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Ene, mene, mu, und raus bist du!

English translation: Eeenie, meenie, mineie, mo

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01:36 Jul 14, 2001
German to English translations [PRO]
Art/Literary
German term or phrase: Ene, mene, mu, und raus bist du!
Auszählreim. In diesem Fall eine Überschrift.
heimo
Local time: 09:35
English translation:Eeenie, meenie, mineie, mo
Explanation:
Das ist der ähnlichste Auszählreim, der mir dazu einfällt. Er geht dann weiter:
...catch a tiger by its toe
if it squeals, let it go,
eenie meenie minie mo. Derjenige, bei dem der Finger bei dem letzten "mo" landert, muss suchen oder"ist draußen", je nachdem.
Viel Glück, Anita
Selected response from:

Anita Millar
Local time: 08:35
Grading comment
Once again, I would like to give points to each of you people you sent answers...in this case, I have to choose the fastest one
because each of you supplied useful tips and answers...

Thanks to all of you...
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
na +5Eeenie, meenie, mineie, moAnita Millar
na +1Eenie, meenie, mo, your turn to go.Uschi (Ursula) Walke
naip, dip, do...out goes youambittles
naspelling alternativesDan McCrosky


  

Answers


18 mins peer agreement (net): +5
Eeenie, meenie, mineie, mo


Explanation:
Das ist der ähnlichste Auszählreim, der mir dazu einfällt. Er geht dann weiter:
...catch a tiger by its toe
if it squeals, let it go,
eenie meenie minie mo. Derjenige, bei dem der Finger bei dem letzten "mo" landert, muss suchen oder"ist draußen", je nachdem.
Viel Glück, Anita


    Viele Schulkinder unterrichtet
Anita Millar
Local time: 08:35
PRO pts in pair: 68
Grading comment
Once again, I would like to give points to each of you people you sent answers...in this case, I have to choose the fastest one
because each of you supplied useful tips and answers...

Thanks to all of you...

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  ambittles

agree  Mary Worby: I've never heard the more politically correct version before, though!
4 mins

agree  Davorka Grgic
10 mins

agree  Sonia Rowland
37 mins

agree  Ineke Hardy: The full rhyme goes: "Ene mene Miste, es rappelt in der Kiste, ene mene muh etc.
8 hrs
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1 hr
spelling alternatives


Explanation:
There are several different spelling alternatives for the English version. They all draw about the same number of Google hits:

"eny, meany" : 100

http://www.google.de/search?q=eny meany&btnG=Google-Suche&hl...

"eeenie, meenie" : 143 (including a rock band or singer by that name)

http://www.google.de/search?hl=de&safe=off&q=Eeenie, meenie&...

"eeeny, meeny" : 165

http://www.google.de/search?hl=de&safe=off&q=Eeeny, meeny&bt...

The third spelling comes closest to the NODE – The New Oxford Dictionary of English term "eensy" or "eensy-weensy", which is probably where the words in the rhyme came from if they didn't come from the German rhyme.

The use of the word "tiger" instead of the politically incorrect term that was still in use when I was a child is probably based on the phrase "you've got a tiger by the tail" which has absolutely no logical connection to the rhyme in question. Besides that, tigers don't scream. The old politically incorrect version I learned also used the word "hollers" instead of "screams".

More suitable terms might be "baby", "rabbit", "young 'un", etc, but "tiger" is by far the most widely used today.

By looking at the three URLs above, you might find context examples close to your headline context.

HTH

Dan


Dan McCrosky
Local time: 09:35
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 1541
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1 hr peer agreement (net): +1
Eenie, meenie, mo, your turn to go.


Explanation:
the german nursery rhyme continues:
raus bist du noch lange nicht, sag mir erst wie alt du bist.
(Great for kids to pactise the numbers 3 - 5)

So, the first line means that somebody gets kicked out at random.

The real meaning, however, could refer to age. Too young or too old?

HTH



Uschi (Ursula) Walke
Local time: 18:35
Native speaker of: Native in GermanGerman
PRO pts in pair: 492

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  ambittles
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2 hrs
ip, dip, do...out goes you


Explanation:
I've asked my son (6 years)

ambittles
Local time: 08:35
PRO pts in pair: 26
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