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angeschnitten

English translation: see below

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05:39 Jul 5, 2000
German to English translations [PRO]
Art/Literary
German term or phrase: angeschnitten
Talking about a particular Meissen porcelain painter in the 18th century: "Zu Herolds spezifischen Stilmitteln zählen in den Schatten getauchte Vordergrundfiguren, Gerätschaften und Warenballen (he painted harbour scenes), die meist angeschnitten den linken oder rechten Teil des Vordergrundes bestimmen und große räumliche Tiefe dem Mitte- und Hintergrund vermitteln."
Heather Starastin
Canada
Local time: 12:43
English translation:see below
Explanation:
the infinitive of the verb is "anschneiden". It means basically to cut into something. For instance, an "angeschnittenes Brot" is a loaf of bread from which someone has cut slices off. In art it means not having the entire object in the picture, but only part of it. I'm not sure if there's a technical term for this, but you might get around it with something like: "bales of freight, which are only partially in the scene, occupy the left or right foreground and lend great spatial depth to the middle and background..." etc.
Selected response from:

Barbara Schmidt-Runkel
Local time: 18:43
Grading comment
3 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
na? something with "bleed" ?Dan McCrosky
nasee belowBarbara Schmidt-Runkel


  

Answers


51 mins
see below


Explanation:
the infinitive of the verb is "anschneiden". It means basically to cut into something. For instance, an "angeschnittenes Brot" is a loaf of bread from which someone has cut slices off. In art it means not having the entire object in the picture, but only part of it. I'm not sure if there's a technical term for this, but you might get around it with something like: "bales of freight, which are only partially in the scene, occupy the left or right foreground and lend great spatial depth to the middle and background..." etc.

Barbara Schmidt-Runkel
Local time: 18:43
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish, Native in GermanGerman
PRO pts in pair: 22
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55 mins
? something with "bleed" ?


Explanation:
In photography, printing and advertising, one speaks of "bleed" whenever an object runs off the picture at the side or top or when a picture runs off the edge of a page. In advertising photography, the model almost always has a little hair cut off at the top. As Banause, I don't know if you can use "bleed" here. Besides that, I do not think there is an adjective form. NODE shows this use as a verb and noun. These two sites mention this use of "bleed":

http://www.alphalink.com.au/~saulwick/callig8.htm -

http://150.176.251.98/UPM/glossdfs.htm -



Dan McCrosky
Local time: 18:43
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 1541
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