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***Bremsen Sie die Gefahren des Winters aus!***

English translation: Get a grip on the hazards of winter!

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19:43 Nov 13, 2013
German to English translations [PRO]
Marketing - Automotive / Cars & Trucks / Website text
German term or phrase: ***Bremsen Sie die Gefahren des Winters aus!***
Dear Collegues,

This is a headline on a website that offers sports car driving experiences. The particular page is about the winter experience offered.

Here is a bit of the text that follows:
Einfach cool bleiben, wenn es im Winter brenzlig wird: Bei unseren professionellen Trainingseinheiten lernen Sie, potenzielle Gefahren wie überfrierende Nässe oder Schneeverwehungen richtig einzuschätzen u.s.w.

I am looking for a catchy, idiomatic expression in British English.

I came up with: *Put a stop to the hazards of winter!* Not sure I like it.
Do you guys have any suggestions?
Thanks so much!
Sabine Reynaud
United States
Local time: 05:10
English translation:Get a grip on the hazards of winter!
Explanation:
Here's another one you may wish to consider - it embraces the idea of learning to handle icy roads quite well, wtih its 'road grip' inference! And it's snappy too.
Selected response from:

David Moore
Local time: 14:10
Grading comment
I am going with the majority opinion here, though there were a number of good suggestions here. Thanks to everybody!
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
4 +5Get a grip on the hazards of winter!David Moore
3 +4Put the brakes on winter hazards
Michael Martin, MA
3 +2Stop those winter skids and slides
Yorkshireman
4Cool down winter dangers!
fbbest
4get the drop on / outmanoeuvre / outbrake winterLancashireman
3Put a snow job on winter (driving) worries
Ramey Rieger
3Keep winter in your slipstream
suew
Summary of reference entries provided
Was heißt eigentlich "ausbremsen"?
Johanna Timm, PhD

Discussion entries: 11





  

Answers


1 hr   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
Bremsen Sie die Gefahren des Winters aus!
get the drop on / outmanoeuvre / outbrake winter


Explanation:
The verb ‘ausbremsen’ translates into EN as ‘to outbrake’. It means to brake later that an opponent going into a corner and overtake them. A google search will show up countless examples from texts relating to motor racing.
The idea behind this slogan is to beat the dangers posed by winter conditions. Possibilities are:
get the drop on winter
outmanoeuvre winter
or simply
outbrake winter


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Note added at 1 hr (2013-11-13 21:05:51 GMT)
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Es war schon ein geiles Rennen. Den Jakub habe ich die ganze Zeit vor mir gesehen, ich bin ran gekommen und habe ihn ausgebremst.
http://www.motorsport-magazin.com/idm/news-84687-sechster-sa...

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Note added at 1 hr (2013-11-13 21:10:45 GMT)
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The last time this came up, it was me doing the asking:
http://www.proz.com/kudoz/german_to_english/automotive_cars_...

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Note added at 1 hr (2013-11-13 21:16:16 GMT)
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The remarkable rookie was far from disappointed at not completing his hat-trick of wins and being overtaken for the first time in his Grand Prix career as Finn Raikkonen got the drop on him off the line.
http://www.mirror.co.uk/sport/formula-1/ill-beat-you-in-gb-4...

Rosberg did his best to make a race of it at the start as he edged ahead of poleman Vettel and outbraked him into Turn 1.
http://www.autosport.com/news/report.php/id/110063


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Note added at 3 hrs (2013-11-13 23:05:11 GMT)
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According to the reference posted by Dr Timm: “im alltäglichen Sprachgebrauch bedeutet es, jemanden als Vordermann zum langsam Fahren zu zwingen bzw. eben in drastischen Fällen zum Abbremsen."

You might therefore like to consider this alternative:
Stop winter in its tracks

stop something in its tracks
to prevent something from continuing, e.g. Protests have stopped construction in its tracks.
http://www.macmillandictionary.com/dictionary/british/stop

Gefahr = danger/hazard/risk
Since your criterion states “catchy, idiomatic expression in British English”, you may feel that this can be omitted if deemed too obvious to include.

Lancashireman
United Kingdom
Local time: 13:10
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 363
Notes to answerer
Asker: Thanks so much for all the great suggestions and thorough discussion.


Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
neutral  Yorkshireman: As you wrote Andrew, "ausbremsen" is a strategy, not about putting the brakes on - maybe we could elaborate on strategy - strategy always sounds good in marketing copy. At least it shows I'm reading and appreciating what you posted :-)
21 hrs
  -> Get the drop on winter: catchy enough? Thanks for the neutral, anyway; it always looks good on a KudoZ page.

neutral  Cilian O'Tuama: your late addition, "stop winter in its tracks", might work
1 day3 hrs
  -> Thanks, Cilian. With one neutral being equivalent to half an agree, this entry needs six more to draw level with the current front-runners.

neutral  Michael Martin, MA: This may be technically correct but with “catchy slogans” it’s rarely necessary to do full justice to the technicality of the original unless the result makes for a good slogan in the target language as well.
1 day15 hrs
  -> Thank you for sharing your experience. I will bear this advice in mind as I try to develop my career in translating.
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12 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
Bremsen Sie die Gefahren des Winters aus!
Cool down winter dangers!


Explanation:
Keep it simple and use 'cool' that introduces the following section

A longer explanatory alternative may be:

Minimize slip sliding on dangerous winter/icy roads!

fbbest
Italy
Local time: 14:10
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in ItalianItalian
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12 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5
Keep winter in your slipstream


Explanation:
While this doesn't use a word like braking, it does have connotations of motorsport and implies staying in control in winter conditions

Example sentence(s):
  • Sebastian Vettel leaves the chasing pack in his slipstream

    Reference: http://www.theguardian.com/sport/2013/oct/08/guardian-weekly...
suew
United Kingdom
Local time: 13:10
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
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11 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5
Put a snow job on winter (driving) worries


Explanation:
and now for something really different

I think the 'driving' can be left out, as the site make this obvious.

