuri Smirnov
Local time: 19:11
Native speaker of: Native in BelarusianBelarusian, Native in RussianRussian
PRO pts in pair: 18
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20 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +7
I like you a lot.


Explanation:
I really like you.
All the other verbs have different connotations (too paternal, condescending, etc.)

William Stein
Costa Rica
Local time: 10:11
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 1734

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Gareth McMillan
5 mins

agree  Renate FitzRoy
1 hr

agree  Lori Dendy-Molz: This is good when the relationship is fairly new, I think.
2 hrs
  -> Evolving over time into "I love you", "I hate you", and "Don't I know you from somewhere?"

agree  Dorothee Bardos-Feltoronyi: "I really like you" would be my first choice/see comment on I love you
4 hrs

agree  Jonathan MacKerron: or "I don't barf anymore when I see you"
5 hrs
  -> Always an effective pick-up line.

agree  Caroline McLoughlin
6 hrs

agree  Armorel Young: yes - quite agree that "fond of " is hopeless
8 hrs
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1 hr   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +4
You're (very) dear to me, you're (really) special


Explanation:
I hold you dear
You're (something) special (to me)

jerrie
United Kingdom
Local time: 16:11
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 1469
Grading comment
You're very dear to me. Thank you, Jerrie. I also liked William's answer a lot: I like you a lot. I couldn't ignore the many agrees for berelin. I agree that 'I love you' is overused and misused a lot in North America up to a point where 'I love you' doesn't mean anything, not even 'I like you'. On the other hand, it can mean e v e r y t h i n g , depending on the situation, who says it, and how it is said. Even in the Unites States, people say 'I love you' and really mean it, just as in 'Ich liebe dich'.
Well, thank you so much, everybody!!!

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  writeaway: or as they say in the old films, I think you're swell
2 mins

agree  shabda
12 mins

agree  Kim Metzger
5 hrs

agree  Heidi Stone-Schaller: don't like "i hold you dear" though
5 hrs
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2 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5 peer agreement (net): +1
you mean a lot to me / I care for you a lot


Explanation:
.

AnnikaB
Germany
Local time: 17:11
Native speaker of: Native in GermanGerman
PRO pts in pair: 8

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Heidi Stone-Schaller
4 hrs
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2 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +12
I love you


Explanation:
Unless you actively need to distinguish between "Ich habe Dich lieb" und "ich leibe Dich", I think the most accurate translation is in fact "I love you". "I love you" has nothing like the emotional gravitas of "ich liebe Dich" which is really only used in Germany between romantic partners and in emotionally charged scenes between close relatives. and then not always (I know married couples who have only said "ich liebe Dich" to each other a couple of times in their lives (and yet still appear to have quite good marriages ;-)).
On the other hand, Americans are constantly telling people they love them - even people they don't know (witness any prize winner on a music channel). Parents and their kids say it to each other countless times a day and female friends bandy their love about with wild abandon.
Even us English are much more forthcoming with our "love" than the Germans; my husband is still vaguely uncomfortable when he sees that I sign off emails to close friends (male and female) with "love".
In sum, "I love you" may not be the literal translation, but I think it probably is the functional one (especially if you're translating for the American market).

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2003-12-03 10:12:05 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

oops, should of course read \"ich liebe Dich\"

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2003-12-03 10:15:32 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

oops, should of course read \"ich liebe Dich\"

berelin
Local time: 17:11
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 115

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Roger Matthews: absolutely!
29 mins

agree  Lori Dendy-Molz: Could fit, but I think a little more context is needed to be sure (definitely if addressed to one's child or good friend).
46 mins

agree  Natalie Chandler: In English you say to your children "I love you" (clearly not meant romantically but indicates that you care about them and they are important in your life). More context otherwise needed to know exactly in what relationship this "liebe" is meant.
1 hr

agree  Nicole Tata: nicely argued
2 hrs

neutral  Dorothee Bardos-Feltoronyi: This is the reason why I think that I love you might be too weak for I Hab´Dich lieb. As As a German native speaker my feeling is that Ich liebe Dich is as strong as Ich hab Dich lieb.-Ich hab Dich lieb might be more commonly used in the South/Austria.
2 hrs

agree  Hilary Davies Shelby: i always thought they were the same ... my German friends certainly use it that way when talking to their children
2 hrs

agree  farolingo: agree with idwerk and Natalie...more context needed
2 hrs

agree  Aniello Scognamiglio: good points, nothing to add! Nevertheless, "Ich habe Dich lieb" is not as strong as "I love you".
2 hrs

agree  Heidi Stone-Schaller: agree with italengger, disagree with Dorothee. German make a strong distinction between the two (I have never, ever heard a German mother tell her child "ich liebe dich"), but I agree, Americans definitely don't make that distinction (in choice of words)
4 hrs

agree  TRANSRAPID
4 hrs

agree  ntext: "Ich hab dich lieb" is more common than "ich liebe dich," which tends to sound melodramatic in German. And yes, Americans "love" everything and everybody.
4 hrs

agree  Susan Starling: Good explanation. In my experience "I love you" and "ich habe dich Lieb" are at about the same level. "Ich liebe dich" is much more rare; I don't think you would ever use this as a standard end to a phone call, for example, as lots of couples do in the US
6 hrs

neutral  William Stein: I disagree entirely with Norbert's idea that American's "love" everything. It's used loosely with friends but never with acquaintances. As a general translation, it could get you into all kinds of problems.
7 hrs

agree  Kim Metzger: As an American, I agree with berelin's explanation of the difference and Susan's US perspective.
13 hrs

neutral  AnnikaB: it might work for the american market, but since the question was strictly for something "less than 'I love you', but more than 'I like you'" I think it is inappropriate
13 hrs
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5 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): -1
I embosomed you


Explanation:
Ein Vorschlag von mir!


    Reference: http://pauker.at/deutsch/W%F6rterb%FCcher/Englisch.html?s=I%...
Pedro Afonso
Germany
Local time: 17:11
Native speaker of: Native in PortuguesePortuguese
PRO pts in pair: 12

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
disagree  farolingo: maybe 500 years ago, and even then people might have looked at you funny! ;)
1 hr
  -> Thanks for the joke!

disagree  Caroline McLoughlin: but it certainly made me smile! visions of the recipient being overwhelmed by big busted ladies!! :-)
1 hr
  -> Thanks for the joke!

agree  Gareth McMillan: Nice one. Kind of takes the wind out of their intellectual sails (see above) doesn't it?
20 hrs
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