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in der deutschsprachigen Literatur

English translation: German-language literature

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GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
German term or phrase:deutschsprachige Literatur
English translation:German-language literature
Entered by: Olaf Reibedanz
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02:54 Dec 9, 2003
German to English translations [PRO]
Art/Literary
German term or phrase: in der deutschsprachigen Literatur
Wie erscheint Hitler und dessen Mythos **in der deutschsprachigen Literatur** nach 1945?

If translated literally, this would be "German-speaking literature". But would this not sound a bit odd? (How can literature speak?!) Is there a better wording?
Olaf Reibedanz
Colombia
Local time: 04:53
German-language literature
Explanation:
might give you a way out and yet maintain the distinction that this is not just German literature but German-language literature (after all, Switzerland, Liechtenstein, Austria and some parts of France, Luxemburg etc. also speak German but any literature of theirs would hardly be considered "German literature").
Selected response from:

swisstell
Italy
Local time: 10:53
Grading comment
Thank you all for your suggestions! I prefer "German-language literature" because this term avoids any confusion, while "Germanic" and "German" can give rise to misunderstanding.
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
4 +12German-language literature
swisstell
4 +6German literature
Kim Metzger
5Germanic literature
William Stein


  

Answers


9 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +12
German-language literature


Explanation:
might give you a way out and yet maintain the distinction that this is not just German literature but German-language literature (after all, Switzerland, Liechtenstein, Austria and some parts of France, Luxemburg etc. also speak German but any literature of theirs would hardly be considered "German literature").

swisstell
Italy
Local time: 10:53
Native speaker of: German
PRO pts in pair: 3377
Grading comment
Thank you all for your suggestions! I prefer "German-language literature" because this term avoids any confusion, while "Germanic" and "German" can give rise to misunderstanding.

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Gisela Greenlee
16 mins
  -> thank you, Gisela

agree  Trudy Peters
19 mins
  -> danke, Trudy

agree  Will Matter: better.
21 mins
  -> danke, willmatter

agree  Nancy Arrowsmith: literature of the German-speaking countries
40 mins
  -> thank you, Nancy

agree  Laurel Porter
1 hr
  -> thanks, Laurel

agree  EdithK
2 hrs
  -> thanks, Edith

agree  writeaway
3 hrs
  -> merci, writeaway

agree  xxxCMJ_Trans
4 hrs
  -> thanks, CMJ

agree  Krokodil
4 hrs
  -> thank you, Krokodil

agree  Heidi Stone-Schaller
6 hrs
  -> danke, Heidrun

agree  Maureen Holm, J.D., LL.M.: nice solution
12 hrs
  -> thank you, Maureen

agree  Mario Marcolin
1 day 4 hrs
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1 min   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +6
German literature


Explanation:
That's how I'd do it.
How does Hitler and his mythos appear in German literature after 1945?



--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 5 mins (2003-12-09 02:59:12 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

On second thought, how is Hitler and his mythos portrayed ...

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 27 mins (2003-12-09 03:21:56 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

When I studied German literature, we studied Dürrenmatt, Kafka, Robert Musil, Hesse and Frisch in addition to the writers from Germany.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 42 mins (2003-12-09 03:36:49 GMT)
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And when I studied English literature, we read writers from Ireland, Scotland, Wales, England, Australia and the US.

Kim Metzger
Mexico
Local time: 03:53
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 21840

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Johanna Timm, PhD
1 hr

agree  Cavina: tatally agree
3 hrs

agree  writeaway
4 hrs

agree  xxxIanW: Yes - English literature includes authors from Ireland and other English-speaking countries [ADDED: Sorry, didn't see your last point :->]
4 hrs

agree  Gordon Darroch
4 hrs

agree  OlafK
9 hrs
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3 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5
Germanic literature


Explanation:
That includes Swiss, Austrian and German:

Germanic Languages and Literatures
... the twenty-first century in Germany, Austria, and Switzerland; literary theory ... Two concentrations are available to students: Germanic Literature and German ...
www.yale.edu/bulletin/html2003/grad/gman.html - 21k - Cached - Similar pages

[PDF] IoTr 4-Col SU00
File Format: PDF/Adobe Acrobat - View as HTML
... of the summer, Baumgartner will review all of the encyclopedia’s articles on Germanic literature (from Germany, Austria and Switzerland), make suggestions ...
www.albion.edu/alumni/io/Summer00/aroundcampus13.pdf


William Stein
Costa Rica
Local time: 03:53
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 1734

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Jan Schauseil: spot on
1 hr
  -> Thanks, Jan.

agree  Gareth McMillan: This one because it embraces the idea of all the German speaking countries, and implies the inherent style(s).
1 hr
  -> Thanks, Gareth.

disagree  Robert Schlarb: Do you wish to imply Swedish and Danish as well? "Germanic" includes both German and Scandinavian languages
2 hrs
  -> That's not how it's used in my references, which are quite reputable.

disagree  Cilian O'Tuama: Germanic: a branch of the Indo-European language family containing English, German, Dutch, Afrikaans, Flemish, Frisian, the Scandinavian languages, and Gothic (Merriam-Web., also 'quite reputable') :)
17 hrs
  -> No two-word definition is going to be perfect. What about "German: Pertaining to Germany" Certainly no closer to the mark.
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