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Note added at 14 hrs (2013-11-14 10:12:03 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Or better,

Give winter (driving) worries a snow job.

Ramey Rieger
Germany
Local time: 14:10
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 77
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16 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +5
Bremsen Sie die Gefahren des Winters aus!
Get a grip on the hazards of winter!


Explanation:
Here's another one you may wish to consider - it embraces the idea of learning to handle icy roads quite well, wtih its 'road grip' inference! And it's snappy too.

David Moore
Local time: 14:10
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 576
Grading comment
I am going with the majority opinion here, though there were a number of good suggestions here. Thanks to everybody!
Notes to answerer
Asker: Thank you David


Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  seehand
40 mins

agree  Melanie Meyer
1 hr

agree  Ramey Rieger: Or even ' firm grip'
9 hrs

agree  Ben Harrison
11 hrs

agree  Cilian O'Tuama: "Get a grip" works in my English; anything with "brakes/slip/snow/slide" doesn't.
12 hrs
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1 hr   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5 peer agreement (net): +2
Stop those winter skids and slides


Explanation:
Could fit the bill.

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Note added at 4 hrs (2013-11-14 00:29:38 GMT)
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I gather that this is all about steering into skids and the right ways of braking when you are already in a skid on icy surfaces and professional handling at speed in winter conditions.

The programme of such training courses for the manufacturer's customers usually takes place first on snowbound roads and then (usually as the climax) at high speed on frozen lakes in Norway or Finland. First as a passenger with a professional driving coach (more like a stunt-driver) and then behind the wheel themselves.

The drivers are shown that you can drive fast on ice, how to handle the car in soft, deep snow - like how to "drift through a drift" - how to handle the transition from a dry road to black ice or patchy ice and how to drive on hard-packed snow without losing grip and how handling changes with snow chains on tyres.

So it's not really about correct braking and steering or defensive winter driving.

What the manufacturers are offering here is the thrill, experience and adventure of high speed driving on snow and ice. All nicely disguised and packaged as a (usually very expensive) training course for safe winter driving and with lots of premium supporting events.

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Note added at 4 hrs (2013-11-14 00:32:15 GMT)
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Alternative: "How to master those winter skids and slides."

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Note added at 15 hrs (2013-11-14 10:46:17 GMT)
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New alternative:
"Slip and slide with safety, speed, and style"

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Note added at 23 hrs (2013-11-14 19:07:03 GMT)
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And another: The ice-driving experience

Yorkshireman
Germany
Local time: 14:10
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 31

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  BrigitteHilgner
19 mins

agree  ElliCom: How about put the brakes on winter skids and slides. This is good imagery.
1 hr
  -> Hi Elli - I thought of something like that, too, but the alliteration attracted me more
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1 hr   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5 peer agreement (net): +4
Put the brakes on winter hazards


Explanation:
Might do the trick..

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Note added at 1 day16 hrs (2013-11-15 12:20:06 GMT)
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I also like:

"steer clear of winter hazards"

.. implying as it does that good driving skills and car handling is involved..

Michael Martin, MA
United States
Local time: 08:10
Native speaker of: Native in GermanGerman, Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 52

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Parrot
1 hr
  -> Thanks, Parrot.

agree  Inge Meinzer
3 hrs
  -> Thank you, Inge.

agree  Pauline Alexiou
11 hrs
  -> Thanks, Pauline.

agree  Vere Barzilai
20 hrs
  -> Thanks, Vere.
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Reference comments


2 hrs peer agreement (net): +2
Reference: Was heißt eigentlich "ausbremsen"?

Reference information:
"an sich kommt das Wort aus dem Rennsport und bedeutet, später zu bremsen als der Gegner und ihn somit vor einer Kurve bzw. am Kurveneingang zu überholen; im alltäglichen Sprachgebrauch bedeutet es, jemanden als Vordermann zum langsam Fahren zu zwingen bzw. eben in drastischen Fällen zum Abbremsen."

http://www.fahrtipps.de/forum/lesen.php?nr=13066&forum=0

Johanna Timm, PhD
Canada
Native speaker of: Native in GermanGerman
PRO pts in category: 82
Note to reference poster
Asker: Hi Johanna, Thanks for the link. The threat on ausbremsen on the forum is hillarious. How do you find these things? I noticed your research is a step up from usual mortals'. Danke


Peer comments on this reference comment (and responses from the reference poster)
agree  Lancashireman: Interesting discussion, e.g. "danke für die bestätigung, daß ich mit meiner rennsport-variante richtig liege." // Indeed! Context here: "sports car driving experiences"
1 hr
  -> yes - context is all!
agree  Cilian O'Tuama: I'd have thought that was already clear
1 day2 hrs
  -> didn’t think so when I posted; there are actually 3 meanings to ‘ausbremsen’, cp. Wiki entry under Ausbremsen „Weitere Bedeutung”) http://de.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ausbremsen
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Changes made by editors
Nov 13, 2013 - Changes made by Gert Sass (M.A.):
Language pairEnglish to German » German to English
Nov 13, 2013 - Changes made by Gert Sass (M.A.):
Language pairGerman to English » English to German
Nov 13, 2013 - Changes made by Klaus Urban:
Language pairEnglish to German » German to English
Nov 13, 2013 - Changes made by Gert Sass (M.A.):
Language pairGerman to English » English to German
Nov 13, 2013 - Changes made by Gert Sass (M.A.):
Language pairEnglish to German » German to English


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