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gliederlösend

English translation: limb-loosening / Eros, the limb-loosener

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GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
German term or phrase:gliederlösend
English translation:limb-loosening / Eros, the limb-loosener
Entered by: Rolf Bueskens
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03:20 Jan 30, 2004
German to English translations [PRO]
Art/Literary / Ancient Greek mythology
German term or phrase: gliederlösend
Topic is ancient Greek history:
„... Eros: ‚gliederlösender’ Bezwinger von Göttern und Menschen...“
Rolf Bueskens
Local time: 22:29
limb-loosening / Eros, the limb-loosener
Explanation:


Reed Magazine: August 1999 > The Words She Commands
... of the world seen by a woman through the poetic lens of eros. ... The Aeolic dactylic
tetrameter acatelectic is as follows: Once again limb-loosening Love makes me ...

Du Bois reading of the infamous "Seizure" poem in "Sappho's Body-In-Pieces," tells of a body rendered inchoate, fragmented, dispersed, though "Eros the limb-loosener," the war monger.(66) After reviewing various translations and interpretations of the poem, du Bois argues that we find neither subjective transcendence nor universal objectivity in Sappho's poems, but the opening of a pre-philosophical subject, "…the beginning of the historical evolution of selfhood, of individuality, the aristocratic origins of what will become the male citizens of the ancient polis, the city-state…"(p.73) As such, Sappho remains an unacknowledged source for the Western literary tradition. In "Asianism and the Theft of Enjoyment," du Bois draws upon Slavoj Zizek theory that traces the roots of xenophobia to resentment over and fear of another's enjoyment. She argues that the neglect and destruction of Sappho's poems is evidence of fear

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Note added at 38 mins (2004-01-30 03:58:47 GMT)
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And a poem:
translated by Peter Saint-Andre

Eros shook my soul like the wind
attacking trees on a mountain.

www.saint-andre.com/poems/fire/sappho_eros.html -

~

Sweet mother, I lack the power
to strike the loom -- I am consumed
with love from slender Aphrodite.

~

Once again limb-loosening Eros shakes me,
a helpless crawling thing, sweet-bitter.
Selected response from:

EdithK
Switzerland
Local time: 12:29
Grading comment
Thank you (to all three) for a great effort.
I was surprised to see my own literal translation confirmed.
In terms of content, I found it virtually impossible to choose between the three answers. So I have chosen the speediest reply.
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer



Summary of answers provided
4 +1limb-loosening / Eros, the limb-loosener
EdithK
4 +1the limb-loosener
Robert Schlarb
4limb-loosening (lethal)
Chris Rowson


  

Answers


35 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +1
gliederl�send
limb-loosening / Eros, the limb-loosener


Explanation:


Reed Magazine: August 1999 > The Words She Commands
... of the world seen by a woman through the poetic lens of eros. ... The Aeolic dactylic
tetrameter acatelectic is as follows: Once again limb-loosening Love makes me ...

Du Bois reading of the infamous "Seizure" poem in "Sappho's Body-In-Pieces," tells of a body rendered inchoate, fragmented, dispersed, though "Eros the limb-loosener," the war monger.(66) After reviewing various translations and interpretations of the poem, du Bois argues that we find neither subjective transcendence nor universal objectivity in Sappho's poems, but the opening of a pre-philosophical subject, "…the beginning of the historical evolution of selfhood, of individuality, the aristocratic origins of what will become the male citizens of the ancient polis, the city-state…"(p.73) As such, Sappho remains an unacknowledged source for the Western literary tradition. In "Asianism and the Theft of Enjoyment," du Bois draws upon Slavoj Zizek theory that traces the roots of xenophobia to resentment over and fear of another's enjoyment. She argues that the neglect and destruction of Sappho's poems is evidence of fear

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 38 mins (2004-01-30 03:58:47 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

And a poem:
translated by Peter Saint-Andre

Eros shook my soul like the wind
attacking trees on a mountain.

www.saint-andre.com/poems/fire/sappho_eros.html -

~

Sweet mother, I lack the power
to strike the loom -- I am consumed
with love from slender Aphrodite.

~

Once again limb-loosening Eros shakes me,
a helpless crawling thing, sweet-bitter.


    web.reed.edu/reed_magazine/aug1999/words/2.html -
EdithK
Switzerland
Local time: 12:29
Native speaker of: Native in GermanGerman, Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 9188
Grading comment
Thank you (to all three) for a great effort.
I was surprised to see my own literal translation confirmed.
In terms of content, I found it virtually impossible to choose between the three answers. So I have chosen the speediest reply.

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
neutral  Lucien Marcelet: limb loosening sounds so awkward
28 mins
  -> Thanks, gliederlösend .... sounds yummi ?

agree  Narasimhan Raghavan: Sacred places, links, fragments ... William Blake, The Marriage of Heaven and Hell. Eros the Limb-loosener shakes ... home.earthlink.net/~folia/sacred.html
32 mins
  -> Thanks, true.
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

3 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
limb-loosening (lethal)


Explanation:
The point being made by those who describe Eros as “limb-loosening” is that although he may seem so sweet and seductive, his effects can be terrible, resembling death, or even leading to actual death (e.g. in the service of the object of desire, or at the ends of a rival). Homer´s usage of “limb-loosening” as an epithet referring to death in battle refers, I think, to the limbs being removed from the body, although in enquiry in Ancient Greek > English/German might yield clarification.

The reference includes the following exposition: “Other Homeric phrases that describe the fallen warrior's experience are similarly applied to sexual passion. In another fragment Archilochus writes, "For such was the passion for lovemaking that twisted itself beneath my heart and poured a thick mist over my eyes, stealing the tender wits from my body." Readers of Homer will recognize the "dark mist" over the eyes as one of his striking images for the dying warrior's experience. Another phrase that describes death, "limb-loosening," is often used to convey the loss of rational control that accompanies desire. Hesiod (late eighth century) calls the god of sexual passion, Eros, the "limb-loosener" who "conquers the mind and shrewd thoughts of all the gods and men." The seventh-century poet Sappho uses the same epithet in a fragment that records for the first time that old standby expression, "bittersweet": "Once again Eros the limb-loosener shakes me, that bittersweet, irresistible creature." The linking of desire to death emphasizes how high the stakes of passion are: one's self-control, mind, humanity itself are all at risk.“

Of course the translation of “gliederlösend” might remain “limb-loosening”, since the German is probably not better-known than the English, or you might do the reader the favour of the elucidation with “lethal”.


    Reference: http://print.google.com/print/doc?isbn=1893554570
Chris Rowson
Local time: 12:29
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 768
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5 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +1
the limb-loosener


Explanation:
At the risk of sounding redundant, I would like to point out that in the Greek text of Hesiod's Theogony (line 119 is obviously being quoted or alliterated to here), due to its position in the sentence the original word, lusimelês, rather has the quality of an epithet or a title. For this reason I would translate it as a noun.
Incidentally, the literal meaning of lusimelês is "limb-relaxing", and thus it does not necessarily carry a violent connotation.
Having stated my preference, in the following I include quotations of the passage from two of the most common English translations.
--
Translation of Hesiod's Theogony by H.G. Eveyln-White (1914):
Eros (Love), fairest among the deathless gods, who unnerves the limbs and overcomes the mind and wise counsels of all gods and all men
within them.
--
Translation by Norman 0. Brown (1953):
Eros [Desire], the most beautiful of the immortal gods, who in every man and every god softens the sinews and overpowers the prudent purpose of the mind.

Eros, the limb-loosener who conquers the hearts of mortals and gods (Th 119-22).
http://www.greekmythology.com/Books/Hesiod-Theogony/Theog__1...
http://www.perseus.tufts.edu/cgi-bin/ptext?doc=Perseus:text:...
http://www.perseus.tufts.edu/cgi-bin/morphindex?lang=greek&l...


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Note added at 2004-01-30 08:58:06 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

The Greek text (for the record):

êd\' Eros, hos kallistos en athanatoisi theoisi,
lusimelês, pantôn de theôn pantôn t\' anthrôpôn
damnatai en stêthessi noon kai epiphrona boulên.


    Reference: http://www.granta.demon.co.uk/arsm/jg/theogony.html
    Reference: http://alexm.here.ru/mirrors/www.enteract.com/jwalz/Eliade/0...
Robert Schlarb
Local time: 12:29
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish, Native in GermanGerman
PRO pts in pair: 1034

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  gangels: good research
7 hrs
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